"New" wheels

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Maggie's got a new set of wheels!

Well, second hand, but they seem to be in good condition, taut and free-rolling. Picked them up from ebay for 35 quid locally, they came off a Pinarello Quattro so not too shabby at all!

Kept my stock Element wheels for the bike's original tyres, therefore I've got a proper fast all-rounder for tours, winter training, summer canals etc, and a flat bar road bike for when the mood takes me!

Cheers

Stu

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defy-one

Guest
What are the quicks like? I'm leaning towards a Giant rapid atm, anything except a sirrus!!!!!
 
OP
Cyclist33

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
What are the quicks like? I'm leaning towards a Giant rapid atm, anything except a sirrus!!!!!
I love mine although have not tried Sirrus or Rapid. I think the Rapid is an actual flat bar road bike? Whereas the Quick is inherently not, although mine has a flat bar and goes on the road with 700c wheels and 23mm slicks.

12/48's the highest gear ratio, you're on a Defy 1 so might be a bit low? But good for touring.

Quick. Very comfortable. Pretty light. Versatile. Edgy looks. Ticks all my boxes!

Stu
 
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Cyclist33

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Nope - put them where they're of the most use to your style of riding is what I say. Personally I would put them on the bar ends though and have some sort of cheap tri bar where you've currently got yours. More hand positions that way.
Yes I concur. But if one doesn't have tri bars... it's an option. The benefit of any right angle bar along the handlebar should be obvious, b'n'y - changing the hand position. Anyone who had looked at previous photos of mine would see the bar ends used to be on the ends. I've just changed them for a bit of variety, and also I found them not so comfortable towards the end of longer rides as I do when they're inboard. Also, inboard, I can tuck in out of the air a bit more than I can when they're 580mm apart, which at least gives an impression of speed and certainly has enabled me to re-catch roadsters who've scalped me.

I was being ironic saying "is it the law?" - beyond the basic setup of a bike, what you do with setting it to suit your own preferences is an individual thing.
 
The benefit of any right angle bar along the handlebar should be obvious, b'n'y - changing the hand position.
you won't get a good hand position with the bar ends there as your wrists will be at an awkward angle - and it certainly won't give you an aero benefit - regardless of what effect you think it might be having. Just put them back on the ends of the bars and we'll say no more about it...
 
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Cyclist33

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
you won't get a good hand position with the bar ends there as your wrists will be at an awkward angle - and it certainly won't give you an aero benefit - regardless of what effect you think it might be having. Just put them back on the ends of the bars and we'll say no more about it...
Er, nope! Not until I get a pair of tri bars, anyway. I do have a larger-gauge and slightly longer pair of bar ends that would be handy inboard, but a) they're a bit slippy (any advice on that?) and b) the handlebar's not wide enough to support them.

If it's the "first time" you've ever seen bar ends there (it isn't in my case btw, I knew a very committed long distance rider who had such on one of his bikes), how do you suppose to comment with any authority on the matter of comfort or pace, when it is I who have ridden this bike with the same bar ends both outboard and inboard, and therefore know what works for me?!
 
If it's the "first time" you've ever seen bar ends there (it isn't in my case btw, I knew a very committed long distance rider who had such on one of his bikes), how do you suppose to comment with any authority on the matter of comfort or pace, when it is I who have ridden this bike with the same bar ends both outboard and inboard, and therefore know what works for me?!
The clue is in the name - bar 'ends'. On the ends of a bar, they serve a purpose - they don't serve any practical purpose where you have them. If you want to be more 'aero', just move your hand position inwards and grip the bars nearer to the stem.

Your long distance friend probably had a pair of Spinaci bars - which are a very different kettle of aquatic creatures....
 
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Cyclist33

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
The clue is in the name - bar 'ends'. On the ends of a bar, they serve a purpose - they don't serve any practical purpose where you have them. If you want to be more 'aero', just move your hand position inwards and grip the bars nearer to the stem.

Your long distance friend probably had a pair of Spinaci bars - which are a very different kettle of aquatic creatures....
No - he had a pair of cheap battered old aluminium bar ends and had them arranged inboard in a similar position to mine.

I'm really not sure what the opposition is to them inboard. Anything such as this that allows one to vary hand placement during a longer ride is helpful. I don't understand why you think it wouldn't be comfortable. It's just like putting one's hand on them when they're outboard, except they're inboard.

Hurrah for humans' ability to adapt and experiment and to find what suits them.
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
TBH, having used aero bar's I cannot conceive of those bar ends being comfortable or stable in that position, but if you like it....... carry on.
 
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