New bike or stick with old

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by AndyCarolan, 10 May 2010.

  1. AndyCarolan

    AndyCarolan Do you smell fudge?

    Location:
    Norwich
    As im getting more into riding and no longer have a car, im thinking perhaps about getting a new bike.

    Currently im using an old Carrera which although is a nice bike to ride, its a bit dated in a few areas... most notably brakes which are traditional low-pro cantilevers.

    I also find the lack of suspension on the front forks a bit jarring on my wrists after a while especially since fitting the cityjets (which I love!).

    The type of riding I do is currently mostly road based so I think I would be best looking for a hybrid. I also have the intention of using it for cycling holidays so would be hoping to fit panniers to it. Budget for the new bike would (probably) be between £500-£600

    The other option is tidying up the Carrera by upgrading the brakes somehow and repainting the frame perhaps :/
     
  2. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Man or Moose!

    Location:
    Manchester
    Suspension would just sap energy from you when riding on the road. Try getting some padded gloves or something if your arms are feeling the road buzz.

    The brakes, try sticking some better brake pads on them before splashing out on a whole nw brake system. If this doesnt help, then you can always upgrade the calipers and keep the brake blocks as spares (assuming they are compatible with the new brakes.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    AndyCarolan

    AndyCarolan Do you smell fudge?

    Location:
    Norwich
    Thanks for the reply Robert!

    I understand about the brake shoe and gloves, I will take a look on Wiggle and see what thye have :biggrin:
     
  4. if it were me, I'd stick with the old one. Contrary to what the marketing people tell you, you don't need anything better than canti brakes. And you certainly don't need suspension on something you use on the road. If it's ok to ride and you're enjoying it, save your money.
     
  5. jimboalee

    jimboalee New Member

    Location:
    Solihull
    New bike, new bike, new bike!!!! :evil:
     
  6. numbnuts

    numbnuts Legendary Member

    Location:
    North Baddesley
    I think you need n+2 road bike and MTB :evil:
     
  7. Norm

    Norm Guest

    I'd never suggest that someone didn't get a new bike, but I would have a look at the lower end MTB's first. Some of the cheaper ones have pretty ropey suspension and they weigh a tonne.

    That said, in your price range, there are some decent bits of kit out there. I have a Giant Talon 3, it cost about £450, comes with front suspension and decent off road tyres and has done excellent service. I've only done about 800 miles this year (I have other bikes, you see :evil: ) but I've done 50+ miles in a day on/off road and had no comfort issues at all. It also does occasional service in a local MTB area (Swinley Forest if you fancy a Google) and carries me up / along / down most things.

    It's good fun and, despite what some would have you believe, it works ok on the road. With the right pedalling technique (sit down and spin, don't bother standing on the pedals), the front forks take very little, if any, energy. They are heavier, probably a couple of extra kilos strapped to the front of the bike but the benefit is that weight helps absorb the bumps.

    I can ride that bike as fast as I like along river banks and on cycle tracks, whereas my other rigid bikes have a limited speed because of the punishment the surface inflicts on me. About an hour ago, I noticed that I only ride the asphalted cycle track into town at about 10mph because the surface is impossible at anything higher without suspension.

    The Talon comes with disk brakes, which work considerably better in the wet and are, generally, cleaner and easier to live with, IMO. Mine are cable operated which, again, many frown at but they've served my needs in a very simple manner without the faff of hydraulics.

    Your Carrera might well be adaptable, with decent gloves, maybe bar-ends and an upgrade to the brakes, but I'd certainly put in a vote for a mid-range MTB, even if you seldom leave the tarmac.

    Just don't say *spit* hybrid, ok? :biggrin:
     
  8. OP
    OP
    AndyCarolan

    AndyCarolan Do you smell fudge?

    Location:
    Norwich
    Thanks for hte replies guys. I will have to give it some thought as I do occasionally ride down some rough tracks and suspension that can be locked off (in a similar way to the forks on Helens bike... forgotten what brand they are) would be a welcome addition I think. Ok, so maybe an MTB and not a hybr*d then norm ;)
     
  9. Plax

    Plax Veteran

    Location:
    Wales
    If you are mostly road based I'd stick with a hybrid. You'll only waste money (or time converting it to a hybrid) buying different tyres or something if you go the MTB route. See if it is worth while adding ergo grips etc on your current bike first, and if you really don't like the canti's you can probably pick up some V brakes from ebay cheaply.

    If you like Carrera's, Mr Plax has got a Subway 2 which is a very good bike, we got it for £240 by ordering it online and picking it up in store when they had 20% off selected carrera bikes.
     
  10. RecordAceFromNew

    RecordAceFromNew Swinging Member

    Location:
    West London
    Apart from padded mitts/gloves, some nice Ergon grips can make a huge difference. They are firm yet soft and spread loads onto hands in a very comfortable way.
     
  11. Norm

    Norm Guest

    Go and try some MTB's with front suspenders, Andy, see what you reckon. I think you can get some nice kit for £500-£600, which will handle any roads, paths and tracks that you want to throw it at. It's up to you whether you want to pay the price of the extra weight.

    I love riding the MTB, I don't need to think about routes in the way that I do with the rigid bikes. Of course, the rigid bikes are lots quicker on the road but that's the pay off.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    AndyCarolan

    AndyCarolan Do you smell fudge?

    Location:
    Norwich
    I have some pretty squishy grips on the bike at the mo, but I do think some gel gloves would certainly help a bit. Any particular brand in mind?, ive looked on Wiggle, but I think its something that needs to be tried on before buying
     
  13. OP
    OP
    AndyCarolan

    AndyCarolan Do you smell fudge?

    Location:
    Norwich
    Ive had a quick try of Helen's bike and although its way too small for me, i can see the benefit of the suspension. Even with it locked off, it still offers a small amount of cushioning over potholes :smile:
     
  14. Tynan

    Tynan Veteran

    Location:
    e4
    if your hand sare troubling you, I'd think about the fit/setup, ie you're possible be putting too much weight onto your hands and wrists
     
  15. OP
    OP
    AndyCarolan

    AndyCarolan Do you smell fudge?

    Location:
    Norwich
    Its not my wrists, its just the road vibration... Im very comfortable on the bike other than that. Its been worse since putting the City Jets on the bike, but thats expected. I think I just need to get some jelly gloves :biggrin:
     
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