New Di2 battery

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by J_H1026, 5 Dec 2018.

Tags:
  1. J_H1026

    J_H1026 Active Member

    My trusty Di2 battery has finally given up the ghost and whilst I'm mildly annoyed at the cost of replacing it (I was hoping they'd have come down in price!) I'm now faced with a choice. Do I just replace it, like for like (SM-BTR2) or do I buy the new BT-DN 110? More importantly, I've read on an Amazon review that I may have to update the battery software if I buy the DN110 or can I just plug it into my 6870 Di2 set? I don't have any wireless device on my set up.

    Thanks!
     
  2. I use the old SM BTR2. I do not need any of the new functions of the newer battery, so why pay more for something you do not need?
     
  3. JhnBssll

    JhnBssll Über Member

    Location:
    Suffolk
    Yeah, unless you plan to use bluetooth at some point I wouldn't bother. Alternatively, open it up and put new cells in or find someone that can do it for you... They're standard lithium ion cells, think they're 14430 form factor.


    View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_yx-hnqjfTc
     
  4. OP
    OP
    J_H1026

    J_H1026 Active Member

    Thanks for the link and posts. I reckon I can replace those batteries!
     
    JhnBssll likes this.
  5. smutchin

    smutchin Cat 6 Racer

    Location:
    The Red Enclave
    I’m planning on upgrading to the DN-110 when mine needs replacing (hopefully not for a while yet). Main reason is that I quite like the idea of synchro shift. But I don’t quite like the idea enough to upgrade before it’s necessary.
     
  6. JhnBssll

    JhnBssll Über Member

    Location:
    Suffolk
    I haven't tried the full syncho setting yet but use the semi synchro mode on both bikes all the time, its really handy :okay:

    Anyone following the instructions to replace the cells themselves should be super careful with lithium ion cells; we use them all the time at work and have all received the relevant training for handling them but still we had an incident a few months ago whereby a technician slipped and punctured one with a screwdriver resulting in an instant high temperature fire and minor burns. Would have been far worse if we didnt have the equipment on hand to immediately deal with it.

    Be careful handling them and always tape the ends up with electrical tape before disposing of old cells, even if you think they're dead :okay:
     
    Elybazza61 likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice