Problem with the rear wheel hub?

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by lulubel, 2 Aug 2012.

  1. lulubel

    lulubel Über Member

    Location:
    Malaga, Spain
    I've already posted about my wobbly cassette and have looked into and tried everything discussed in this thread.

    Nothing has worked. I've taken it off, put it on (with and without a spacer), made sure everything is lined up properly, checked that my 11-tooth sprocket and my hub are compatable. It's really, really tight - I mean extremely tight! - there's no chance that I'm not tightening the lockring enough.

    When I had the wheel off and the QR skewer out today, I wobbled the cassette again while holding both sides of the biggest sprocket, and I noticed that everything moved. Even the lockring moved relative to the hub.

    Would this happen if the problem was a loose cassette? Or is the outer part of the hub that the cassette fixes to moving relative to the inner part?

    Do I have a problem with the hub (which was brand new when I built the wheel), and if I do, what can I do about it (preferably that doesn't involve a new hub and rebuilding the %(*&ing wheel)?

    (It's a Shimano 105 hub, just like this one.)
     
  2. PpPete

    PpPete Guru

    Location:
    Chandler's Ford
    Shimano 105 hubs are cup & cone .... so they could well need tightening up - easiest on the side opposite the cassette.
     
  3. martint235

    martint235 Dog on a bike

    Location:
    Welling
    Yep sounds like the cones and as PpPete says it's easier to do the non-drive side. Remember what order you take things off the axle in though, I had to get the bike shop to put mine back together the first time I did this.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    lulubel

    lulubel Über Member

    Location:
    Malaga, Spain
    Thanks for the replies. I've just ordered some cone spanners.
     
  5. fossyant

    fossyant Ride It Like You Stole It!

    Location:
    South Manchester
    If the freehub is wobbling, but not the hub, then the retaining bolt for the freehub could be loose (this recently happened to my wife's bike) - in which case you will need a 10mm hex key (12mm for non-shimano hubs.) The bolt is a cylinder shape and is accessed via the drive side for shimano (non drive side for some others) - remove cones, axel and bearings, then put in the hex key to tighten.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    lulubel

    lulubel Über Member

    Location:
    Malaga, Spain
    I thought about that after I posted, when I read up on it a bit online. The rim hasn't got any lateral movement in it, so I think that's what it is. At least I'll still need the cone spanners, so I haven't wasted my money.
     
  7. Alien8

    Alien8 Senior Moment

    I thought the original problem was that the lockring was coming loose and after adjustment it's ok for a few 10s of miles but is then loose again?

    If that's the case then I don't see how it can be a (free) hub problem (assuming the hub/lockring threads are ok) - which presumably would be there all the time regardless of how far you tighten the lockring.

    Anyway, take the cassette off, grasp the free hub, and see if you can feel/see any lateral play with respect to the hub/axle.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    lulubel

    lulubel Über Member

    Location:
    Malaga, Spain
    Not exactly, no. The lockring was never coming loose. I could improve (but not totally prevent) the wobble initially by tightening the lockring, so I obviously wasn't tightening it quite far enough at first. Since then, the problem has become progressively worse and worse, and it's quite obviously not a problem with the cassette/lockring because I can now see the lockring move when I wobble the cassette.

    It probably isn't quite as bad as it feels because I have got a mega range cassette on a road bike, so the size of the 34 tooth large sprocket is drastically exagerating the looseness of the freehub.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice