Ice...

Tankengine

Active Member
So maybe a stupid question - any tips for riding in minus / 0 temps? Last winter didn't really seem to get that cold and I was mainly commuting (so roads gritted and quite a lot of vehicles meant not really a problem) rather then riding for a ride which I've gotten into since. but I've gone out this morning on the country roads and managed to come off on ice and smacked my head/hip/elbow, ouch. Any tips to avoid? Or worth putting some winter specific tyres on? Took it slow for the rest of the ride and tried not to brake suddenly but that's about the extent of my knowledge :/
 

mrandmrspoves

Middle aged bald git.
Location
Narfuk
Ice is always a hazard best avoided so consider your route carefully. Major roads will have been gritted, so you may need to stick to them. Try going out later in the day if the temperature looks like it will increase. Avoid sheltered areas where the sun cannot get to. Running your tyres a few psi lower may also help with traction.
Then when you have done all of the above, get a recumbent trike.
 

Brandane

Is it because I lied when I was 17?
Location
Costa Clyde.
You need studded tyres like these:
42317-500x500.jpg


They are manufactured by the likes of Schwalbe and cost upwards of £30 each. Obviously only worth investing in if you will need them regularly!

Otherwise, just avoid ice. Having a hip injury which is still causing me problems 2 years after an off on ice, I avoid it. The previous year, cracked ribs from another ice off cost me a weeks wages and a lot of pain. If you don't have to cycle on ice, then don't, IMHO..
 

SpokeyDokey

Into my 64th
Moderator
Every time there are ice warnings someone comes on here saying they've had an off - there's a moral in the story somewhere...

***

More pragmatically - studded tyres or stick to completely dry roads and even if it just looks wet on the occasional spot; get off and walk.
 
OP
Tankengine

Tankengine

Active Member
Haha if I had the space for a recumbent n+1 would of course be a great solution :tongue:

Yeah I guess I should have just avoided the back roads and stuck to B roads. Just tempting when the sun is shinning to head out into the country a bit but lesson learnt.

Are the studded tyres worth it commuting wise? I'm riding every day 22 miles but mostly through central london so plenty of grit and vehicles etc to warm up road temp.....
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
And polish the ice rather nicely at colder temperatures. I think studded tires would be a wise choice.
http://www.instructables.com/id/Pop-Rivet-Ice-Tires-for-Your-Road-Bike/
 

shouldbeinbed

Rollin' along
Location
Manchester way
And polish the ice rather nicely at colder temperatures. I think studded tires would be a wise choice.
http://www.instructables.com/id/Pop-Rivet-Ice-Tires-for-Your-Road-Bike/
Hmmm, not generally on the urban roads, smooth ice is more a walking on the pavement problem and less used back roads.

I have ice spike tyres but do use quieter less gritted back roads, I can choose to use a slightly less direct but more grit/car popular route and I can't think of an example in years when I'd *need* spike tyres on that more urban route. Its only going to be the very occasional surprise early hours or afternoon snowfall that could put you in bother that slush shifting knobblies wouldn't cope with on car busy routes.
 
The trick is listening to the tyres

(perhaps I should patent this as "the Tyre Listener")


Know the sound of your tyres, if it changes to a hiss you are on frost, if it is all white around you then it is snow... however if the tyres go silent then you are on ice and may have problems
 
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