Road bike 1" threaded fork/headset upgrade options.

sittingbull

Über Member
Location
South Liverpool
A friend of mine has a Giant Peloton road bike with an aluminium frame and aluminium forks. The ride is harsh and he's considering upgrading the forks to carbon fibre. The bike has a 1" threaded headset and a quill stem.

My understanding is that if he can find carbon fibre forks with a 1" steerer and replace the threaded headset with a 1" threadless headset (plus replace the stem), then that's one option.

However whenever I've looked for 1" carbon fibre forks they're pretty rare. So could he replace the current headset with a 1 1/8" threadless headset and use 1 1/8" carbon fibre forks?

I guess an alternative way of asking this question is whether both 1" and 1 1/8" threadless headsets will fit the same head-tube internal diameter?

Any advice appreciated :okay:
 

Hacienda71

Mancunian in self imposed exile in leafy Cheshire
I have a set of 1" carbon forks for sale in the classifieds. I don't think you can use a 1' 1/8 headset in a 1" frame. Someone will know for sure though.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
A friend of mine has a Giant Peloton road bike with an aluminium frame and aluminium forks. The ride is harsh and he's considering upgrading the forks to carbon fibre. The bike has a 1" threaded headset and a quill stem.
Having ridden steel frames, alu frames, alu frames with carbon forks and full carbon frames I'm rather sceptical about the alleged comfort properties of one material over another.

Out of interest, what tyres and tubes is your friend running?
 

midlife

Guru
The thickness of the alloy and the young modulus seem to make them more "buzzy". Mind you this was quite a few year ago and I guess alloy frames are better now :smile:

Shaun
 
OP
sittingbull

sittingbull

Über Member
Location
South Liverpool
Having ridden steel frames, alu frames, alu frames with carbon forks and full carbon frames I'm rather sceptical about the alleged comfort properties of one material over another.

Out of interest, what tyres and tubes is your friend running?
My friend has a number of bikes spanning several decades. The only frame/fork combination he doesn't have is full carbon, He is well placed to judge the properties of one frame over another. This particular aluminium frame looks to have been well specced in it's day. If the shifters are original, they are (from memory) RX100 STI's if that helps date the bike. They might not be original though.

I'm not sure on the tyres but they looked narrow, I'd say 700 x 20c (I realise this will aggravate the harsh ride). He hopes to fit 25s but this will depend on the rims which are Mavic MA2's.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
If he's riding 20mm tyres changing to 23 or 25mm will make a far bigger difference than a change of fork. It also depends on the quality of the tyre, a good tyre with a supple sidewall will vastly improve the ride.
 

midlife

Guru
It depends on how the fibre is laid, some carbon frames you can push in with your finger in low stress areas.

Shaun
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
Carbon fibre is more rigid than either steel or aluminium, so how come it gives such a (Allegedly) comfortable ride?
It can be layered up to be as stiff or as compliant as you like.

I didn't mention it, but you can make steel, carbon or alloy to be compliant/stiff etc etc. Alloy isn't the best though as it's a less flexible material.

OK. Here goes.

We used to have a rough bit of road near work. I rode every day on my fixed, alloy frame, carbon forks, cabon set post. It's rough. Switch to my 653 Ribble and it's like riding on a carpet. Steel doesn't half 'zuzz' out road vibration. I can't comment about full carbon., but it's somewhere in the middle with a big weight loss.
 

Hacienda71

Mancunian in self imposed exile in leafy Cheshire
My old steel 531 Carlton is far smoother than my Alu Ribble with carbon forks and seatpost. I have two full carbon bikes, they are as smooth as steel in terms of absorbing buzz off the road, both are stiffer than steel and one is far stiffer than the other. It is also less foregiving over small potholes etc. It feels though that more effort you put in the more you get in return if that makes any sense.
 
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