Labrador Retrievers?.

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by keithmac, 3 Jun 2018.

  1. keithmac

    keithmac Über Member

    Hello all, we're going to have meet i an hoir with this little pup.

    I know what the outcome will be but just have a couple of reservations.

    Main one is that she'll be on her own from 9 till 4 two days a week which I'm not ovely happy about (they are very sociable apparently). School holidays coming up so not an issue now but will be come September.

    Other issue is pet insurance, what am I likey to pay per month for decent cover?.

    We're well into caravanning now so holidays are no issue as she can come along!.

    When doing the back fence next doors dogs kept popping in and seeing how my wife and children got on with them (they've always wanted a dog) I decided I was being too mean really on the no dog stance.

    We've known the dogs mothers family for 20 years as friends so no chance of puppy farming etc and they're 10 minutes walk up the road.

    Decisions decisions..

    Screenshot_20180603-085955_Samsung Internet.jpg
     
    Kempstonian, Mrs M, matiz and 4 others like this.
  2. vickster

    vickster Legendary Member

    Why not get a quote from Petplan for their lifetime cover. I’d guess at around £40 a month? Don’t forget to factor in annual vaccinations and checks, plus the cost of spaying

    I’d not leave a dog for 7 hours, especially a young one. Look into someone who can come in and take pooch out for a walk. A Labrador is not a cheap dog to have. And she’ll need several hours of exercising a day

    Cute though :okay:
     
    keithmac, theclaud and potsy like this.
  3. OP
    OP
    keithmac

    keithmac Über Member

    The in laws could nip in at dinnertime and let her out for half an hour, reasonably big back garden.

    We have a big field just round the corner as well to let her run off some steam!.

    It is a big decision and I'm trying not to take it lightly!.
     
    raleighnut likes this.
  4. vickster

    vickster Legendary Member

    Yep it’s a 12+ year commitment :smile:
     
    keithmac likes this.
  5. OP
    OP
    keithmac

    keithmac Über Member

    I'll have to have a good read into the insurance, some are shocking bad at paying up apparently..
     
  6. OP
    OP
    keithmac

    keithmac Über Member

    Just like our children then (only maybe 30+ years!).
     
  7. meta lon

    meta lon Guru

    Do you have a Doggy day care near you, can drop the dog off at in the morning?
    My mate uses one 2 days a week, the dog loves it and its perfect for socialising the pup
     
    Kempstonian, raleighnut and Mrs M like this.
  8. Crackle

    Crackle ...

    When mine was young insurance was 20quid a month. At 10 it's now 45 a month.

    You've got the summer to bond and form routines which is good and also make contacts, which you will with a dog, it's impossible not to socialise with others and make those contacts, so you'll probably find people to walk her and look after her when you can't.

    Look into crate training when she's young, very useful. Finally, enjoy, she will end up being a constant and faithful companion.
     
    keithmac and Mrs M like this.
  9. meta lon

    meta lon Guru

    Pet plan or direct line for insurance.
    Dont chop and change, stay put once you decide.
    Insure for at least 3 years until the dog matures.
    Then if its a good healthy animal you can set up a savings plan rather than pay a premium that just goes up every year
     
  10. Crackle

    Crackle ...

    I wouldn't take the savings route but keep the insurance. A cruciate ligament will cost you 4.5k, other ops more, it's unfeasible these days to self-insure unless you're flush.
     
  11. Drago

    Drago Guru

    What a beautiful dog.

    Labs are especially fond of human contact and don't like being left alone. The rough rule of thumb is they shouldn't be regularly left alone for more than 4 hours or it can become distressing for them, or the can get bored and become destructive. You'll have to suck it and see, but you should hopefully get away with it for only two days. Try and associate it with something positive, li,e a long walk the moment you get back. Do bear in mind though that a pup should only have 5 minutes walk for every month of age until they're a year old. More than that can harm their development.

    Petplan is as good as any. Somewhere in the region of 20-25 sheets a month for a youngster?

    Is he a show or field lab? Cant be sure as he's a pup, but he looks like a field lab to me, like my Lemmy. They're bred for hunting and they need a lot of exercise. A lot. Lemmy runs with me most days for 3 miles, and Mrs D then walks him another couple, and he still has enough energy to be like an Emu on acid.

    Weight his food. They can be very prone to pork out. When he gets bigger make sure he can't get his head into the bin and steal food. Adults can stand on their rear legs really well, so don't be surprised to find them in the kitchen stood there scanning the works surfaces for chow.
     
    Last edited: 3 Jun 2018
    raleighnut, Mrs M, gavroche and 2 others like this.
  12. vickster

    vickster Legendary Member

    He’s a she according to the OP ;)

    Maybe get a book. One thing is bitch wee destroys grass, my brother puts some sort of rocks in the water which helps neutralise
     
  13. Drago

    Drago Guru

    Sorry, just woke up! She is beautiful.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    keithmac

    keithmac Über Member

    Off now, wish me luck!
     
    Drago likes this.
  15. Salar

    Salar Über Member

    Location:
    Somewhere
    Lovely dog,

    As others have said, try not to leave her for more than fours and be careful the first year not to walk too far because of soft / developing bones.

    We use Petplan, our dog had an op last year and they paid up in full no problem.
     
    keithmac likes this.
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