Shortcrust pastry made with vegetable fats query

Discussion in 'CycleChat Cafe' started by vernon, 17 Jul 2012.

  1. vernon

    vernon Harder than Ronnie Pickering

    Location:
    Meanwood, Leeds
    Has anyone done it?

    While buying Dellzeq's recommended culinary delight in an asioan supermarket I came across some tins of halal corned beef which means that I can make a halal corned beef an onion pie for one of my muslim colleagues.

    The tinng is I've only used lard based pastry in the past and that's a non starter for the proposed pie.

    Does vegetable fats e.g. Trex work?

    I don't want to waste pie making time unnecessarily.
     
  2. Berties

    Berties Fast and careful!

    with the so called health connections of eating animal fats, trex is used more and more,with the right recipe you won't tell the difference,but i have also had to change flours for celiac flour,and the pastry gets a bit tough,but trex gives a nice result,
    i am trying to source vegan wine at present,for a non animal product using believer,as a lot of wine is cleared with egg whites ,getting a nice red and white is being hard to get ,but we are nearly there now,very admirable of you to go to such a effort for your friend and i am sure they will appreciate your effort:hungry:
     
  3. Melonfish

    Melonfish Evil Genius in training.

    Location:
    Warrington, UK
    50/50 fat and butter should be fine regardless of if you use lard or trex
    i use trex all the time for pastry it comes out grand.
     
  4. ASC1951

    ASC1951 Guru

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Trex certainly reckon you can, although they don't go as far as a corned beef pie>
    http://www.trex.co.uk/recipes/savoury-pies-and-tarts/

    As for vegan wine, Berties, most of the supermarkets do vegan wine, although if a 'nice red and white' means going over £15 a bottle you'll be in a wine merchant not a supermarket. Within the everyday price range, I personally rate Morrisons - whose Head Buyer is a Master of Wine - and all their vegan bottles are marked on their website. So are Majestic Wines' http://www.majestic.co.uk/find/Vegan-is-Vegan
     
  5. theclaud

    theclaud It's teeceegawnmaaaad

    Location:
    Swansea
    What exactly is Trex made of? They claim it no longer contains hydrogenated oils, but there is absolutely no information on their website about what it is or how they make it solid at room temperature.
     
  6. Pat "5mph"

    Pat "5mph" A kilogrammicaly challenged woman Moderator

    Location:
    Glasgow
    Can you not use Ghee to make your pie? You can buy Ghee in all Asian grocery shops (here at least, not sure in your neck of the woods)
     
  7. buddha

    buddha Veteran

    I've used olive oil spread with good results. Just put the tub in the freezer overnight and then cut into cubes.
    As ever, I think the key is not to over work the dough.
     
    Uncle Mort likes this.
  8. OP
    OP
    vernon

    vernon Harder than Ronnie Pickering

    Location:
    Meanwood, Leeds
    I'm not too concerned about hydrogenated fats as long as the stuff is pork product free.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    vernon

    vernon Harder than Ronnie Pickering

    Location:
    Meanwood, Leeds
    There has too strong a flavour to use. I have access to some of the best Asian supermarkets on the country and can get hold of stuff that I didn't even know existed like a faecal bulk tonic. I suppose it could be cement powder to thicken the consequences of the runs but I digress.
     
  10. theclaud

    theclaud It's teeceegawnmaaaad

    Location:
    Swansea
    I'm sure it'll work fine. A flatmate of mine used to make good shortcrust pastry with half butter and half Trex. I just find it rather sinister. I've just dropped them an email.
     
  11. ASC1951

    ASC1951 Guru

    Location:
    Yorkshire
    You'll be meaning East End's packets of isagboal seeds? aka Psyllium, to you and me. I have them in my home-assembled muesli, along with lin seeds, poppy seeds etc, not because there is anything wrong with my internals but because I like the taste - and they are actually rather good for you in moderation.
     
  12. buddha

    buddha Veteran

    Actually ... I use (the tasteless) olive oil for making normal shortcrust sometimes - for tarts;) etc.. Straight from the bottle. And it's been fine. Sometimes adding a pinch of baking powder to make it a little 'lighter'.
    This thread is making me hungry:hungry:
     
    Pat "5mph" likes this.
  13. Arch

    Arch Married to Night Train

    Location:
    Salford, UK
    I have a bottle of coconut oil which is solid at room temperature, except on very hot days. It would certainly be solid kept in a fridge.

    And some olive oils solidify slightly in the bottle on the shelf, so they are on the edge of being solid.
     
  14. Fab Foodie

    Fab Foodie hanging-on in quiet desperation ...


    It's the solid fat crystals you need to stabilise the pastry structure, they're also important in bread and cake manufacture too.
    As Arch states, you can of course use naturally hard oils such as coconut or Palm, but they are expensive. (The sensible thing to do would be to take cheap and plentiful oils and fully hydrogenate them (no trans fats) to get hard fats and then blend them with softer oils, but since the media mis-informed the population that won't happen).

    The other way that I am aware of is a process called 'Interesterification:

    Fats/oils consist of a molecule of Glycerol to which 3 fatty acids can be attached by a reaction called esterification. Fatty acids come in different lengths from 4 Carbon atoms long (giving butter it's distinctive whiff) to 22 carbon atoms long and may be either saturated (giving hardness) or unsaturated (giving fluidity). During interesterification, you 'simply swap the fatty acid chains around to create distinct species where for example each Glycerol molecule has 3 saturated long chain fatty acids attached rendering them harder and others have shorter chain or unsaturated fatty acids rendering them fluid at room temp. Seperation of the 2 fractions is a case of cooling them to a certain temp and spinning-off the hard crystaline molecules.
    Or something like that!
    ,Here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interesterified_fat
     
  15. Hacienda71

    Hacienda71 Mancunian in self imposed exile in leafy Cheshire

    Location:
    Wilmslow, Cheshire
    So are hydrogenated fats not so bad and it is just trans-fats we need to worry about?
     
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