My exceptionally slow heart rate ...........

I am now 71 and up until Dec. 2017 I was almost exceptionally fit with a resting heart rate of the high 40's to mid 50's and a full on rate of 180/190.

Unfortunately I have experienced some distinct heart and lung problems since then and it is only recently that I have actually been able to get my leg up and over the cross bar on one of my turbo mounted bikes where I have been carrying out some very carefully monitored and brief training sessions.

I have now been able to get up to 25 mins. duration, but only on a very low torque settings as I gradually build up the wasted muscle mass in my legs whilst at the same time keeping a very close watch on my heart rate, blood pressure and blood oxygen levels.

The thing that is causing me more than a little concern (which is a factor I have taken up with my cardiology and respiratory consultants) is the speed of my load heart rate, or rather the distinct lack of heart rate even when I am working as hard as I dare.................. So far the highest speed my dear old ticker has got to is an utterly pathetic 82 bpm!

I was wondering if anyone one else on cyclechat had experienced similar problems?
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
Are you on any kind of medication that might be restricting it (e.g. beta blockers)?
 

YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
Had to say without knowing what the actual load is. Perhaps see if you can do a supervised stress test via your cardiologist. What are the other heart and lung problems you are having?
 

Bill Gates

Guest
Location
West Sussex
Does it matter what your heart rate is for your level of training, which after all is a reflection of the effort and if the effort is not intense then you wouldn't expect the heart rate to be high. I never bother with heart rates anymore, unless it's my resting heart rate that is elevated. It's how you feel that is more important. A complete loss of fitness needs time to get over. Take it steady and progress will come. Medications can affect your fitness and sense of well being so research side effects if you're on anything.
 

Colin_P

Veteran
Are you on any kind of medication that might be restricting it (e.g. beta blockers)?
Good point.

I'm on a very high dose of beta blockers and my heart maxes out at about 110bpm as a result. The other thing is that it takes a good half an hour to be able to achieve that. The heart takes some waking up from its chemically induced slumber.
 
OP
buzzy-beans

buzzy-beans

Senior Member
Had to say without knowing what the actual load is. Perhaps see if you can do a supervised stress test via your cardiologist. What are the other heart and lung problems you are having?
My lungs had been causing some concerns, but now the consultant believes I simply have a type of asthma, however I never exhibit any kind of normally accepted asthmatic signs!
The cardiologist did send me for a tread mill test which they stopped after only 2 mins. as they thought it was too dangerous for me to continue, but they have never given me any reasons why!
A very large stent (38mm) was fitted in April 2019 since when I have had 3 x cat. '1' trips by ambulance to A&E but in each case after I hadn't shown any heart attack symptoms I was discharged.
I recently had a further angiogram examination, this time at Papworth, because the specialist at P.boro thought the stent might have collapsed.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Valhalla
A friend of mine is 82, still runs marathons and has (now had) done so for 60 odd years. As a result his heart rate was astonishingly low, well in the 30's at rest.

His GP noted this during a medical and referred him to a cardiologist, despite my chums protestations that he felt tip-top. Next thing he knows they've fitted a pacemaker type thing that keeps his resting rate in the mid 50's, and he says that since that day hes "never felt so s**t" and has had to quit running because he feels so strange all the time.

Mine is down in the 40's at complete rest, and can occasionally dip into the 30's in my sleep, and no matter how nuts I go with exercise it peaks at 150. Some of it is hereditary from my Dad's side, and some of it due to a life of cycling - either way, I fear the day some smart arriss GP decides that I too need a defib thing. I'll tell them to sod off if they do, at least while i'm still active and feel ok.

You don't state specifically what your heart and lung problems are, but good luck. The weakness sounds alarming.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
A friend of mine is 82, still runs marathons and has (now had) done so for 60 odd years. As a result his heart rate was astonishingly low, well in the 30's at rest.

His GP noted this during a medical and referred him to a cardiologist, despite my chums protestations that he felt tip-top. Next thing he knows they've fitted a pacemaker type thing that keeps his resting rate in the mid 50's, and he says that since that day hes "never felt so s**t" and has had to quit running because he feels so strange all the time.
How sad!

It would take a lot of persuasion to get me to agree to that...
Mine is down in the 40's at complete rest, and can occasionally dip into the 30's in my sleep, and no matter how nuts I go with exercise it peaks at 150. Some of it is hereditary from my Dad's side, and some of it due to a life of cycling - either way, I fear the day some smart arriss GP decides that I too need a defib thing. I'll tell them to sod off if they do, at least while i'm still active and feel ok.
When I was younger and fitter, mine was at 34 bpm (and maximum was 200 bpm). I'm sure that doctors might have been worried by that. They did seem a bit concerned when they looked at my ECGs during my clotting episodes...

Hmm - I just read THIS ARTICLE on bradycardia (low heart rate)... Apparently, it can cause syncope (fainting) - I have a history of that!
 

Bill Gates

Guest
Location
West Sussex
A friend of mine is 82, still runs marathons and has (now had) done so for 60 odd years. As a result his heart rate was astonishingly low, well in the 30's at rest.

His GP noted this during a medical and referred him to a cardiologist, despite my chums protestations that he felt tip-top. Next thing he knows they've fitted a pacemaker type thing that keeps his resting rate in the mid 50's, and he says that since that day hes "never felt so s**t" and has had to quit running because he feels so strange all the time.

Mine is down in the 40's at complete rest, and can occasionally dip into the 30's in my sleep, and no matter how nuts I go with exercise it peaks at 150. Some of it is hereditary from my Dad's side, and some of it due to a life of cycling - either way, I fear the day some smart arriss GP decides that I too need a defib thing. I'll tell them to sod off if they do, at least while i'm still active and feel ok.

You don't state specifically what your heart and lung problems are, but good luck. The weakness sounds alarming.
That really gets me annoyed. Bloody stupid G P s know jack sh1t about athletes. It's known by everyone on here what my feelings are on this subject. Let's face it anyone with a degree albeit a medical degree are only as good as what they are taught. And the guidelines you know their establishment bible that justifies poisoning people with drugs they don't want or need are based on a false premise. Tell the dodgy bastards to eff off. That's what I've done and I've never felt better
 

AuroraSaab

Senior Member
I would have a good look at the meds you are taking to see if any have the effect of slowing heart rate rises. If you haven't got the leaflet that comes with them you can usually find the guidelines by googling the medicine.
 

wonderloaf

Über Member
Location
Hampshire
How sad!

It would take a lot of persuasion to get me to agree to that...

When I was younger and fitter, mine was at 34 bpm (and maximum was 200 bpm). I'm sure that doctors might have been worried by that. They did seem a bit concerned when they looked at my ECGs during my clotting episodes...

Hmm - I just read THIS ARTICLE on bradycardia (low heart rate)... Apparently, it can cause syncope (fainting) - I have a history of that!
That explains a few things, my resting rate is around 43 bpm and I sometimes feel faint if I get up out of a chair too quickly. My GP said it's and age thing and also because I'm quite fit due to the cycling and not to worry, but now I'm not too sure ....
 

vickster

Legendary Member
That explains a few things, my resting rate is around 43 bpm and I sometimes feel faint if I get up out of a chair too quickly. My GP said it's and age thing and also because I'm quite fit due to the cycling and not to worry, but now I'm not too sure ....
Do you have low blood pressure too, also a cause of postural hypotension
 
Top Bottom