Recovery

funkidunc

New Member
Hi guys

I have been cycling regularly commuting to work and back, 12 miles one way, and slightly longer at the weekend. The terrain around me is fairly hilly but usually take my time up hill but average on the whole 14mph

The thing is on the longer rides (max 20 miles) I feel absolutely shattered for hours afterwards, quite sickly, heavy-headed and lethargic though my muscles seem ok. I feel I am taking on plenty of fluids, a bottle of water and a bottle of squash.

Can anyone give me some advice on how to counteract the tiredness, lethargy etc

Many thanks
 

NormanD

Lunatic Asylum Escapee
Are you eating at all before / during / after the rides? if not then thats why you're feeling that way.

I always eat something a few hours before a ride /cereal with sliced bananas, some snacks on the ride energy bars / banana and a good meal a few hours after a long ride, then I put my feet up for the remainder of the day.

Or maybe you just need some rest days inbetween to help your body recover
 

hotmetal

Senior Member
Location
Near Windsor
Definitely keep the fluid intake up - in this weather you lose more than you'd think.
12 miles each way every day is a fair amount of exercise, so while I'd expect you to acclimatise to that fairly quickly, you might well be overdoing it if your body is not getting any rest days. There are various potions and powders for recovery, although when I go out on a Saturday ride (about 60 miles/19 ave) I usually eat a load of porridge and fruit before, plus at least a pint of water, drink a bottle or 2 en-route, and then another 2 pints when I get back. Chocolate milk is supposed to be as good a recovery drink as any, though SIS do something called REGO. Personally I just use their electrolyte when its hot and stick to the choccy milk for recovery. But I only ride twice a week tops, so I'm getting plenty of time for my muscles to recover.

The tiredness/lethargy could be quite simply that you need a couple of rest days in between, I also find that my performance drops badly if I'm tired and/or dehydrated. Beware overtraining, you can end up lowering your immune system and making yourself susceptible to colds etc.
 
OP
F

funkidunc

New Member
Thanks guys.

When I commute I generally leave 30mins after a bowl of cerreal. Upon leaving work (515pm) I havent eaten since lunch 12.30pm.

Its a bit adhoc regarding eating if I am riding at the weekend.

Will try the porridge etc and the rest days. I think I usually feel the worse if there have been long or steep inclines on my routes.
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Your are running out of energy. Go to a bike shop and buy some sport drink powder based on maltodextrin then mix it into your drink bottle. SIS is good but there are plenty of others.

Try to eat something like a flapjack an hour or so before setting off for home, I feel weak and hungry by 5.30 every day so I know how you must be feeling.
 

Moodyman

Guru
Funnkydunc - I do a 12 mile daily commute (similar terrain to yours) and I find this easily doable every day. Your body gets used to what you throw at it, but when you increase the distance it becomes as a bit of shock for it.

As others siad - take additional fuel with you. Also, consider a mid-way breather - say 5 mins or so.
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
Honestly, for a one hour commute, you shouldn't be worrying about extra nutrition.

At 12 mph, a one hour commute might burn 600 kCals.

Running around like a blue arsed fly for an hour at work wouldn't cause you to go calculating how many calories you deserve for the exercise although you probably burned 600 kCals.

Its daily life.

"Cycling". Its a sport. Therefore, it NEEDS to be looked upon as a deliberate exercise session with proper nutrition and physiological attention.

"Commuting by bike". Its your transport. Your transport which requires muscular effort, just like 'running around like a blue arsed fly'.
 

battered

Guru
I have to agree with jimbo. Get plenty of water down you and consider having a bit of food before you leave in the evening. It doesn't have to be anything clever, just a flapjack, couple of biscuits, a bit of fruit, glass of milk, yogurt, whatever. For a 12 mile commute you don't need any "special" ingredients.
 

Moodyman

Guru
I think the Op is saying that he's fine a 12m commute, it's only when ups his distance (20m) that he struggles.
 
OP
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funkidunc

New Member
Moodyman said:
I think the Op is saying that he's fine a 12m commute, it's only when ups his distance (20m) that he struggles.

Sorry my writing is pants. The 12 mile commute is fine, even the return journey with the last 7 miles up hill. However, when I go on longer rides I do feel the effects more, especially as it takes alot of effort for me to get up the hills.

I hope its just as my body gets used to the inclines plus eating and drinking more sensibly.

thank you all for your advice.
 
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