Haven't got my "Cyclecraft" handy....

Discussion in 'Commuting' started by Stig-OT-Dump, 12 May 2010.

  1. Can someone remind me when hand signals are mandatory and when they are just a courtesy signal and therefore optional.
    Thanks
    Stig
     
  2. Yorkshireman

    Yorkshireman New Member

    I don't think the practice of giving hand signals is mandatory for any road user. It's a good idea if you're cycling and intend to turn right (or overtake parked vehicles etc) :ohmy:
     
  3. summerdays

    summerdays Cycling in the sun Moderator

    Location:
    Bristol
    I do not signal to overtake parked cars ... cars don't why should I ... I instead plan my line carefully and gradually move out same as a car would do. After all what else does a following car think you are going to do when you get to the parked car.
     
  4. gaz

    gaz Cycle Camera TV

    Location:
    South Croydon
    I indicate when moving around parked cars whilst i'm in my car.
    As a cyclist i think you should indicate. Some drivers are dopey, there could be a massive red bus stopped at the bus stop, and they still won't think that you might need to go around it. Indicating with your arm is/should be a big body movement and thus draws attention to you.
     
  5. Alien8

    Alien8 Senior Moment

    The Highway Code states "You should...Give a clear signal to show other road users what you intend to do" so therefore they are not mandatory (but of course failure to signal could have some impact in apportioning blame in an accident).

    The highway code should say:

    Don't use hand signals if they potentially put you in danger (signalling left and getting hooked by the vehicle coming up behind you being a classic example).

    Use hand signals if they enhance your safety.

    Use courtesy hand signals if you're in a good mood
     
  6. ChrisKH

    ChrisKH Veteran

    Location:
    Essex
    Apparently they used to teach you to indicate around parked cars when you learn to drive, now they don't I am told. No doubt someone will step in and refute. :ohmy:
     
  7. GrasB

    GrasB Veteran

    Location:
    Nr Cambridge
    Stop &/or fly over the vehicle, I kid you not!

    In a car I'd never signal round a parked vehicle as it generally causes confusion if there's a side turning near by. However on a bike I would because a lot of motorists don't seem to register you'll actually need to go around the vehicle :ohmy:
     
  8. summerdays

    summerdays Cycling in the sun Moderator

    Location:
    Bristol
    But if you are cycling in the line of traffic then it will naturally take you around the car anyway. Obviously with looking etc.
     
  9. BentMikey

    BentMikey Rider of Seolferwulf

    Location:
    South London
    It's still good to indicate for moving out around parked cars. Both your look back, and your indication, will almost always make the driver behind you hesitate and give you more space.
     
  10. BentMikey

    BentMikey Rider of Seolferwulf

    Location:
    South London
    Back to the OP, you should only indicate when there's a road user that will be helped by that indication. That means looking to be absolutely sure whether anyone needs to know.

    One modifier for cycling is that I'll indicate left, but only very late when turning left and there's other traffic because this helps to prevent left hooks and oncoming right turners going ahead of you.
     
  11. Moodyman

    Moodyman Guru

    what else does a following car think you are going to do when you get to the parked car

    Stop and wait for the road to clear so that you can move out. That's why I hand signal and move out with the moving traffic
     
  12. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    Any process or action that involves a human being is at best 'unreliable' and 'unpredictable'.

    Any process or action that is controlled by a human being is also at best 'unreliable' and 'unpredictable'.


    The only reliable and predictable aspect of cycling is "when you fall off, you will fall to the ground".

    To avoid falling to the ground due to the actions of an unreliable and unpredicable human being, it is best to make all around aware of your intentions. ie. make clear signals.
     
  13. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    I almost got 'left hooked' on the traffic island on A41 / M42. The motorist stopped to apologise and said "I thought you was going down the motorway". "What? On a bicycle", I replied. "That's why I wasn't signalling left!"
     
  14. OP
    OP
    Stig-OT-Dump

    Stig-OT-Dump Veteran

    WHOOPS! It isn't mandatory and courtesy it is safety and courtesy signals that Mr Franklin talks about. And based on his text, it would appear that my behaviour this morning was entirely correct.

    I was approaching a right hand turn with a car quite a way behind me. I had already indicated right - my safety signal that shoudl always be used when crossing the path of traffic. I had moved across the carriageway, was entering a filter lane and starting to brake when a car rolled up to the T-Junction of the side road I was about to turn into. He was also wanting to turn right - a manouvre that would have taken him across my path (there was no other traffic around).

    I didn't indicate again because I thought it would encourage him to pull out in front of me (to "beat" the car that was behind me) and I didn't think he would have sufficient time to clear the junction before I got there.

    Obviously my road position should have allowed him to appreciate my intent, but I think the ambiguity may have encouraged him to err on the side of caution and delay pulling out.

    As I turned past him he shouted something about giving signals and put his hand out of the window to demonstrate what I should have been doing. Having reviewed the Cyclecraft text, I think it was a situation where signalling could have impaired rather than enhanced my safety. That would make it a courtesy signal, and one that I can use at my discretion.
     
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