Rear tyre rubbing frame - dishing

Custom24

Über Member
Location
Oxfordshire
Hi
I noticed that my rear tyre is rubbing my Planet X RT58D frame. It's rubbed <1mm I'd say, so I'm not too worried about that for the moment.

But to stop it, I've had to re-dish my rear wheel so that my dishing tool shows about a 4mm gap on the drive side compared to the brake side. The drive side spokes are now pretty flat, but the wheel is now more or less centred in the frame.

It's possible that the wheel originally came like this, and that I introduced a problem the previous (and first) time I trued up my rear wheel, because I thought that the wheel was supposed to be centred on the hub.

Can anyone clarify on this for me? I don't really see the point in a dishing tool if it's centring in the frame that actually counts.
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
It's centering in the frame (ie between seatstays and chainstays) that counts and a dishing tool helps a wheel builder achieve that. Some bikes have assymetric chainstays.
 
Location
Loch side.
Hi
I noticed that my rear tyre is rubbing my Planet X RT58D frame. It's rubbed <1mm I'd say, so I'm not too worried about that for the moment.

But to stop it, I've had to re-dish my rear wheel so that my dishing tool shows about a 4mm gap on the drive side compared to the brake side. The drive side spokes are now pretty flat, but the wheel is now more or less centred in the frame.

It's possible that the wheel originally came like this, and that I introduced a problem the previous (and first) time I trued up my rear wheel, because I thought that the wheel was supposed to be centred on the hub.

Can anyone clarify on this for me? I don't really see the point in a dishing tool if it's centring in the frame that actually counts.
That equates to a 2mm error, which is exactly the thickness of a wheel washer. You sure you didn't mix up washers and spacers at some point and are now attempting to compensate with dishing?
 
OP
OP
Custom24

Custom24

Über Member
Location
Oxfordshire
That equates to a 2mm error, which is exactly the thickness of a wheel washer. You sure you didn't mix up washers and spacers at some point and are now attempting to compensate with dishing?
I meant it has rubbed <1mm of frame away. The error was actually a lot more because it had to move away from the centre to start rubbing. I recall the last time I trued my wheel checking afterwards the dish. I noticed it was off centre and thought that I had done that by true ing, so I "corrected" it. I now realise this was my mistake
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I often stop for tea
Location
Dumnoniorum
I find it easier to check dish by reversing the wheel in the jig rather than with a dishing tool. You can do the same in the frame: if, on turning the wheel round, it's rubbing the other side, then the wheel is out; if it touches the same side, the frame is out.
I'm assuming Planet-X don't sell frames with asymmetric stays to reduce dishing.
 

Nigelnightmare

Über Member
Have you measured the OLD?
If that's correct then it sounds like the hub wasn't spaced up correctly, as normally the rim is in the middle of the hub Locknut to locknut.
Unless you have asymmetric rear frame stays.
 
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