Made the switch to carbon

classic33

Legendary Member
It still makes a difference though. My lightest bike is just under 25 lbs, the heaviest one just over 40. All have small diameter steel frame tubes and conventional wheels so the aerodynamics are not greatly different. If I get hit by a gusty cross wind on my 40 lb 3-speed it doesn't have much effect apart from being unpleasant. The same sort of gust is enough to actually blow me noticeably off course on a light bike and make me correct the steering. The overall difference in weight if you include me is small, but when riding a heavy bike the extra weight is added to the extremities not concentrated in the middle as with the rider.
A crosswind can move me on a 40kg Brox. It sits lower, weighs more and has the extra stability of four wheels.

At times, more than I'd be on a bike. The constant in both being the rider. Weight and side cross section. The rider adapts to the conditions, once they get used to the cycle their riding.
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
It still makes a difference though. My lightest bike is just under 25 lbs, the heaviest one just over 40. All have small diameter steel frame tubes and conventional wheels so the aerodynamics are not greatly different. If I get hit by a gusty cross wind on my 40 lb 3-speed it doesn't have much effect apart from being unpleasant. The same sort of gust is enough to actually blow me noticeably off course on a light bike and make me correct the steering. The overall difference in weight if you include me is small, but when riding a heavy bike the extra weight is added to the extremities not concentrated in the middle as with the rider.
That makes sense. Weight at the base of an object has an anchoring effect.

Also, heavy things are harder to blow around. You can put a glass milk bottle on your doorstep and it will still be there in the morning.

You wouldn't be able to say the same for a plastic milk bottle of the same size and shape.
 

Slick

Guru
Yesterday I cycled to work in a 45mph North Westerly and it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.

I nearly opted to drive when I set foot outside the front door and saw the trees bending over but I thought I'd give it a go anyway.

Yep, I got blown around a bit, had to do a fair bit of leaning and correction of steering, but it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be.

For a couple of miles, it was sort of behind me and it was like riding in a vacuum (no resistance).

For a mile or so it was right in my face and it was like riding through treacle.

For a couple of miles it was on my side and I swear I was leaning 30 degrees towards it in order to stay upright.

Glad I did it though. That's another fear put to bed.
Good effort. I deliberately kept the bike in the garage because of the winds last week. 👍
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Wind can help you. Park the car at a station, take the train out into the wind and ride back.

Carnforth to Barrow is one. Settle to Appleby another, direction of wind determines direction of the riding half.
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Wind can help you. Park the car at a station, take the train out into the wind and ride back.

Carnforth to Barrow is one. Settle to Appleby another, direction of wind determines direction of the riding half.
Might as well take the bike lift service up all the hills when out on the MTB! Not for me thanks.
Hills and headwind are all part of the experience and on the whole it generally balances out.
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
Wind can help you. Park the car at a station, take the train out into the wind and ride back.

Carnforth to Barrow is one. Settle to Appleby another, direction of wind determines direction of the riding half.
A few years ago (Its in the Your Ride Today thread) a few of us embarked on our annual Doncaster to London ride. The wind pushed us the whole way, north to south. Fantastic riding.
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
Good effort. I deliberately kept the bike in the garage because of the winds last week. 👍
To be honest, I've avoided windy days for a while now but if I kept that up over the winter, I'd never get out on the bike.

So I took the plunge and it really wasn't that bad (although I might not be too happy cycling in a heavy cross wind on an A road).

The main difference I noticed was that I was more alert than usual, expecting to be blown off my bike any second (which never happened).

In the last few months I have conquered heavy rain and then darkness. Now I am king of the wind as well (that sounds a bit rude when you think about it).

It pays to worry about things beforehand though. Makes you better prepared.
 

Slick

Guru
To be honest, I've avoided windy days for a while now but if I kept that up over the winter, I'd never get out on the bike.

So I took the plunge and it really wasn't that bad (although I might not be too happy cycling in a heavy cross wind on an A road).

The main difference I noticed was that I was more alert than usual, expecting to be blown off my bike any second (which never happened).

In the last few months I have conquered heavy rain and then darkness. Now I am king of the wind as well (that sounds a bit rude when you think about it).

It pays to worry about things beforehand though. Makes you better prepared.
Dark mornings, torrential rain and even sub zero temperatures have never bothered me but I do look at the wind forecast and pick my cycling to work days fro there. Obviously I've been caught out a few times but I normally get away with the 2 or 3 best days of the week. :okay:
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
Dark mornings, torrential rain and even sub zero temperatures have never bothered me but I do look at the wind forecast and pick my cycling to work days fro there. Obviously I've been caught out a few times but I normally get away with the 2 or 3 best days of the week. :okay:
I cycle due east in the morning and due west back home so I avoid days where there is a strong Westerly forecast for the commute home.

The North Westerly on Thursday morning was 45mph gusting to 60mph and to be honest, I was kind of pooping my pants at the thought of going out in it but as the afternoon was forecast to be a slight breeze, I had no real excuse to avoid the commute (other than cowardice).

On the way in, I encountered a large branch across the road (which I moved) and five sheets of box profile sheeting blown off the roof of a milking shed I cycle past (the farmer was surveying the damage as I cycled by).

As I rode under some power lines, I could hear this strange noise like an alien spaceship coming in to land (made me look around a lot until I realised what it was).

I got pushed left and right a bit, struggled a bit where I was going into the wind and got blown along where I was going with it.

I'd envisaged stretches where I would have to get off and walk (especially exposed high ground) but apart from a wobble here and there, I was fine.

As it turns out, I am glad that I did it. It's one for the memory bank.
 

Slick

Guru
I cycle due east in the morning and due west back home so I avoid days where there is a strong Westerly forecast for the commute home.

The North Westerly on Thursday morning was 45mph gusting to 60mph and to be honest, I was kind of pooping my pants at the thought of going out in it but as the afternoon was forecast to be a slight breeze, I had no real excuse to avoid the commute (other than cowardice).

On the way in, I encountered a large branch across the road (which I moved) and five sheets of box profile sheeting blown off the roof of a milking shed I cycle past (the farmer was surveying the damage as I cycled by).

As I rode under some power lines, I could hear this strange noise like an alien spaceship coming in to land (made me look around a lot until I realised what it was).

I got pushed left and right a bit, struggled a bit where I was going into the wind and got blown along where I was going with it.

I'd envisaged stretches where I would have to get off and walk (especially exposed high ground) but apart from a wobble here and there, I was fine.

As it turns out, I am glad that I did it. It's one for the memory bank.
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559267


This was my large branch and it kept me off the bike for some time. :sad:
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
View attachment 559266

View attachment 559267

This was my large branch and it kept me off the bike for some time. :sad:
The branch I came across was nothing as bad as that but it was halfway across the road and about 4 inches in diameter.

I stopped and dragged it onto the verge (5.45am in the morning so I was probably the first person to see it).

We had a whole tree blow over onto the A377 near work a couple of weeks back. Lucky that there was nobody under it at the time.
 
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