Peugeot Tourmalet 1986 or 1987 model

keabo

Active Member
Location
Bury, Lancs
Here is my recently acquired Peugeot Tourmalet (shown as purchased).
588372


A bit of an odd one, as the paint is burgundy and the frame sticker says it's HLE tubing, whereas the catalogue from 1986 featuring this model shows it in tulip red paint and with Carbolite 103 tubing. Inspecting the frame and fork gives no reason to doubt that the paint is original, although the finish is very poor and there is lots of wear and tear too.

Here's an example of the paint finish.
588373


Anyway, it's all been apart and the components have cleaned up nicely.
588374


I do like these CLB brakes, very French and as far as I recall they work very well too.

The Helicomatic hub/freewheel are present and in good working order, although like the rest of the bike, in need of a serious clean.
588375


Although I have T-Cut and wax polished the frame and fork and they now look at least a little better, the top tube has a fair amount of damage to the paint which I need to work out a good way to deal with.
588376


There is minor chipping to other tubes but nothing too bad.

Very good advice from @smokeysmoo on the New Members thread about the bottomless pit of spending that these old bikes can turn into. I'm not thinking of trying to sell this bike, certainly not before I have enjoyed the experience of riding with non-aero cables and downtube shifters, but I can see the need to keep the costs down, given the values fetched on ebay for such bikes.

It's ~almost~ roadworthy again now, just needs tyres, bar tape and brake lever hoods to finish. Then I can take my time to find age-appropriate saddle and pedals.
 

biggs682

Smile a mile bike provider
Location
Northamptonshire
Welcome @keabo looks like a good project and they make good old workhorses once up and running.
What pedals do you want ?
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
That doesn't need much doing to it at all, it's mostly cosmetic by the looks of it. I should rub down the top tube to remove the rust and find a rattle can from an automotive store for a near match and spray it.
Remove the suicide levers for better braking.
That's it. Just enjoy.
 
OP
keabo

keabo

Active Member
Location
Bury, Lancs
@biggs682 I have put on the brand new toeclip & strap pedals I got with my Genesis Croix de Fer for now. I'll keep an eye out for some of those Maillard CX pedals that were fitted to these when new, or maybe some aluminium quill types. No rush really, I'll go to local cyclejumbles in search of bits like that. Thanks for the Peugeot links elsewhere!

@Cycleops good call on the rattle can, I think there is enough retouching to justify a spray repair. Touching it in with a brush is likely to look awful :smile:, which is not to say that my rattle can work is going to be wonderful. Suicide levers already gone, a past owner had drilled random holes in the levers, presumably attempting to save precious grams, and the suicide levers were horrible anyway. I picked up some Weinmann levers from Popup Bikes in Manchester that look good and haven't been molested.
588421


@T4tomo I hadn't spotted the date code on the hub - thanks. There are 86 codes on a few of the other components too. I guess Peugeot were assembling these in batches using whatever framesets were being manufactured at the time.
 
Here is my recently acquired Peugeot Tourmalet (shown as purchased).
View attachment 588372

A bit of an odd one, as the paint is burgundy and the frame sticker says it's HLE tubing, whereas the catalogue from 1986 featuring this model shows it in tulip red paint and with Carbolite 103 tubing. Inspecting the frame and fork gives no reason to doubt that the paint is original, although the finish is very poor and there is lots of wear and tear too.

Here's an example of the paint finish.
View attachment 588373

Anyway, it's all been apart and the components have cleaned up nicely.
View attachment 588374

I do like these CLB brakes, very French and as far as I recall they work very well too.

The Helicomatic hub/freewheel are present and in good working order, although like the rest of the bike, in need of a serious clean.
View attachment 588375

Although I have T-Cut and wax polished the frame and fork and they now look at least a little better, the top tube has a fair amount of damage to the paint which I need to work out a good way to deal with.
View attachment 588376

There is minor chipping to other tubes but nothing too bad.

Very good advice from @smokeysmoo on the New Members thread about the bottomless pit of spending that these old bikes can turn into. I'm not thinking of trying to sell this bike, certainly not before I have enjoyed the experience of riding with non-aero cables and downtube shifters, but I can see the need to keep the costs down, given the values fetched on ebay for such bikes.

It's ~almost~ roadworthy again now, just needs tyres, bar tape and brake lever hoods to finish. Then I can take my time to find age-appropriate saddle and pedals.
Is it Simplex?
 
OP
keabo

keabo

Active Member
Location
Bury, Lancs
Ooh, that's nice. I love the Peugeot graphics of that time. The Charge saddle suits it well.
 
OP
keabo

keabo

Active Member
Location
Bury, Lancs
I'm waiting for the arrival of a used front wheel matching the rear, but I couldn't resist a quick go on the old Pug today. A not-too-hilly 35km shakedown ride presented no problems with the bike at all. In fact it was really nice to ride, lovely responsive steering and handling, and very stable and easy to manoeuvre at low speed in heavy traffic and at over 40kph. Didn't take long to get the hang of the downtube shifters again, but it's pretty clear how much brakes (ergonomics and effectiveness) have improved in the intervening decades!
588731
 
OP
keabo

keabo

Active Member
Location
Bury, Lancs
I changed the blocks from some sawn-off cantilever ones to some traditional looking blocks from bankruptbikeparts. They're OK I think, they will lock the back wheel up with a bit of effort at the lever. Probably not as good as koolstop but safe enough. The lever ergonomics will just take a little getting used to after years of using ultra-comfy Shimano brifters. All part of the fun of 'vintage' riding I guess.

midlife, thanks for the MKS suggestion, just had a look at some on SJS Cycles - they are definitely in keeping with the bike. Not sure yet whether to persevere with toeclips or just stick on a set of PDM520s that I have in my parts bin. On the bike I had years ago the leather strap actually wore away the crank arm where it was in contact with it. Hence the lack of straps on the pedals I have fitted so far.
 

Astore

Active Member
That has scrubbed up nicely, I'm with T4tomo on the Koolstop salmons. They made a massive difference to the Modolo brakes on my Thompson. The OEM blocks were about as effective as a banana on a wet pavement. They were a bit noisy to start off, but are settling down now.
 

T4tomo

Guru
That has scrubbed up nicely, I'm with T4tomo on the Koolstop salmons. They made a massive difference to the Modolo brakes on my Thompson. The OEM blocks were about as effective as a banana on a wet pavement. They were a bit noisy to start off, but are settling down now.
agree. if you are keeping a vintage bike authentic, which you should, then period calipers or canti's and period levers you are stuck with, but brake block rubber compound can make a massive difference and sticking in modern rubber doesnt detract from authenticity, but makes a big difference to braking performance.
you can live with the odd dodgy gear shift on an old bike, but braking isn't an area to compromise on.

brave choice with the white bar tape btw, looks lovely but a labour of love keeping it white!
 
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