fuelling a 100k audax

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
Hi,

Im after some advice again:blush: this was covered in another post I did which was really helpful and through a really helpful pm, but just have a few queries

firstly about this carbo loading. does it matter what carbs I eat the night before? early morning? or are low gi carbs better like porridge, wholemeal pasta? how many carns is a good guide to go by? also for during the ride, if I knew my bmr and than how many calories I was likely to burn could I just eat that throughout the day. don't want to eat too much but then don't want to eat too little.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
I'd get them in the night before. One never seems to be able to get that much food to be eaten the morning of a big ride. As it's so hot at the moment I'd say it's ever more important getting it eaten the night before.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
Whatever you can to be honest. I did a big ride at the weekend (I've still not done that many) and I had the night before a normal tea and then jimboalee style a pizza and spaghetti on toast. I sometimes do spaghetti on toast, pasta and lentils and things like that in the morning too (I eat porridge anyway) as well as cereal. It's all a bit inexact but I wouldn't say in this heat there's the risk of overeating. When it's so hot you just don't end up eating that much on that day (or maybe that's just me).
 

ASC1951

Guru
Location
Yorkshire
sarahpink said:
firstly about this carbo loading. does it matter what carbs I eat the night before? ..... also for during the ride, if I knew my bmr and than how many calories I was likely to burn could I just eat that throughout the day. don't want to eat too much but then don't want to eat too little.
Don't get too hung up on this, SP - it's a ride, not a scientific experiment.

All this carbo-loading malarkey (as opposed to having enough calories) makes a difference to performance athletes, and a small difference at that. Ditto expensive sports potions. Just make sure you have a substantial meal the night before and a decent breakfast. I can't do with anything fatty before or during exercise, so for me it's cereal with yoghurt and wholemeal toast. Beans on toast is a favourite cyclist cafe food for good reason.

During the ride, slow release carbohydrate rather than just sugars. Again, bananas and fig rolls are deservedly popular. There are so many variables - weather, speed, your fitness - that it's impossible to say how many calories you might use up, so just make sure you have plenty of nibbles (and fluid) with you and keep eating them; you'll have difficulty getting it down if you are seriously over-feeding. Also have some money to buy more if you run out and some people like to take a couple of emergency gels.

The best way to find out what works for you is to do regular long rides. We're all different.
 

lukesdad

Guest
ASC is right forget about carbo-loading. Pasta night before. Slow release energy b/fast at least 2 hrs before you ride.
 

yello

Legendary Member
Location
France
^^ what ASC1951 says. We are all different. I'll ride 100km eating normally the night before, porridge for breakfast and having a banana and flapjack during the ride. No 'carbo load'. But I suspect you'd be a bit quicker than me and are treating this more as a challenge than a pootle. You'll find your own balance in time.

I also agree with Crankarm; hydration is important, especially if it's going to be hot. Take plenty of water. Even if you will be able to refill on route, it can sometimes be a pain to.

Most importantly, don't fret too much. It is only a ride and it's not as if you're venturing out into the Kalahari! Just enjoy it. When you finish, you'll realise it's actually much less daunting than it seems. Even if it doesn't seem daunting, you'll finish thinking it was easier than you thought it'd be!
 
OP
sarahpink

sarahpink

New Member
Location
in devon
Hi thanks for all the responses, has really helped me.
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
marinyork said:
Whatever you can to be honest. I did a big ride at the weekend (I've still not done that many) and I had the night before a normal tea and then jimboalee style a pizza and spaghetti on toast. I sometimes do spaghetti on toast, pasta and lentils and things like that in the morning too (I eat porridge anyway) as well as cereal. It's all a bit inexact but I wouldn't say in this heat there's the risk of overeating. When it's so hot you just don't end up eating that much on that day (or maybe that's just me).
True.

Ambient air temperature needs to be 33 deg C ( same as Neutral skin temp' ) for it to 'feel' hot. There's NO windchill effect.

When the ambient is hotter than 33, your body pumps blood to cool, not heat.
The 'energy to combat Windchill or cooling vs temperature' curve is 'U' shaped.

When the ambient is well below 33, we wear more clothes, but when the ambient is well above 33, there's not a lot we can do except continuously spray with water and let its latent heat of evaporation soak excess heat out of the skin.

At the two extremes, the body's systems are so busy either keeping you warm or cool, your appetite disappears. Too much of this and you eventualy collapse and die.;)

In UK however, there's sod all chance of this happening.:biggrin:
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
ASC1951 said:
The best way to find out what works for you is to do regular long rides. We're all different.
I've done 19x60 mile rides the last year and a half or so. It's still as much of a mystery today as it was when I started but I do think carbon loading works - but then I get told I don't eat enough by plenty of other people. You worry less about the 60 milers and just worry more about the 80, 90 and 100 milers.
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
marinyork said:
I've done 19x60 mile rides the last year and a half or so. It's still as much of a mystery today as it was when I started but I do think carbon loading works - but then I get told I don't eat enough by plenty of other people. You worry less about the 60 milers and just worry more about the 80, 90 and 100 milers.
I'm fast approaching my 120th Audax ride of all time.

What's required is a clever spreadsheet where you enter the distance, weather conditions and AAA points for the ride.

It tells you how much to eat; and the water and salt you'll need to replace en-route.
It also tells you if you should be wearing longs, long sleeved jersey, extra tee shirt, thick socks and wooly gloves...;) and wooly hat.:biggrin:
 
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