General set up on a hybrid.

howard2107

Well-Known Member
Location
Leeds
Hi all,

Just after a bit of advice. Did my longest stint in the saddle yesterday, just over 20 miles, road, tracks, cycle paths, mixed uphill, down hill and flat. After about 17 miles i started to get uncomfortable, not tired or in pain, but i couldn't get comfortable on the bike. I have padded shorts, so no issues with the bum, but i seem to be sat towards the back of the saddle, and too upright it feels as if i am not balanced on the bike.

As a result of this, i have raised the saddle about half an inch (12mm in new money) and rotated the handlebars forward about 20 degrees and readjusted the brake/gear levers to suit. i have yet to try the new set up, but my thinking is if i raise my backside and move the bars forward it will push me more central over the bike.

Are there any rule of thumb measurements for a basic set up that i could look at, or is it just suck it and see?

Cheers...............Howard
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Suck it n see but I think you should move the saddle back and keep the handle bar flat
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
If you've got 'riser' handlebars then I'd swap em over to flat bars, for some reason I can never get on with risers and have fitted flats on all my MTB, Hybrid and Hybridised MTB (the one I stuck 26 inch Schwalbe Marathons and road gearing on for touring that got nicked) bikes. They just feel more comfortable and tend not to be as wide cos they don't have the 2 bends taking up width so you have more room to fit the levers/grips without feeling like a pair of 1970s Cowhorn handlebars. something like these

might be better but you would need to find a set that are the right width for you and with the right sweep angle.
I find that I can tell just by holding them if they will feel 'right' when fitted to the bike then I fit them to the stem on the bike and sort out the height by changing stem (if needed) on an A-head fork or altering it (with a quill type stem)
 

Johnners

Active Member
Location
Bristol
Hi
I've noticed that the longer rides I go on, (20-30 plus miles) my wrists start to ache a bit by the time I get back home. I have a commuter bike with flat bars. It has road tyres (not the slick type) and I stick to cycle tracks and road. I was thinking of trying butterfly or trekking bars. I might try adjusting my saddle but I was wondering if anyone uses butterfly bars?
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
Rotate your brake levers downwards, it raises your forearms, gives you better steering control as more muscles come into play, and spreads the load away from your wrists and up the whole arm.
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
I use butterfly bars, and they work out pretty well. If you ride a lot of narrow paths or timber, they may not be to your liking, but a lot of people who tour , covering a lot of miles per day, use them. My Specialized Sirrus has them, and they give me both a raised and a "drops" position on the bicycle, as well as more hand positions than a flat bar with palm roosts.
 

Johnners

Active Member
Location
Bristol
I use butterfly bars, and they work out pretty well. If you ride a lot of narrow paths or timber, they may not be to your liking, but a lot of people who tour , covering a lot of miles per day, use them. My Specialized Sirrus has them, and they give me both a raised and a "drops" position on the bicycle, as well as more hand positions than a flat bar with palm roosts.
Thanks, I have a Specialised Sirrus as well! I think I will try the butterfly bars as my rides seem to be getting longer.
 
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