Ribble, Specialized or Moustach? Worried about motor size

Binka

Über Member
Location
Lincoln, uk
currently cycle commute, 7 miles each way, totally flat. I must admit on wet, windy days I wish I could do it a bit easier and a bit quicker so am thinking of getting an electric bike. I also have a road bike as well as my commuter bike and the plan would be to keep using the road bike for leisure. So don’t think I need a bike capable of going further, etc. I weigh 80kg and have books and sometimes shopping in the panniers.

I think I’ve narrowed it down to a few different bikes. I’m keen to keep the weight of the bike down as much as possible. Someone I know has a bike which weighs 24 kg and says she needs the assist on all the time due to the weight. I’d like on nice days to not have to use the assist? So the bikes I’m looking at are all in the 15kg-18kg range. But generally have a 250wh motor and a smaller battery. Will I regret getting a bike with a small motor? What I’ve read suggests it might be an issue on hills but there’s no hills near me.

The ribble is quite a bit cheaper than the others and I’m not sure why. Any thoughts on which of these 3 is the better buy please? I can get the Specialized or Moustache locally and try before I buy but looks like the Ribble will be a case of ordering and a wait until June for it.

https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-hybrid-al-e-step-through-fully-loaded/

https://www.specialized.com/gb/en/t...894?color=301320-154894&searchText=93920-5502

https://moustachebikes.com/en/electric-bikes/dimanche-28/dimanche-28-1-open/
 

cougie uk

Über Member
How fast do you ride at ? These bikes cut off at 15.5 mph so if it was over that then you wouldn't get the full benefit.
 

Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
If your route is flat then weight is not of huge concern, especially on an ebike - unless of course you need to pick the pick it up.
 

T4tomo

Veteran
The Ribble is cheaper because it is made in Lancashire.

Joking aside, they have a reputation for producing really good bikes at a sensible price point, because they don't pee a load of money up the wall on marketing like specialized etc. (see also Planet X - Yorkshires equivalent), but not for ebikes at the moment)

It will be ideal for what you want, a bit of assist for the days/ times you want it when a headwind is blowing etc. These 250w motor ebikes are the way forward.
 
OP
Binka

Binka

Über Member
Location
Lincoln, uk
Thanks everyone. I just plod along when I'm commuting, average about 11mph, slower if it's windy. so the 15mph cut off doesn't bother me.
Interesting point about how I could have a heavier bike on a flat route and wouldn't notice it. So do I think I don't need a bigger motor because it's flat so get the lighter bike/smaller motor. Or do I think it doesn't matter if the bike is heavy because it's flat so get the bigger motor bike?
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
You wont regret a smaller motor, because 250W is all you can legally have. Modern motors are all pretty dedent for torque, so unless you're very heavy there is little to choose between them on the road. However you measure it, 250W is 250W regarsless of whether its from Germany, Taiwan or Timbuktu. Thats not really a problem, as 250W ppwers me merrily up steep hills, and I don't give much change from 19 stones. 250W is ample, which is just as well as thats all you can have without licence, insurance, and all the rest of it.

Don't get hung up on torque figures either, as there are lies, damn lies, and ebike motor torque claims. Some manufacturers are claiming as much torque as a small car, which is clearly utter bollards. Unlike motor vehicles, there is no internationally agreed or legal standard for descriving a bicycle motors output, so they can claim as much bull as they like and they can't be called out on it.

On a short commute such as yours battery capacity wont be a problem, so no need to get hung up in that either. That's good, gives you some extra wiggle room on cost and weight and widens the choice of candidates.

You won't be going any quicker - except uphill - so your commute times will remain unchanged, but you will expend less effort and headwinds and the like are less of a challenge. Indeed, as a fit and healthy cyclist who merrily blats about on a normal bike I find headwinds and dire weather are when my ebike really comes into its own.

Of the 3 id be more inclined towards the Ribble. All the bikes have fair specs, so you're nitpicking with the differences there, but Ribble have very quickly earned themselves a rep for good value, no nonsense, effective ebikes, so that would be at the apex of my personal list as a starting point. The Ribble is cheaper as its rear driver - the motors are cheaper and easir to producce, as ar the frames. On the tarmac its no disadvantage whatsover, so its money saved without detriment to the bikes abilities or riding experience.

However, you really need to ride one as only then will you know if it suits you and will deliver the characteristics you desire - it's not really possible to determine that from a spec sheet. That may be tricky, particularly at this current time where bikes are selling well and stock isn't lingering for long.

Good luck.
 
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OP
Binka

Binka

Über Member
Location
Lincoln, uk
Thank you - one other point, the majority of the commute is on a tow path. It's quite a decent crushed/compacted stone surface and my hybrid has no issues on it. In fact neither does my road bike. Would the Ribble if it's a rear driver be ok with that?
 

richtea

Active Member
You'll be fine with the Ribble level of assist (I can't vouch for the others - sorry). You'll probably get away with either level 1 assistance (of 3), or none at all. Level 1 is the equivalent of a strong following wind - you just sail along pretty effortlessly on the flat, putting in maybe 50% of the effort if that. I'd say Levels 2 and 3 are for hills, but you don't have any!
Also consider the Orbea Gain - it's the same ebikemotion system, and same sensible pricing. The 2021 models are particularly tidy with in-built lights and hidden wiring.

Light bikes feel nicer to ride if you're not using the motor - easier acceleration, less heavy braking - but once you're rolling it's no different.
 
OP
Binka

Binka

Über Member
Location
Lincoln, uk
Thanks, I really like the look of the Orbea. I’ve emailed them asking for confirmation of the weight as I can’t find it anywhere. I want a flat bar bike so it’s the Vibe I’d want, not the Gain. Looks like it’s tubeless ready as well.
 

gzoom

Well-Known Member
So do I think I don't need a bigger motor because it's flat so get the lighter bike/smaller motor.
Don't be deceived by how powerful electric motors are compared to their size.

This is what 250watts of assistance does to my PB time on a hill near me!!

On max assist my eBike with a 250watts motor needs pretty much zero effort to maintain 15mph on the flat.

50862683841_1b803da12c_c_d.jpg
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
The Ribble is cheaper because it has a rear hub motor which is much simpler - and cheaper - than the crank drives on the other two.

It is also cheaper because battery capacity costs, and the Ribble has half the battery capacity of the other two.

The Ribble is what you might call a 'light assist' ebike, but should be fine for your proposed use, particularly as the other half of the motor - you - already has some cycling fitness.

Against hub drives is they tend to give a slightly less pure cycling experience.

The control systems are more sophisticated (and expensive) on a crank drive, and riding 'through the gears' tends to give a more push bike style experience, just with less effort.

The difference is unlikely to be a concern on a commuter where the main task is just to get the job done, and in any case, modern hub motor control systems are much better and smoother than they were a few years ago.

The Orbea is worth a look, but it uses the same main components as the Ribble, so will weigh the same give or take a few grams.
 

richtea

Active Member
Thanks, I really like the look of the Orbea. I’ve emailed them asking for confirmation of the weight as I can’t find it anywhere. I want a flat bar bike so it’s the Vibe I’d want, not the Gain. Looks like it’s tubeless ready as well.
Gains come in flatbar models too. Ah, but you're right - it looks like they've changed the name to Vibe, and added a rack to several versions.
Gains 'F' models are still around in small numbers, if you want a bargain:
https://winstanleysbikes.co.uk/orbea-gain-f40-2020-electric-bike
https://www.everndencycles.co.uk/120063/products/orbea-gain-f40-m-blkred.aspx
https://www.jejamescycles.com/product/19821/orbea-orbea-gain-f30-electric-bike-2020/option/

Weight is 13-16 Kg, I think - but you need to spend a small fortune to get the 13Kg one. It will be carbon.

My 2019 D50 came 'tubeless-ready', but with tubes. Weird. I quite like simplicity of tubes, and I don't mind fixing the occasional puncture.
 

fatblokish

Guru
Location
In bath
I use a Ribble hybrid Al-e, and really like it. However, I've had two "recall to factory" issues in the last 8 months, a real pain. The Ribble is great at moderate gradients, say up to 10%, but above that you will realise the shortcomings of less torque.

I wish it had a bigger factory battery though ( the range extender is tooooo expensive and toooooooooo small) as I'd love to use it for touring. Very little "drag" above 15mph. That said, if it fits your use case of 14 miles/d and your route is flat, I'm sure it will suit you admirably. Great gears, brakes, well put together and relatively light too. Bars are too wide for me, and I swapped out the saddle for a Brooks. Simple to use, unless it breaks down!
 
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