Non cycle rider

Pockpaul

Regular
Location
East Yorkshire
Hi all,

Currently a non cycle rider but considering taking this up for my retirement. I’m open to any suggestions along the way and at the moment thinking I may enjoy some credit card touring. Budget for the bike healthy and open for suggestions of type of bike.
My original thought was to purchase an E Bike, but now unsure. I like the sound of the Rohloff gears with a belt and possibly a titanium frame? But not discounted a R-Müller E Bike with a 1000w battery.
I’m sure there is a good argument for and against E Bikes and to be honest I seem to change my mind on a daily basis !
My fitness isn’t too bad and I’m average weight for my size.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Too many options really to advise. Need to consider what sort of cycling you will be doing. Do you have any friends/relatives/neighbors with bikes that you can try? I would suggest buying cheap and/or second hand to get you started. You will quickly gain experience and you can join the N+1 club.

Good luck
 
Too many options really to advise. Need to consider what sort of cycling you will be doing. Do you have any friends/relatives/neighbors with bikes that you can try? I would suggest buying cheap and/or second hand to get you started. You will quickly gain experience and you can join the N+1 club.

Good luck
This is good advice. Start cheap & simple and see what lights your fires.

As a solo tourer one of the issues is bike security. A Titanium frame with an easily identifiable Rohloff hub might be very attractive to bike thieves.

When I started biking again my tastes went from gentle recreation to a bit of credit-card touring to a bit of fully-loaded touring, to commuting and general utility cycling (sold the car) to now where I'll go as off-road, as off-grid as I can. If I'd followed the urge to buy a new bike in the beginning I'd have been limiting my horizons as I simply cannot afford different bikes for different things.

In any case, welcome & good luck!
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
I would suggest starting with a non suspension, hybrid or city style bike. Strongly consider a womens womens version for learning to ride. Get gloves, helmet and lock and off you go.
Once you know how to ride you will be much better placed to judge size/weight/type.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
What they said (except the helmet - see the helmet debate thread). Rohloff and titanium are dribblingly gorgeous but if it's too identifiable then as mentioned above, it's very nickable. If you buy a bike that you can't afford to replace, then insure it against theft - and read the terms carefully and comply, because there may be restrictions on locks or parking locations or times.

I'm not convinced by belts. I've not owned one but I've seen belted bikes up close, riding alongside. The belts last well, are clean and don't need lube but can't be split, so need a frame which splits on the drive side (to get the belt on/off), can't be repaired with a split link and fewer shops stock them than single speed chains. There's another drawback I forget. Edit: I remembered: the hub gear driver is a different design, so less tested and rarer to get as spare.

Unless I decided I wanted an ebike, I'd start with a secondhand touring bike and try it and figure out what I wanted different next time. Actually, that's what I did.

Good luck and keep rolling!
 
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MichaelW2

Veteran
How much of a non cycle rider are you?
Can you ride
Did you ride as a child
When did you stop?

Helmet and glove suggestion was to protect against the increased risk of a learner just coming off the bike. Experienced riders can decide for themselves.
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
Helmet and glove suggestion was to protect against the increased risk of a learner just coming off the bike. Experienced riders can decide for themselves.
Look, please let's take this to the debate thread but helmetting is not even clearly beneficial for child learners and they're much more fall-prone - I think it was Tim Gill who summarised it.

Gloves I can't see much drawback to, though. You can choose how much of the hand to protect and they don't make hands significantly bigger or heavier. I still ride without, though, so don't put off rides because you've not got them with you.
 
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