1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Quick question -quick answer please

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by Mister Paul, 6 Jun 2008.

  1. Mister Paul

    Mister Paul Honky

    Location:
    North Somerset
    I've just taken the cassette off one of my bikes. Do I need to grease the spline before I pop the new cassette on?

    Thanks
     
  2. Gerry Attrick

    Gerry Attrick Lincolnshire Mountain Rescue Consultant

    I do very lightly. It helps to stop it seizing in place with salt spray etc.
     
  3. jags

    jags Über Member

    emm but then again whats to seize,i would not bother it will be fine .
     
  4. fossyant

    fossyant Ride It Like You Stole It!

    Location:
    South Manchester
    Same here - also stops any surface rust....bit of light greasing !!!
     
  5. dodgy

    dodgy Veteran

    Location:
    Wirral
    The cassette/spline interface isn't particularly known as a seize risk. Having said that, I routinely put copper grease between most metal interfaces on my bikes.

    Dave.
     
  6. Mister Paul

    Mister Paul Honky

    Location:
    North Somerset
    Right, that was easy. Thanks for the responses.

    Now to the jockey wheels-

    How do I know when they need replacing? There's some sideways movement in them. Is this normal?
     
  7. dodgy

    dodgy Veteran

    Location:
    Wirral
    Jockey Wheels are very forgiving, I've never replaced one yet anyway. There should be some sideways float.

    Dave.
     
  8. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    the jockey wheels' only job is to keep the chain aligned to the mech cage.
    If they do that successfully and rotate freely then they don't need replacing. If they had no teeth left at all then it would still work, but the chain might touch the sides of the mech cage. As long as it doesn't then they're fine.
     
  9. RedBike

    RedBike New Member

    Location:
    Beside the road
    Ignore Borj.

    There should be some movement 'float' in the jockey wheels. Without it you'd find your gears are much harder to index.

    When the jockey wheels are very worn you'll find your chain starts acting the fool and gets entangled in the rear mech. Although before this you'll probably notice your gears are slower changing.

    When you look at a worn jockey wheel the teeth will look spikey (Not bald).

    just found a good piccy
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Fab Foodie

    Fab Foodie hanging-on in quiet desperation ...

    Unless they look like the above and they cause no chain nastiness, then I'd not change them.

    I also grease splines... there's little reason for doing it other than corrosion protection.
     
  11. Mister Paul

    Mister Paul Honky

    Location:
    North Somerset
    Thanks again.

    Well, the cassette is on and the newly cleaned mech is drying in the shed. Tomorrow I predict that I won't have as easy a job when I fit the new chain and adjust the gears.
     
  12. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    as long as you haven't moved the front mech it should be fine. that's the only thing that's ever an arse to set up right.
     
  13. Mister Paul

    Mister Paul Honky

    Location:
    North Somerset
    That's what I'm worried about though. The front mech is ticking, and the cable doesn't go into it properly. So I'm going to have to reconnect it.
     
  14. bonj2

    bonj2 Guest

    'ticking' ?:angry: what's causing that?
    and how is the cable not going into it properly, is it because it's too stiff to shift up to a larger chainring? or is it just frayed?
     
  15. Mister Paul

    Mister Paul Honky

    Location:
    North Somerset
    the chain hits the mech on each revolution.

    And the cable doesn't go into the mech along the notch it should, but diagonally.