Hybrid or CC?

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by Paulq, 10 May 2010.

  1. Paulq

    Paulq Bike Rider, Beer Drinker, Biscuit Eater.

    Location:
    Merseyside
    Really need to decide which type of bike to get for when I start commuting to work in a few weeks - about 11 miles each way.

    Am really undecided as to whether to go for a hybrid type bike and if so which one; or whether I should go for the versatility and durability of a CC? Uppermost in my mind is durability of the bike, comfort and something that's low profile enough not to attract any unwanted attention.

    I've looked at the Edinburgh Revolution Cross which looks a nice bike or, in the hybrid cmap a GT Transeo or one of the Giant CRS hybrids or a Marin.

    Not having commuted before I'm just after some guidance from experience from those who have. Only other thing to add is that I have a collapsed disc in my neck so being more upright would be an advantage if possible.

    Cheers. I aim to be 3 stone lighter by September :biggrin:

    Paul.
     
  2. gouldina

    gouldina New Member

    Location:
    London
    I have both types and I like both although they have different characteristics. I'm not sure why you think a CC would be more durable than a hybrid really. I would've thought the reverse was more likely to be the case. Best thing is to try both types out I reckon. You might find you hate the drop bars for example especially as you have a neck problem.
     
  3. Twenty Inch

    Twenty Inch New Member

    Location:
    Behind a desk
    It's really difficult to suggest a bike online. I use a variety - my old roadbike when I want to go fast, the fixie for fun, my commuting hack for robustness. CC bikes are built for cycling over really rugged terrain - it might be overkill. However, I find dropped handlebars on a very high riser are more comfortable in the long run. My only concrete suggestion would be to try them out. Try them in the shop, try them in several shops, borrow one if you can find a mate who'll lend you something for a week....

    About the weight loss - I've just done the maths. Losing 3 stone by Sept would mean eating 1225 calories fewer than you burn DAILY. That's starvation. Perhaps 1 stone would be more realistic?
     
  4. Jezston

    Jezston Über Member

    Location:
    London
    One thing about the hybrid is the flat handlebars mean you are pretty much stuck to riding in one position. Over eleven miles each trip that's going to get uncomfortable fast, especially if the hybrid is a rather rigid aluminium like mine!

    I swapped my handlebars out for a steel bullhorn configuration recently which looks ridiculous but is very comfortable :biggrin:
     
  5. MacB

    MacB Lover of things that come in 3's

    Consider how much you'll be carrying and look at wheelsets carefully. The first bike I bought for commuting was the Giant CRS Alliance, it came with lightish semi-aero wheels and low spoke counts. Laden down it wasn't the comfiest, or best handling and I had running issues with rear wheel spokes(18 stone at start). As I learnt more about bikes I built up a new commuter based around the Surly Xcheck frame with a 9 speed hub gear. If I was doing it again I'd only go with a 3 speed hub. But intended use and terrain will dictate your gear choices. I found the Surly more stable under load and comfier on rougher stuff. Especially on the way home as I got tired and sat heavier in the saddle.

    I'd also avoid plain flat bars - bullhorns, drops or butterfly/trekking would be my choice. Just be aware that some bars are 22.2mm(flat, north road and trekking) and some 23.8mm diameter(drops, bullhorns and moustache), so all controls aren't interchangeable. Messing about with bars and controls can get expensive...I know:biggrin:
     
  6. gouldina

    gouldina New Member

    Location:
    London
    "Really rugged terrain"? Not really. They can handle gravel and grass and stuff but my hybrid with front suspension forks is way better on rough stuff. A CC is virtually a road bike with more clearance, bigger tyres and a more relaxed geometry.
     
  7. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    Are you REALLY going to commute EVERY day?

    Get a bike which will take full mudguards, and load the front with a rubber flap that almost touches the tarmac.

    When it rains, you will thank yourself for fitting the mudguards.

    It might be a good idea to buy a Hybrid/sports tourer with disk brakes. A lot less mess in the wet.
     
  8. Jezston

    Jezston Über Member

    Location:
    London
    Oh, yes indeed. I also know. Or rather the chap at my LBS knows after he had to replace one of my brake/shifters gratis after he snapped it in half trying to fit it to my new, slightly broader handlebars!

    He then had to bore them both out with a drill to get them to fit!
     
  9. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    A CC is a roadbike fitted with canti braze-ons and 'mudguard' clearance to accommodate 'spud' tyres.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Paulq

    Paulq Bike Rider, Beer Drinker, Biscuit Eater.

    Location:
    Merseyside
    That's the plan although I suspect there will be days when I can't due to business reasons.

    My LBS tends to stock Giant/Scott/Dawes/GT brands - I am sure they'll have one of the types that you mention. I have looked at the Giant Seek on their website although (I don't think) it has a suspension fork - not really a problem as I'd lock it out on the road anyway.

    If anyone can recommend such a bike, any brand, I'll take a look.

    Cheers

    Paul
     
  11. cyberknight

    cyberknight As long as I breathe, I attack.

    Location:
    Land of confusion
    N+1 ..

    Some one will say it.

    get a roadie for nice weather and something else for a winter hack.

    I have been commuting for only 2 years and now i have 2 cheap (£300each) bikes , a mtb hybrid with slicks for a hack and a road bike for when it is reasonable.

    I know it is a budget issue and i really understand that as i am skint but i just say to the wife ,even with cost of replaceables i save maybe £700 in petrol and she gets the car so she is not having to lug a 3 year old + pushchair etc on the buses.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Paulq

    Paulq Bike Rider, Beer Drinker, Biscuit Eater.

    Location:
    Merseyside
    Makes sense but I really think I need one bike that will just do what I want to be honest. I think I'll go down the hybrid route rather than cc but I now just have to find the right bike. Have narrowed it down to the Giant Seek 3 and the Edinburgh Revolution Courier Race Disc. Both look really nice bikes; the Giant has better components but is more expensive.

    Decisions decisions....
     
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