Monsoon touring India, and what about the camping!?

Discussion in 'Touring and Adventure Cycling' started by John Peel, 18 Jan 2018.

  1. tyreon

    tyreon Active Member

    In SL

    Just seen troupe of cycle ourists fully loaded coming up to Negombo. Sweating like beasts. Beat. Fazed. Cream crackered. Some wearing lucrative. 30c+. Bedlam. Buses,belching lorries,×50 scooters,cows,dogs,dust,mayhem. U sure Steve? At 24 it' see an experience. Double the age and it could be torture! Could this be called a pleasure...or a look into mayhem.
    Not for me.
    I know u to have a better side than myself so I hope you have fun.
    Rural Europe is no rural Asia. I would only do it for the BBC and a book. £300k
     
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  2. OP
    OP
    John Peel

    John Peel Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Cheshire England
    :smile: I like the term "troupe", it about sums it up. I have been to Sri Lanka and Negombo was pretty busy, but I have also driving around Goa to Karnataka in a clapped out car I borrowed from a hotelier, and Margao city was plain crazy, but I love it, I loved the smiles and the smells (mostly), and the street food. But yes, cycling will be something else, as the roads are mostly loaded with holes and debris, and it will be monsoon season too.

    I was messaged by someone on my Facebook page who has offered to host me for a few days near Mumbai when I arrive, so that will be great to acclimatise. The Atlantic coast of France was a breeze, crossing Spain was much tougher, I'm expecting Italy, Greece and Turkey will be a little lumpy, but there will be campsites, food I'm used to, cleanish water and people I can communicate with, India will be something else. Rain and humidity will be hard going for sure.
     
  3. slowmotion

    slowmotion Quite dreadful

    Location:
    lost somewhere
    @John Peel, you'll be fine if you've had some experience of Indian roads. I was on the roads of Kerala recently (with a local driver) and was surprised by the level of risk at which people drive. There's a distinct pecking order of bus/trucks, mini-buses, cars, motorbikes/tuk-tuks, and right at the bottom, cyclists. I was really surprised by how few cyclists there are now, compared to thirty years ago. Anyway, have a great trip. I'm wildly jealous!
     
    John Peel likes this.
  4. jay clock

    jay clock Massive member

    Location:
    Hampshire UK
    I havent toured there but not read a single blog from anyone who has camped there.
     
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  5. OP
    OP
    John Peel

    John Peel Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Cheshire England
    Oh it’s crazy alright :smile: I love Kerala and especially around Lighthouse Beach. I took a rice boat trip on the back waters too which was great.
     
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  6. slowmotion

    slowmotion Quite dreadful

    Location:
    lost somewhere
    Yes, Kerala's wonderful.:smile:
     
    John Peel likes this.
  7. OP
    OP
    John Peel

    John Peel Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Cheshire England
    No I haven’t either. I got a message on my Facebook page last week from a guy who offered to host me just 60kms down the coast from Mumbai on my vague route. He said he had hosted Leana Niemand and it would be a pleasure, which was really nice of him. Leana Niemand and I have been cyber friends fir a couple of years. An amazing woman who is still cycling the world at 60. Over 150k km’s too.
     
  8. I didn't know elephants could read, let alone drive cars.

    ;)
     
    rualexander likes this.
  9. tyreon

    tyreon Active Member

    U will kno that to camp incognito in GB its best to do so late evening and get up early a.m. Thats a long day...and still u have to find a place to 'hide'. Dunno how u can do this in India when theres always someone around. Contradicting myself, surrounded by jungle I guess u just bash ur way into bush: notsogood me thinks.
    Asking after refuge I wonder whether offered somewhat dowdy lodgings u mite accept to put up the inner of your tent in the room...use your own sleeping gear,sealed off as it were.
    These are only my thoughts and observations: I,m probably odd.Am sure folks are friendly but id want some privacy and not some xxxxx that you can come across. Then ur gonna be hot,tired, gagging for grub,water and a wash...think dust think belching lorries,dirt etc
    Apologies if i sound politcally incorrect...just how i find things thisaway.
     
  10. tyreon

    tyreon Active Member

    FWIW I can no longer go down on my haunches these days: buggered knees. So to do 'my business' would be impossible...so would have to lay down to toilet! Impossible!
    Dread getting any stomach difficulties.

    You read that instead of moon missions India would best invest in a 2 million toilet system. Locals often defecate in the fields
     
  11. OP
    OP
    John Peel

    John Peel Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Cheshire England
    Yes, I was hoping to not have to take my camping gear and just stay in digs, but like you say, if the digs are crawling then I might need more protection than a Mozzie net and setting up the mesh tent would be the way to go for sure.

    I wonder how easy it would be to find a different hotel each night. I wouldn’t want to find I can’t get one.
     
  12. Adam4868

    Adam4868 Veteran

    You'll very rarely be unable to find accomodation in India,I used to have a sort of sleepsheet/ sleeping bag(had made for a couple of quid there).
     
    John Peel likes this.
  13. tyreon

    tyreon Active Member

    John Peel likes this.
  14. Ticktockmy

    Ticktockmy Veteran

    I smile, when the age of mature cyclist's comes up in the media, for cyclist being 62 is nothing, but to the non cyclists being age 62 seem to mean that shortly you will be leaving this mortal world. World touring is only after all a series of day rides with rest day thrown in for good measure. But for the non cyclist starting out on his first ride can become quite a challange as Steve found out. and no doubt Robert will find out, if you check on the internet you will find so many old wrinklies some in there late 70;s still pounding the pedals heading into the great unknown. Anne Mustoe for an example who was 76 when she passed away unexpectly in aleppo, syria during one of her tours.
     
    John Peel likes this.
  15. tyreon

    tyreon Active Member

    Good job theres no drug testing hereabouts. Most of us oldies are on 'em...when we wish we weren't. Now in our younger days....continues
     
    John Peel likes this.
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