Recommendations For New Hybrid With Carbon Forks

woodbine

Well-Known Member
Location
Bristol, UK
I'm thinking of semi-retiring my 30 year old British Eagle MTB fitted with slick/road tyres. Looking for a hybrid type bike, but reluctant to give up the relative comfort of the old steel framed bike. Don't suppose new steel framed hybrids are available any more? If I list the sort of features I would prefer, would appreciate some suggestions please. Thanks

Comfortable - so I'm thinking not all ally - maybe carbon forks as a minimum
Budget £350 to £500
Gears - less if possible, but if it's 27 speed that's not a problem
Preferably Shimano running gear, brakes, etc
Suspension - none
Use - mainly road, occasional gravel, all weathers
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Are you happy with used? With many bikes sold out, you’ll struggle to get a new model with carbon forks for £500 right now (Or if ever going forwards as new bikes have simply got more costly for new with the same spec as say 5 years ago)
used, check out the Whyte R7s, which come with a double (older) or single chainrings. Boardman hybrids also plentiful, or the Trek 7.x range (think you’ll need the 3 minimum for a carbon fork) or one of the Pinnacles?
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Steel framed hybrids are available new, but they are at the low end of the spectrum and won't be the finest quality mechanically. If you just want a no-nonsense general purpose bike and are riding in reasonably flat terrain, so don't need super low gears, I would get a B'Twin Riverside 100 or 120 7-speed model from Decathlon, without any hesitation whatsoever. Then I would put a bit more money into equipping it with better tyres like Schwalbe Marathons to minimise punctures. You won't find better value than Decathlon and anything cheaper than a Riverside will probably be a supermarket BSO, not a decent bike.
If you want a better quality steel bike and more gears, then secondhand is really the only option nowadays as steel has been relegated to only the budget end and the very high end custom stuff. The mass market bikes are primarily aluminium in the mid range then carbon at the higher end, neither of which appeal to me in the slightest. For this reason my frontline hybrid is a 1995 Raleigh Pioneer with a Reynolds 501 frame that I paid £10 for secondhand then fitted some new tyres to and generally gave it a once-over. It owes me less than £60 in total and I've been using it for about 3 years. Cycling doesn't get any cheaper than that.
 

All uphill

I didn't recognise you but I knew your bike
Location
Somerset
Hybrid steel bikes from the 90's will give you what you want. A good service and replacement of consumables together with a good saddle and grips will result in a very adaptable and comfortable bike. If you want to spend most of your budget you could include a respray and have a "new" bike.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
If you want a basic steel framed hybrid them the Riverside 120 would be a good option @ £200. No carbon fork but you really don't need it. Maybe spend a bit upgrading it as @SkipdiverJohn suggests.
If you want a bit more sophistication and a carbon fork there's the RC500 but that has an aluminium frame a little above your budget.
If you can find a sound 90's hybrid them that would provide a very good basis for whatever you'd like to equip it with.
 
OP
woodbine

woodbine

Well-Known Member
Location
Bristol, UK
Thanks for your replies. Plenty to think about. Would be happy with used but needs to be up together without too much needed doing. Carbon forks aren't essential if it was a steel frame, but I think I would need them if it was ally framed. Just want something that is reasonably comfortable (now mid 50s), uncomplicated and reliable. Not worried about looks, the bike will get used in all weathers.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
I'd question your assumption that aluminium framed hybrids are not comfortable. I've ridden one and it was a very nice bike indeed. Most of the comfort stuff is dependent on tyres. There's a whole load of crap written in the cycling press about aluminium frames being "harsh" and carbon forks "soaking up road buzz". They write this because they have to write something to fill the gaps between adverts. I doubt you'd be able to tell the difference between frame materials in a blind test (were such a thing possible). Nothing wrong with steel, I'm a rider of steel bikes myself, but I think you're unnecessarily limiting your choice.
 
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