Is this a good price for 6000-2RS sealed bearings?

Jon George

Mamil and couldn't care less
Location
Suffolk an' Good
A few years ago, I refreshed a wheelset by replacing the bearings. I cannot remember exactly how much I paid, but it wasn't much and they lasted ages. I decided to do the same on a Novatec wheelset on my Cyclocross bike and cannot work out what I'm doing wrong. The front set: no problem. The rear? (I partially stripped the thread of a new bearing press because the recess in the freewheel is less than the width of the bearing and I thought it had to go in further.) To assist in the installation I put the bearings in the freezer for about twenty minutes. (A mistake?) I must admit to being heavy-handed with getting the first replacement set in, and within 8 miles of a test ride one of them began making a noise and by the time I got home, it was wreaked. I got another set, put them in far more carefully (and quickly) and the same has happened. I spent £3.62 on the pair. Have I been a twonk expecting something that cheap to work well? If so, any recommendations?
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Yes: peanuts; monkeys.
https://www.hendersonbearings.co.uk...aring-sealed-premium-brand-skf-10x26x8mm.html
"Hambini Q: What is the best bearing brand? A: NTN, NSK, FAG and SKF are all quality bearing suppliers and their products meet ISO/JIS/DIN standards."
 
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I like Skol

A Minging Manc...
Bearings!

For cars I tend towards SKF/Timken/FAG/OEM(in the case of suzuki I have recently learned this means TOYO).

For bikes this can be Enduro or FAG, sometimes SKF. Google is your friend here. If you are unsure of a brand of bearing then do a search and see what comes up. Cheap nameless tat is often just that, cheap worthless tat!!!!
 

gbb

Legendary Member
Location
Peterborough
it is cheap tbf, very cheap. I'd expect to pay maybe £7 each for them at work, SKF or similar brand.
Pressing in bearings, you can damage them very easily, you need to make sure most if not all the pressing force is focused on the outside ring of the bearing. Use the inside ring and you almost certainly will damage it. I use a socket just under the external diameter of the bearing to press them in.
The difference between quality and cheap bearings are endless...
Quality of steel, tolerances , cheap bearings will probably have no cage inside to separate the balls, dearer ones will, cages will prevent the balls contacting each other, seals will be better on better bearings etc etc etc.
Only trouble is, you really don't want to be ham fisted with expensive bearings. You can damage them just as easily.
 
OP
OP
Jon George

Jon George

Mamil and couldn't care less
Location
Suffolk an' Good
Update: I have ordered (from Simply Bearings) the relevant Enduro sizes.
Incidentally, even though I've been a massive twonk regarding this issue, I still calculate that I'm going to be well in pocket - as opposed to getting a new wheelset. :smile:
 
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gbb

Legendary Member
Location
Peterborough
One common fault with cheap bearings is that the balls are not perfectly round.

Ultimately, this is an example that quality inevitably comes at a price. Tolerance, material, construction, design, its not surprising you simply can't manufacture quality bearings (or almost anything) cheaply, something has to give. You (we) could be sure, if anyone cracked that one, they'd smash the competition.
Nothing wrong with cheap bearings per se, rather its using the right quality for the right application.
I always used SKF whenever possibly, I've never had them fail what I'd call prematurely (that's a subjective opinion of course but even so, never felt disappointed)
 
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