Road Bike vs Gravel Bike

Venod

Eh up
I would agree to some extent, but being restricted to 28c tyres does have its limitations, levels of concentration on gnarley rutted tracks being one. If my endurance bike had the clearance i would never have gone gravel.
This is the post to take notice of in this thread, by all means use your old bike off road, but if it hasn't got the clearance for larger tyres your going to be limited where you can take it, larger tyres can be run at lower pressure's for grip and comfort and larger clearance frames deal with mud better.
 
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carlosfandangus

Active Member
This is my bike, both photos taken on the same ride and a mix of surface, first one gravel, which when the track is finished (re surfacing at the moment) will be 6 miles of gravel, the other end is a muddy footpath into town, there is about 1 to 2 miles of road between pictures and they are 6 miles apart approx, this is do able on 28's however so much easier and faster on 38's run tubeless at 45 psi, my advice is to go wide and lower pressure.
 

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Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
There was an amusing* bit on GCN recently about history repeating itself. In the 1980s companies started selling bikes marketed specifically for rough terrain. Then people started complaining that they were uncomfortable, so various shock absorbers and dampers and so on were invented and introduced. Some succeeded, and some failed. The result was the modern mountain bike. In the 2010s companies started selling gravel bikes. Now enterprising kickstarter bods are re-inventing things like shock absorbing stems that were already tried (and weren't necessarily successful) on MTBs. And one company has already cut to the chase and introduced a full sus gravel bike. Now they just need to make the bars a bit wider and flatter for better control ...

*ish
 
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kingrollo

Veteran
I brought the ribble tiagra - it would be £1k - but I got it for less on C2W - unfortunately I knackered my back shortly after purchased it - so it has limited miles - I am using as a winter road bike at the moment - hopefully if my back gets better I will stick on some more durable tyres and commute through the parks.

Its fine for what I want - from by best CF bike - it is pretty weighty - but I guess thats what you get at this price point
 

carlosfandangus

Active Member
I have 38 mm Vittoria trail tech on mine, tubeless at 45 psi, I previously had Michelin power gravel 40 mm, both with full mudguards... it was my commuter primarily, I could go all the way to 50 mm but no guards, this to me is more like mountain bike territory and I would lose the road bias that the 38's give, its not a great deal slower than my synapse.

I did make a mistake or two when building it, I bought a 105 groupset, however the brakes are flat mount, frame was post mount, it now has Deore calipers, I also swapped the chainset after 200 miles and went GRX to give me a lower gear ratio, I hope to recoup some of the extra cost when I have a sort out and sell some unneeded spares
 

Grant Fondo

Riding backwards into the future
Location
Cheshire
I have 38 mm Vittoria trail tech on mine, tubeless at 45 psi, I previously had Michelin power gravel 40 mm, both with full mudguards... it was my commuter primarily, I could go all the way to 50 mm but no guards, this to me is more like mountain bike territory and I would lose the road bias that the 38's give, its not a great deal slower than my synapse.

I did make a mistake or two when building it, I bought a 105 groupset, however the brakes are flat mount, frame was post mount, it now has Deore calipers, I also swapped the chainset after 200 miles and went GRX to give me a lower gear ratio, I hope to recoup some of the extra cost when I have a sort out and sell some unneeded spares
I would agree on being as quick as a Synapse, I had a 2008 carbon ultegra, but current Specialized Diverge Sport better on road imo, so 32c's going on at weekend to become main road/light off road bike.
 

12boy

Über Member
Location
Casper WY USA
History does repeat itself... I rode my 62 or so Schwinn Racer with 27 inch wheels and 1 1/4 inch tires all over the mesas that surround Albuquerque New Mexico on gravel, sand, dirt etc, being to ignorant to know it wouldn' t work. Actually Rivendell bikes have been selling these kind of bikes for decades although they are kinda Ludditey ......all steel frames and forks, usually lugged, low trail, long wheelbase with friction shifters, and fat tires. Except it will only take 35mm tires, that's my 82 Holdsworth Special.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Rivendell bikes have been selling these kind of bikes for decades although they are kinda Ludditey ......all steel frames and forks, usually lugged, low trail, long wheelbase with friction shifters, and fat tires.
So what you actually meant to say, is that Rivendell still make proper bikes.....
 

12boy

Über Member
Location
Casper WY USA
Perhaps as you and I might define them. I prefer level top tubes and curved ones like old balloon tire bikes, as my tastes were formed about sixty years ago. I don't think the sloping down tube thing is as attractive. Functionally, though I totally agree.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
I prefer level top tubes and curved ones like old balloon tire bikes, as my tastes were formed about sixty years ago. I don't think the sloping down tube thing is as attractive.
To me, a sloping top tube just looks wrong on anything but a MTB, and even then the amount of slope should only be a few degrees at the most, just enough to give an extra inch of standover clearance in front of the saddle nose. The majority of modern frames with big tubes, odd shaped tubes, and extreme degrees of slope, I just regard as pig ugly and I won't even consider owning or riding such bikes.
 
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