On the subject of train tickets

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by Arch, 19 Aug 2012.

  1. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    After we have a week away the week after next, I'll be driving us back to NT's and then getting the train home from Manchester. Logistics mean I won't have a return ticket to use the return portion of. His nearest station has a tiny ticket office, which should be open when I need to go and get my preferred train, but I'm sure I've been there when the ticket office ought to be open, but isn't. I just don't quite trust it!

    So, I know that if there's no facility to buy a ticket, you buy it on the train. The journey is in two parts, changing at Stalybridge. I've frequently travelled all the way to Stalybridge with no sight of a conductor or inspector on the first leg. Am I suppose to go hunting for him? There's 13 minutes connection time at Stalybridge, which ought to be enough time to get to the ticket office, but if the train in is delayed, or the ticket office busy, it could get tight, and it's an hour's wait to the next train.

    My question is, would I be in trouble trying to buy my ticket for the whole journey on the second leg, if I hadn't seen a conductor on the first leg, or were concerned about not having time to leave the platform at Stalybridge?

    (Of course, I could simply order a single ticket in advance and have it posted to NT's, it's just that this will mean being restricted to a specific train, and I'd prefer to stay flexible, and there's no monetary advantage to buying in advance.... )

    I won't think about the fact that I sometimes don't even see a conductor on the second leg either, leaving the train companies open to losing the whole fare, should I be criminally minded...
     
  2. vernon

    vernon Harder than Ronnie Pickering

    Location:
    Meanwood, Leeds
    Buy an open single by post. There's no price difference between it and an on demand ticket and it's valid for all trains.
     
  3. mcshroom

    mcshroom Bionic Subsonic

    Location:
    Egremont, Cumbria
    Why not just get a standard ticket posted to NTs? You can get normal tickets for any train online.

    [eta] or what Vernon said faster[/eta]
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    Ah, I assumed one had to make a reservation, but if you can buy an open single...
     
  5. mcshroom

    mcshroom Bionic Subsonic

    Location:
    Egremont, Cumbria
    I've got normal 'anytime' tickets for the trip home from Tan Hill after the night ride which I ordered online :smile:
     
  6. Archie_tect

    Archie_tect De Skieven Architek... aka Penfold

    Location:
    Northumberland
    Won't buying at any time in advance save you money compared to the cost of the ticket bought during the journey?
     
  7. theclaud

    theclaud It's teeceegawnmaaaad

    Location:
    Swansea
    I wouldn't worry about getting into trouble, as you're not doing anything iffy. You're supposed to buy a ticket at the first opportunity, but in my book that doesn't include dashing around between platforms at connecting stations, even if there's time. But it needn't arise because you can buy all tickets in advance, not just "advance" ones, if you see what I mean. Anytime or off-peak singles don't restrict you to a specified train, even if you have made a seat reservation when you book. So if you're worried I'd go for buying online and getting your ticket sent to NT's.

    EDIT: as already advised while I typed too slowly...
     
  8. mcshroom

    mcshroom Bionic Subsonic

    Location:
    Egremont, Cumbria
    Depends on the line. My local line has a single layer of pricing, so a ticket from Whitehaven-Carlisle (for example) costs the same whether you buy it on the train or 12 weeks in advance. Surprisingly enough I always buy tickets on that line on the train.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    Ok done, but I'd welcome thoughts on the original question anyway, in case I find myself needing to make unexpected trips in future when the ticket office is shut...
     
  10. Jefferson Meriwether

    Jefferson Meriwether Über Member

    Location:
    Worthing
    If the ticket office is shut then there's no problems with you buying a ticket on the train. The vast majority of of conductors are happy to sell you a ticket even when the ticket office is open. Half the times I travel to Exeter I buy a ticket on the train & have never had a conductor be funny with me for not buying a ticket from the ticket office.

    I doubt there would be a problem buying a ticket during the 2nd leg of the journey; a quick explanation as to why you haven't already bought a ticket should suffice. If the conductor is a jobsworth they might grumble a bit but most conductors are happy to give you a ticket and take your money.
     
    theclaud likes this.
  11. vernon

    vernon Harder than Ronnie Pickering

    Location:
    Meanwood, Leeds
    No so much the line as the Train Company. Some lines have more than one company operating over them.

    I suspect that you are referring to Northern Rail which, as it happens is the sole operator on your line. I like their relaxed attitude to bikes on trains.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    Yes, while Stalybridge is a fairly small station, and the ticket office is (I think, I've only ever waited on the platform there), on the same side as the platform I use it's not directly on the platform, and it would still involve a trip up and down a ramp. And at the big station like York, if you got into platform 11, you'd have quite a trek over to the ticket office.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK

    They also have fabulously elderly range of rolling stock! I like the carriages like buses, with bench seats.
    They also have the highest gap between platform and train I've ever seen. Gawd help you if you've got dodgy knees!
     
  14. mcshroom

    mcshroom Bionic Subsonic

    Location:
    Egremont, Cumbria
    The bus like ones are actually buses with bigger engines and solid wheels. They are based on the old Leyland National bus, In fact the prototypes still looked like buses (with indicators :huh:): -
    [​IMG]

    They are getting scrapped before 2019 though as they don't meet disability access laws
     
  15. Sandra6

    Sandra6 Veteran

    Location:
    Cumbria
    Am I the only one who thinks managing to get to your destination on a train without encountering a conductor is a bonus?
    Personally I wouldn't go out of my way to buy a ticket, if they come and ask me to buy one I will - obviously - if they don't then I don't seek them out.
    Am I a bad person?!
     
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