Self Help Books

kingrollo

Veteran
Well they generally cost less than a tenner - they must be full of shite and of no real to anyone ? -

IME I have found the following very helpful

Pain Free - Peter Egoscue

Treat your own back - Robin Mckenzie

Stop thinking start living - Richard Carlson
 

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
"Who Moved My Cheese" is a good read, but I hope you are never given a copy. It seems that quite a few firms hand them out before they start a "re-organisation".
 

Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
"Who Moved My Cheese" is a good read, but I hope you are never given a copy. It seems that quite a few firms hand them out before they start a "re-organisation".
Absolutely - I was given a pdf of it by my manager about the same time he suggested that I did not start an extension on my house. On the plus note, I am still here and he is not.
 

Sharky

Veteran
Location
Kent
Absolutely - I was given a pdf of it by my manager about the same time he suggested that I did not start an extension on my house. On the plus note, I am still here and he is not.
I've been given two copies! The first copy when I was at a large insurance company (They didn't make a drama out of a crisis) and they closed the complete site following a merger. So I moved onto another firm and after a couple of years, they were giving out copies. Luckily, I survived this round and stayed until I retired.
 

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
I started to read "The road less travelled" but I took a wrong turn.
 

AuroraSaab

Senior Member
I'm a fan of self help books. A lot of them are rubbish but the ones written by doctors and therapists are often very good. I am interested in psychology so I will read them for enjoyment and education as much as for self improvement.

I found these very useful when I suffered from anxiety after having some major health issues:

Self Help for Your Nerves by Dr Claire Weekes
Stop Thinking Start Living - excellent CBT book on negative thinking by Richard Carlson (all his books are good)
The Worry Cure by David Leahy and
Feel Good New Mood Therapy by David Burns, both good CBT books.

7 Habits of Highly Effective People is pretty good. Anything by Gretchen Rubin is good; her books on the 4 Tendencies (personality types) and habits are both a good read.

I'm currently reading Atomic Habits by James Clear which has some good strategies for habit building.

Daring Greatly by Brene Brown is very good. It's about being prepared to show vulnerability.

Two books that many people rate, but which I thought were pants, were The Power of Now by Eckhard Tolle - just a knock off of Buddhist ideas, nothing original, very lightweight - and Reasons Not to Die by Matt Haigh - really piss poor and lightweight, just a very simple account of his struggles but with not much practical help. Mad Girl by Bryony Gordon is a much better (and funny) account of dealing with mental health issues.

If you look on Abebooks or Amazon you can get them used fairly cheaply. Also, The Works usually have some stuff for a couple of quid.

I also quite like the Zen Habits web site, and the Tiny Buddha web site (it's just articles; not about Buddhism). I like learning stuff so I'm always interested in new ideas and insights.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom