Newbie commuter tyre help please!

Kosh

New Member
Hi, just took the plunge and started commuting the 14miles to work & back each day.
I have already got a Mountain bike, which had been more or less sitting in the shed since purchase nearly 5 years ago!
It's nothing special, just a hardtail raleigh 26" mountain bike.
The tyres however are obviously designed for off road use are are very knobbley!
I've recently picked up this mag (well overpriced!) called Ride to Work. It mentions briefly in it to "fit nice fast XC style tyre around 1.75 to 2in" (perfect jargon for the begginers its aimed at!)

So I'm going to b shopping at Halfords or Go Outdoors - what actual tyre should I buy & will it make ANY real difference to whats on it now??

Thanks for reading,

Kosh.
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
Schwalbe City Jet tyres get good comments!

Yes it will make a difference, slicks pumped up to max pressure will make you faster for a given effort due to less rolling resistance.
 

Kestevan

Last of the Summer Winos
Location
Holmfirth.
+lots on the City Jets - Cracking commuting tyre at a reasonable price. Go for the 1.5 x 26 and you'll think you're riding a different bike.

I'd also have a look at Wiggle or Chain reaction for the tyres, probably much cheaper than Halfrauds (see the link in the "support CC" tab above and not only will you be getting good tyres at reasonable price but you'll also be helping keep these boards afloat :whistle: )
 

killiekosmos

Über Member
I've got Continental Travel Contacts on my hardtail Raleigh MTB, converted for commuting. Slick in middle with a little bit of tread at sides for occasional off-road.
 
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Kosh

New Member
City Jets it is then!
Yeah, your right they're £17.99 at Halfords compaired to as low as £11.99 anywhere else.

In terms of inner tubes will I need new ones?
Also in the city Jets is it 1.9 or 1.5 on the 26"s?

These are coming up cheap at Go Outdoors how do they compare?
Raleigh Streetwise Tyre- 26 x 1.50 - Black

Thanks for all your help guys!
 

4F

Active member of Helmets Are Sh*t Lobby
Location
Suffolk.
Kosh said:
In terms of inner tubes will I need new ones?
Also in the city Jets is it 1.9 or 1.5 on the 26"s?
What size tyres do you have now 26 x ????? Depending on what you have will depend on what size you can go to and whether the current inner tubes will fit
 
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Kosh

New Member
The tyre size at the moment is 26x1.95
the offer at wiggle for complete set looks to b on 26x1.5 only, can I still go for these??

Thanks
 

Mike!

Veteran
Location
Suffolk
Yep get 26 x 1.5 and personally i'd get three new tubes (1 as a spare to carry). Recently made this change on my old MTB and it's so much better on road and still fine on hard tracks across some heathland i use!
 
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Kosh

New Member
Great advice everyone, off to wiggle to order these babies!!
 

HJ

Cycling in Scotland
Location
Auld Reekie
Kosh said:
...
I've recently picked up this mag (well overpriced!) called Ride to Work. It mentions briefly in it to "fit nice fast XC style tyre around 1.75 to 2in" (perfect jargon for the begginers its aimed at!)

So I'm going to b shopping at Halfords or Go Outdoors - what actual tyre should I buy & will it make ANY real difference to whats on it now??

Thanks for reading,

Kosh.
Some of these mags really are a waste of money, written by people who don't understand their target market. It the risk of making the same mistake, see the late Sheldon Brown for everything you ever wanted to know (and more) about bicycle tyres...

Hope that helps :blush:
 
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Kosh

New Member
Ok, the tyres arrived from Wiggle. fitted them on went for a ride.
Problem- on a smooth surface the bike was jumping up and down as I rode, after I looked into it, the tyre is at different heights throughout the rim.
Ive took them off (spent 4 hours) found that If i raised it in one place it would be down elsewhere, any ideas what's going on. Remember this is all totally new to me!!
I took a pic to show u what I mean, but if I have trouble uploading it from behind our office firewall, heres a description - theres a line that runs around the rim about 10mm from it the logos & specs run beneath it, when your looking at the whole wheel you can clearly see that usually in one place this line get significantly nearer to the rim. IF I deflate the tyre pull it about a bit in that area, inflate it a bit, pull it about a bit more- finally inflate, the 'flat spot' will be less or gone BUT it normally appears elsewhere on the rim.
I've made sure the 'band' that protects the inner tube from the spokes is in as much of the ctre as possible, but it does move out of place when innertube/tyre is worked on (not entirely convinced that this is the problem anyway)

Hope thats enough for someone to PLEASE help me!
Thanks
Kosh (with very sore fingers now!)
 
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Kosh

New Member
Ok, pic didn't work but will email it to anyone who needs it to help me out.

Any advice on this would be greatly appreciated!

Kosh
 
HJ said:
Some of these mags really are a waste of money, written by people who don't understand their target market. :
I picked up one of those cycle to work mags in WH Smiths (not to buy) and its just a load of old recycled Cycling plus reviews and storys

Simon
 

rh100

Well-Known Member
Put talcum powder around the edge of the tyre and rub it into the bead, this will lubricate it a bit. Pump the tyre up a bit at a time, and massage the tyre where necessary to get it in line, then pump it up to maximum pressure marked on the side wall and you may find it sort of pops into place.

FromSheldon Brown:

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Inflating the Tire
Once the tire is fully installed on the rim, you can inflate it, but it my not be as round as it should be. If it isn't, it is usualy because the tire needs to be "seated" so that it sits at the same depth in the rim all the way around.
You are less likely to have a problem seating your tire if you have the wheel off of the ground before you start. If the tire is completely flat and is sitting on the ground with the weight of the bike on it, the part that is at the bottom is likely to seat incorrectly.
Generally, if your bike has quick release brakes, it's best to inflate the tire before putting the wheel back on the bike. If you don't have quick release brakes, though, it's easier to install the wheel before pumping up the tire.
It's best to start by inflating the tire just enough that it takes shape, maybe 20-30 psi, and to check that it is seated properly before full inflation. Check the seating by spinning the wheel and watching the tire. Once you're sure the tire is properly seated, inflate it to full pressure.
Seating the Tire
Once the tire is inflated, you may see that it is not as round as the rim is. Usually this will take the form of having most of the circumference of the tire in the correct place, but there will likely be one place where the tire either bulges out too far, or dips inward toward the rim. It may do this on only one side.
Most tires have a "witness line" moulded into each sidewall. This is a narrow ridge of rubber running around the side of the tire, just outside of the rim. Spinning the wheel and observing the witness line will help you locate the place where the seating might be off. Note, it could be OK on one side of the tire but not the other.
Seating A Bulging Tire

If one part of the tire bulges out farther than the rest, deflate it right away or it may explode with a loud bang! Manually re-arrange the tire to get it centered on the rim before re-inflating it. Make sure the tire bead isn't sitting on top of part of the inner tube.
If the bulge is right at the valve, this usually indicates that the tire is sitting on the reinforcing patch at the base of the valve. Completely deflate the tire, and push the valve up into the tire with your thumb, while pressing the tire down around it, then pull the valve back down before inflating. Seating a Tire that Dips Inward

If your tire dips inward at one spot, it is usually a sign of an unusually tight fit. This may make it a bit of a struggle to install the tire, but it also means that you can get away with considerable overinflation with no risk of blowing the tire off the rim. Indeed, the best way to seat a "dipping" tire is by temporariliy overinflating it until it "pops" into position. In some cases it may be beneficial to lubricate the side of the tire. This can be done with soapy water, but I usually use spray window cleaner for this, because it doesn't leave a soapy residue on the braking surface of the rim.
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