Rear Wheel Part 2

Glasgow44

Über Member
Hi there

Thanks to everyone who replied to my post. Just following on from my post, I find it really difficult to put my rear wheel back on the bike and have to really think about where the rear cogs go in terms of place with the chain, hangers, etc. This is even before I begin to tighten. Anyone else find this difficult?

Thanks in advance

J
 
Hi there

Thanks to everyone who replied to my post. Just following on from my post, I find it really difficult to put my rear wheel back on the bike and have to really think about where the rear cogs go in terms of place with the chain, hangers, etc. This is even before I begin to tighten. Anyone else find this difficult?

Thanks in advance

J
Do you mean how the chain goes over the sprockets and then through the idlers ?
If is that what you mean ? Then looking from the drive side at the rear sprockets the chain will form the shape of a letter S and on to the first idler, it will then reverse around the second idle towards the chain ring . Depending on what type of rear derailleur you have may affect the outcome . Some old derailleurs will have idlers which rotate around a central axle and will have to be rotated to tension the chain .
I hope this may help .
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Shift the chain to the second to smallest sprocket before dropping the wheel out - then you won't forget. Always find having on the second sprocket easier than the smallest as the chain won't be right near the frame and gives you a little more wriggle room.

Pull mech backwards, and slide in wheel. Practice makes perfect.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Rim brakes?
Before removing the wheel, open up the brake caliper. Some brake levers have push bolt to release the levers a little or on the caliper itself, there is a lever. Makes it little easier to feed the wheel into place. If very wide tyres, sometimes you just need to deflate the tyre until you get it past the brake caliper, the re-inflate once in position.
 

T4tomo

Veteran
So did a bloke near our work the other day, I was walking past and could hear him on the phone to his wife /partner who was talking him through it, so I helped him out and sent him on his way.

certainly having the derailleur left on smallest (or second smallest!) cog setting helps, I open the derailleur out a little and sort of roll the sprockets / wheel into place. having a disk brake makes it slightly trickier.

I also find sqeezing what ever brake it is on gently whilst tightening quick release skewer helps alignment
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Oh for the days when Steel frames had a little tang on the seatstay that you hooked the chain over keeping the mech in position whilst you removed/refitted the wheel.
 

weareHKR

Well-Known Member
When I have to take my back wheel off, I sometimes find it difficult to re-site it properly.
Ha ok right gotcha, yeah it can be a bit fiddly at first, you'll get the hang of it tho... :training:
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
Ensure that you've clicked the gears right down so that the chain is on the smallest sprocket (reiterating @T4tomo advice). Makes it a lot easier, taking wheel off and refitting.
 

Gunk

Veteran
Location
Oxford
Most of it said already, but always remove the wheel with the brake calipers released and the chain on the smallest cog.

The rear mech can be hinged back slightly to aid access, if the wheel is tight against the seat tube, then let the air out of the tyre to help with clearance.
 
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Dan77

Well-Known Member
Location
Worcester
I've been having some difficulty removing my rear wheel. Even got my finger trapped yesterday.

Easy on my other bike but the new one has a clutch system and no release for it so it's more difficult. Just need to get used to it and it should become easier. There are loads of youtube videos on removing rear wheels if you think you may be doing it incorrectly.
 
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