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Guardian Interview: MD of Raleigh

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by SamNichols, 23 Nov 2007.

  1. SamNichols

    SamNichols New Member

    Location:
    Colne, Lancs
    Thought that I would draw people's attention to this: Interview with Mark Gouldthorp. Some surprising outbursts within, quite uncharacteristic of business profiles (particularly saying that a lot of your previous employers couldn't organise a piss up in a brewery).
     
  2. SamNichols

    SamNichols New Member

    Location:
    Colne, Lancs
    This is also an interesting:
    "We have a smattering of presence within the national retailers but it is subservient to their own private label. Then independent retailing in the UK is a shambles. It is real Steptoe and Son stuff. Most of them will turn the lights off on a sunny day to save a bit of lecky. If you want to imagine the typical independent bike dealer, he is 50-60, highly cynical, miserable, moaning, scruffy. That's my customer. It is great."
     
  3. LLB

    LLB Guest

    That is my LBS :smile:

    I think he has a point :blush:
     
  4. Mister Paul

    Mister Paul Honky

    Location:
    North Somerset
    Well Raleigh has definitely gone through the mill.

    Thing is though, it hasn't come out the other side yet.

    And if you talk about your customers like that, you'll be in there for quite a while.

    I think he needs to look more closely at the product. Their sales point is flooded by Apollo, Hawk Cycles, and bikes from that car spares chain. If he wants to improve image and sales, he needs to start selling bikes that stand out from the rest. At the moment, given a choice, people will pick the Raleigh because 'they used to be great'. When all the granddads have died there'll be no-one else saying that.

    And it's possible without massively increasing prices. If Halfords can do it with the Subway then anyone can.

    And he's saying that he wouldn't do a 40 minute commute into work on his bike? They need a cyclist in charge with a passion for cycling. Not some bloke who was unhappy working at ICI.
     
  5. Smokin Joe

    Smokin Joe Legendary Member

    I wonder if he has cottoned on to the fact that the "Scruffy Shambles" as he describes the retail outlets are busy helping to make vast profits for the likes of Trek and Giant?

    I doubt if any of them could give a toss if they never saw another Raleigh again. Whinging bastard.
     
  6. dangerousjules

    dangerousjules New Member

    sad state of affairs if their best selling bike is £80 glittering pom pom laden kiddies bike!
     
  7. girofan

    girofan New Member

    I bought a Raleigh 20 years ago. It had rusted around the bottom bracket and chainstays within 2 years!
    Stop whingeing and make a decent frame at a good price or get out of the market! :sad:;)!
     
  8. Chris James

    Chris James Über Member

    Location:
    Huddersfield
    I had a Raleigh Winner bought for me about 25 years ago. It saw very hard use through my school days when I cycled everywhere. Got dug out of the garage when I wanted a commuter in Manchester and then was passed on to my brother in law for his commute to the railway station. It went to the tip last year but the frame was still fine.
     
  9. Lord of the Teapot

    Lord of the Teapot New Member

    I bought a Raleigh Chiltern on 15/11/06. £189.99. Rusting in places already. TUT!
     
  10. Chuffy

    Chuffy Veteran

    Spooky coincidence! My ex-wife and I did a tour of Cornwall back in 1990. Me on a Raleigh Winner, her on a Raleigh Chiltern. It was hard bloody work...

    I seem to recall Raleigh being the default bike manufacturer, in the same way that vacuum cleaners were all Hoovers. Haven't Saracen taken that niche now? I seem to see more of their cheap mtbs around than almost any other manufacturer.
     
  11. Lord of the Teapot

    Lord of the Teapot New Member

    If you go back far enough Raleigh where the worlds largest producer of cycles
     
  12. if you go back far enough a lot of people spoke latin
     
  13. If you go back far enough Bonj was a fish.
     
  14. i remember when the MTB 'boom' came along and Raleigh were caught on the hop, they then recovered and made some very decent bikes that got good reviews, they also had the top racing team at that time. trouble was, they didn't change the range the next year - whereas everyone else was updating theirs. they were left behind after managing to pull it out of the fire. such a shame, but they were too big to adapt to the quick changes of that time.

    The reason Saracen are everywhere could be that they got in at that time, making some very good bikes at great prices... they are the new Raleigh in that fathers now are remembering that they started on a Saracen and so buy one for their kids.

    when i was a kid the Raleigh brand was king, they made solid bikes and every kid aspired to own a Raleigh and every parent bought one. I think part of that remains, hence the kid's bike being the bestseller. they lost their high end though, so the next bike for the kid won't be a Raleigh. They need to have that top end back. they took a chance with their MTB range and it got them that kudos back, for a year. If this guy knew the business he'd be launching a top range of road bikes to get the 'shiny shiny' factor back and get the brand name back into the shops and the minds of cyclists.

    can't see that happening though.
     
  15. I've been to many trade shows where the staff from Raleigh strut around wearing their black uniform shirts like they own the fecking joint. Arrogant twunts. They are a laughing stock throughout the industry. The one and only reason they survive is because so many novices recognise the name because really the bikes are soo shoot. In fact they are the shittest they have ever been now that they have shifted production from Taiwan. We have some in storage, recently retired from the fleet, ordered by a previous employee because he was an idiot. Thirty odd bikes with not a straight drop-out between them.