Norco Fluid 2 HT NX Eagle 2019

Grendel

Veteran
A review I published on my blog...

My latest Cycle to Work acquisition was the Norco Fluid 2 mountain bike, and I’ve been testing it for the last couple of weeks and have to say I’m impressed. In recent years I’ve been using folding mountain bikes, but I’ve been eyeing up some of the newer designs for a while and the pull of this was just too much.
dsc_0430.jpg


With so many folk being into bikepacking these days this seems like a design that would be more than suitable as there’s a massive reach on the handlebars, which is ideal for mounting bags. The first thing which caught my eye though was the gears, with the tiny single ring chainset and dinner plate sized rear cassette. As someone used to having a range of between 21 to 27 speeds this would be somewhat of a change, but I was interested in seeing how it would fare. In use I’ve found it to be a fairly decent range for climbing, and can manage some pretty steep hills with perhaps a tiny bit left if required. Descending and on the flat is a different matter though and I’ve found myself spinning out, leading to me laying off slightly, but I can still get a reasonable speed from it. With 27.5 wheels and 2.8″ tyres it’s not a fat bike, but its fatter than I’m used to, and it’s worth remembering that you’ll need larger replacement tubings in your repair kit.

dsc_0438.jpg

Chainset detail and flat pedals



dsc_0431.jpg

Rear brake disc and gear cassette

The hydraulic disc brakes are sharp and effective, and the 120mm suspension is easily switched to locked for running on roads. One of the most surprising features for me was the dropper post, something I’d not used previously, and apparently not a standard feature in many bikes in this price range. Operated by a handlebar mounted thumb switch, it allows you to raise the seatpost while riding and is rapidly changed with practice, although it does take a bit of getting used to when first ridden. Attempting to change gear and finding the seat dropping can be a bit alarming! If there is one negative I’ve got about the bike it’s that the saddle is rather unforgiving and it’s possibly the first component I’d swap out.

dsc_0435.jpg

Dropper post

The lack of front derailleur gives it a clean, uncluttered look and the small chain set gives a higher clearance than you would get on a traditional two/three ring set up. Retailing at around £1000, all in all this is a lot of bike for the money (more so if you use cycle-to-work or similar) and it’s worth serious consideration if you are looking to upgrade.

dsc_0434.jpg
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Looks nice - droppers are for going down steep descents !!
 

Spiderweb

Not So Special One
Location
North Yorkshire
You don’t mention the forks, quite important on a mountain bike.
SR Suntour have quite a bad rep, what do you think?

As above dropper posts are for difficult steep descending, drop the post, stretch your arms and get your body weight as far back over the back wheel as possible.
 
OP
Grendel

Grendel

Veteran
First time I'd used one, getting used to the dropper now.
I'm not a forks geek, so couldn't possibly give a comparison with other forks.
It's outside my area of expertise. I'm afraid.
 

Threevok

This space available to rent
Location
South Wales
Some of the higher range Suntours are on a par with low-mid range Rockshox.

Unfortunately, so is the price and I am not sure how easy they are to service in comparison.
 

Tom B

Über Member
Location
Lancashire
A review I published on my blog...

My latest Cycle to Work acquisition was the Norco Fluid 2 mountain bike.....

The first thing which caught my eye though was the gears, with the tiny single ring chainset and dinner plate sized rear cassette. As someone used to having a range of between 21 to 27 speeds this would be somewhat of a change, but I was interested in seeing how it would fare. In use I’ve found it to be a fairly decent range for climbing, and can manage some pretty steep hills with perhaps a tiny bit left if required. Descending and on the flat is a different matter though and I’ve found myself spinning out, leading to me laying off slightly, but I can still get a reasonable speed from it.
This 1x thing is what puts me off a new Mtb.

Surely it's just like riding everywhere in the granny ring. I tend to ride out to whatever off road stuff I'm doing so 20 or 30 miles of in road riding isn't unusual. So I don't want to be spinning out at 12mph or hammering away for an hour at max cadence.

I bought a FS Boardman Team Fs a couple of years ago. Largely because it was a great price and I'd never had a FS.I chose the Team rather than the Pro largely because it was 2x.

There is a downside to the 2x.. The chain drop is frequent and annoying, the fsa chainrings seem allergic to the chain some days.

A hard tail is probably more suited to my needs but I want something with some decent length in the gears.... What was wrong with 8x3!!!
 
Last edited:

Oceancalm

New Member
A review I published on my blog...

My latest Cycle to Work acquisition was the Norco Fluid 2 mountain bike, and I’ve been testing it for the last couple of weeks and have to say I’m impressed. In recent years I’ve been using folding mountain bikes, but I’ve been eyeing up some of the newer designs for a while and the pull of this was just too much.
View attachment 474012

With so many folk being into bikepacking these days this seems like a design that would be more than suitable as there’s a massive reach on the handlebars, which is ideal for mounting bags. The first thing which caught my eye though was the gears, with the tiny single ring chainset and dinner plate sized rear cassette. As someone used to having a range of between 21 to 27 speeds this would be somewhat of a change, but I was interested in seeing how it would fare. In use I’ve found it to be a fairly decent range for climbing, and can manage some pretty steep hills with perhaps a tiny bit left if required. Descending and on the flat is a different matter though and I’ve found myself spinning out, leading to me laying off slightly, but I can still get a reasonable speed from it. With 27.5 wheels and 2.8″ tyres it’s not a fat bike, but its fatter than I’m used to, and it’s worth remembering that you’ll need larger replacement tubings in your repair kit.

View attachment 474013
Chainset detail and flat pedals



View attachment 474014
Rear brake disc and gear cassette

The hydraulic disc brakes are sharp and effective, and the 120mm suspension is easily switched to locked for running on roads. One of the most surprising features for me was the dropper post, something I’d not used previously, and apparently not a standard feature in many bikes in this price range. Operated by a handlebar mounted thumb switch, it allows you to raise the seatpost while riding and is rapidly changed with practice, although it does take a bit of getting used to when first ridden. Attempting to change gear and finding the seat dropping can be a bit alarming! If there is one negative I’ve got about the bike it’s that the saddle is rather unforgiving and it’s possibly the first component I’d swap out.

View attachment 474015
Dropper post

The lack of front derailleur gives it a clean, uncluttered look and the small chain set gives a higher clearance than you would get on a traditional two/three ring set up. Retailing at around £1000, all in all this is a lot of bike for the money (more so if you use cycle-to-work or similar) and it’s worth serious consideration if you are looking to upgrade.

View attachment 474016

Are you selling it already or has someone pinched your pic’s?
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Norco-Fl...478668?hash=item1cd8636c0c:g:EpwAAOSwgJtdZkzk


If selling why?
 
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