IAM advice for drivers regarding cyclists

http://www.iam.org.uk/NR/rdonlyres/1363592A-B145-4AC6-8B73-B2F00EBBF7B2/0/fac17001.pdf

A sheet making some very good points to drivers about cyclists, especially that we may be riding in the middle of the road for a reason, not to delay motorists 'tis just a shame that it is only IAM drivers see this, because they are likely not to need its instruction anyway :smile::blush:!

Still, I've e-mailled it to a few friends of mine. Every little helps.
 
all good stuff, i wish the morons in tin boxes round here would read it and put it into practice.
 
In the past I had this leaflet in my rucksack. Then when someone drives dangerously around me I could just hand them the leaflet and cycle off. I gave it to one driver once, but I didn't hang around to see how they reacted.

I might just print some more out. I have a nice handy waterproof pocket in my new winter jacket.....:smile:
 
OP
Jacomus-rides-Gen

Jacomus-rides-Gen

New Member
Institute of Advanced Motorists
510 Chiswick High Road, London, W4 5RG
Telephone: 020 8996 9600, Fax 020 8996 9601
Fact Sheet 17/001
SHARING THE ROAD WITH CYCLISTS

Cyclists all travel at different speeds and have different levels of road experience. As a driver, you will need to take care to judge their speed as well as the road and weather conditions from the cyclist's point of view. Remember too that some cyclists, particularly younger ones, have never driven a car, and so don’t recognise the problems that they can cause car drivers. In an accident involving a car and a cyclist, whoever is to blame the cyclist will always be the more vulnerable to a serious injury.

The following tips for motorists have been prepared with the National Cycling Strategy Board to avoid adding to the 2,500 cyclists killed or seriously injured each year.
Cyclists don’t have steel armour round them like we do. Passing them at speed within a foot of their elbow may feel perfectly safe from where you are, but it is very disconcerting when you are the cyclist.

Sounding your horn when you are close will startle them, maybe into swerving in front of you. They will usually be aware of you already! Slow down around cyclists and drive smoothly. Keep within the speed limit.

In traffic, make sure that you don’t cut up a cyclist who is about to pass you on the near side.

Don't try to cut across a cyclist when you need to turn left at a junction. Wait behind the cyclist until the cyclist has either turned left or passed the junction.

Park with care and prevent any passengers from opening a door until you are sure that there is no cyclist coming up on either side. Likewise, check over your shoulder to see there’s no cyclist approaching before opening the driver’s door.

Cyclists are advised to take a prominent position in the road well ahead of any manoeuvre to ensure they are in the right place at the right time. If they ride in the middle of the road it is probably not to obstruct your path, but to ensure that they are seen by you and by other motorists.

Cyclists often ride at some distance from the kerb to avoid drains and potholes and to discourage motorists from squeezing them on narrow roads. It is not in their interest to delay motorists deliberately. Remember too that their ability to signal is limited compared to ours, so try to anticipate what they might do from the position they have taken on the road. Please be patient.

Advanced stop lines are for cyclists alone and should be respected, so leave the space between the two sets of stop lines empty, whether or not cyclists are occupying it when you arrive. Be aware of where cycle lanes terminate, because this often means road space is more scarce and that in turn can make a cyclist more vulnerable.

Give young riders even more space than older ones; both old and young riders may swerve suddenly to avoid debris or potholes, but young people are more prone to forget your presence when they do.

Remember to use all your mirrors with extra care before changing direction when there are cyclists about. There might be a cyclist in your blind spot. Pay particular attention on roundabouts, as many accidents to cyclists happen at these junctions. Always signal at roundabouts.

Finally, every motorist has seen some irresponsible cyclists use the pavement, road and zebra crossings, seemingly at random. This is not only dangerous for pedestrians but unlawful, and the police can and do issue penalty notices for such offences. The police take a serious view of such careless or dangerous cycling, particularly when it puts other road users at risk. Responsible motorists give such irresponsible cyclists a wide berth.

For information on any other aspect of driving or riding please contact the IAM on 020 8996 9600 or visit iam.org.uk.
there we go
 

Twenty Inch

New Member
Location
Behind a desk
Good advice, but still the incredible motor-centric arrogance is evident.

"Remember too that some cyclists, particularly younger ones, have never driven a car, and so don’t recognise the problems that they can cause car drivers. "

I would suggest that many drivers have forgotten about riding a bike, and certainly have no idea of the problems they can cause cyclists, including, in my case, three avoidable collisions, one hospitalisation, and a month off work.
 
Twenty Inch said:
Good advice, but still the incredible motor-centric arrogance is evident.

"Remember too that some cyclists, particularly younger ones, have never driven a car, and so don’t recognise the problems that they can cause car drivers. "

I would suggest that many drivers have forgotten about riding a bike, and certainly have no idea of the problems they can cause cyclists, including, in my case, three avoidable collisions, one hospitalisation, and a month off work.
Very true, but it describes the issues in a way that a motorist will relate to and thus might have an impact. If an article puts too much emphisis on what motorist do wrong and suggests that to some extent they may be ignorant of others they would just stop reading. I suppose it is the gently, gently approach.
 
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