How to remove a SON hub from a wheel without pringling the rim?

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Dears
Need to send my SON dynohub away for a service which requires removal from the rim. The rim is still in good shape so I'll get it rebuilt when the hub is returned (Harry Rowlands is just up the road).
Any advice before I get the bold cutters out?
 

Salty seadog

Space Cadet...(3rd Class...)
Dears
Need to send my SON dynohub away for a service which requires removal from the rim. The rim is still in good shape so I'll get it rebuilt when the hub is returned (Harry Rowlands is just up the road).
Any advice before I get the bold cutters out?
Send it attached, include a threatening letter. They're good rims
 
Can't imagine why they would need the hub out of the wheel to service it, unless the hub body & flanges seperate in some way? Lunacy to strip an otherwise good wheel just for a service. If I was you I would discuss this with them before actually cutting spokes.

I would also suggest you undo the wheel with a spoke key, just keep going around loosening each spoke a turn at a time.
 
OP
Fab Foodie

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Can't imagine why they would need the hub out of the wheel to service it, unless the hub body & flanges seperate in some way? Lunacy to strip an otherwise good wheel just for a service. If I was you I would discuss this with them before actually cutting spokes.

I would also suggest you undo the wheel with a spoke key, just keep going around loosening each spoke a turn at a time.
There's no other way to have them serviced (the older ones could be done in-situ)....
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
I just undo the wheel, save the spokes/nipples & rim, and rebuild using the same on its return. I've done a couple that way. SON refurbishment is top-quality in my experience.
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
I guess if the OP is set on replacing the spokes as well then bolt cutters are a less tedious option (though I prefer Ian's approach). Assuming an equal number of spokes on each side, cut every third spoke, and keep going round like that.
 
Out of interest how many miles are you guys getting out of a Son28 before it needs a service and how do you know?

My winter bike has one and has done just under 20,000 miles since I built the wheel.

I’m assuming @Fab Foodie ’s had become stiff having read the rollers thread?

As @I like Skol mentioned, loosening eack spoke one turn at a time as you move round the rim will do the trick nice and safely.
 
Out of interest how many miles are you guys getting out of a Son28 before it needs a service and how do you know?

My winter bike has one and has done just under 20,000 miles since I built the wheel.

I’m assuming @Fab Foodie ’s had become stiff having read the rollers thread?

As @I like Skol mentioned, loosening eack spoke one turn at a time as you move round the rim will do the trick nice and safely.
My SON28 has been back once for new bearing after bout 15000 miles. It’s now done about 35000. Was all very efficient via SJS. They rebuilt the wheel afterwards so I can’t help with the original Q.
 
OP
Fab Foodie

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
I guess if the OP is set on replacing the spokes as well then bolt cutters are a less tedious option (though I prefer Ian's approach). Assuming an equal number of spokes on each side, cut every third spoke, and keep going round like that.
Yep, respoking is on the cards.
 
OP
Fab Foodie

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Out of interest how many miles are you guys getting out of a Son28 before it needs a service and how do you know?

My winter bike has one and has done just under 20,000 miles since I built the wheel.

I’m assuming @Fab Foodie ’s had become stiff having read the rollers thread?

As @I like Skol mentioned, loosening eack spoke one turn at a time as you move round the rim will do the trick nice and safely.
Mines about 8 years old, not monster mileage, but definitely not well. I compared it to my Brompton SON and there was a notable difference....
 
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Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
Mine is one of the first generation, with the black barrel. Probably about 16yrs old. It was serviced about 2 yrs ago but I've only just got around to building it up. Its successor, similar size but all silver, has developed play in the bearings. This is the model that can be serviced without dismantling the wheel. It's about 12yrs old. I have another 3, so no shortage of lighting.
 

Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
Just work round the spokes loosening half a turn to start till loose. Then undo the the nipples in fast mode from there. Try to mark which holes had spoke j bend on outside or inside and leading and trailing. When replaced you should do them the same.
 

Brooks

Well-Known Member
Location
S.E. London
If your local bike shop is going to rebuild the wheel once you've had the hub serviced take it to them to remove the hub as well. If not take the spokes out yourself it's a pleasant enough job to do, you'll enjoy it.
 

andrew_s

Guru
Location
Gloucester
Slack off all the spokes, then take them out one by one, and keep them for re-use (unless you've been having problems with them breaking, in which case just cut them out and get new).

It's best to keep the heads in and heads out spokes separate you can put them back the same way when the hub comes back. The spokes should have marked the hub enough that you can tell which holes were heads in and which heads out.

The original black centre and current ball-shaped hubs are made in two halves, and the flanges need to be pulled apart sideways to get at the innards.
The intermediate silver centre cylindrical "Klassik" hubs have a section in one end that unscrews, and can be serviced as a built wheel.
 
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