Simpler Driver Testing for HGVs and Trailers

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
What do you think about it?
 

PeteXXX

Cake or ice cream? The choice is endless ...
Location
Hamtun
  • allow drivers to take one test to drive both a rigid and articulated lorry, rather than having to pass a test in a rigid lorry first, and then another in an articulated lorry
  • allow the off-road manoeuvres part of the test to be assessed by the driver training industry
On the 1st point. This used to be the case. I went straight to HGV 1 (C+E)
I don't remember when it became necessary to pass a Rigid test.

2nd point. Off road manoeuvres were done before leaving the test centre. If you failed reversing, forward control and safe heavy braking, you didn't actually get onto the road.
Would this new idea be so they can close HGV test centres as the test pad is quite large.
 

rogerzilla

Legendary Member
Presumably this doesn't mean us oldies with C1 on our car licence can now drive an artic!

I drove a 7.5 tonner once for a long house move, including some narrow residential roads, and didn't much enjoy it. However, the driver who brought my firewood last week says new trucks of that size are easy, because they have sensors and cameras so even a numpty can reverse them.
 

Brandane

Rain magnet.
Location
Costa Clyde.
I look forward to receiving a refund of approximately £1000, which is what it cost me to do the training and test for the soon to be redundant (if it comes to be) class 2 licence. As it was always just going to be a stepping stone to class 1.

OK, mine is historical by about 16 years, so not a big deal. But if I had gone through class 2 recently to find it was a wasted £1000 I would not be happy.

Also, what about those who have no need to drive an articulated vehicle? I'm thinking here about horse owners who want to drive a horse box, so bigger than 7.5 tonnes but not articulated. Other examples exist. They were the excuse for bringing in the extra test for class 2 in the first place! Presumably now young Sophie who wants to drive her horse box is going to have to learn to drive an artic?
 

Brandane

Rain magnet.
Location
Costa Clyde.
However, the driver who brought my firewood last week says new trucks of that size are easy, because they have sensors and cameras so even a numpty can reverse them
A 7.5 tonne "lorry" is really just a big car. Think Range Rover, or a Transit van, but slightly bigger. So yes, even a numpty who passed their car test prior to 1990 (??) can, and does, drive them. Which is no worse than the amount of numpties driving over-sized BMW, Range Rover, and other 4x4's. There should really be a more stringent test and an additional licence category for them.
 
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PeteXXX

Cake or ice cream? The choice is endless ...
Location
Hamtun
@Brandane I guess there will be a Class 2 or 3 licence if you want just that for Rigid work, but that you can go straight for bendy toys if you want.
Yes, annoying to has wasted a grand pointlessly. Not sure how much it costs now!
My Class 1 cost me about £700 I think, in 1980, though some folk get subsidised by a company. I didn't want to be beholden to anyone (3 year contract to stay at the company that put you through)
 

PeteXXX

Cake or ice cream? The choice is endless ...
Location
Hamtun
Presumably this doesn't mean us oldies with C1 on our car licence can now drive an artic!

I drove a 7.5 tonner once for a long house move, including some narrow residential roads, and didn't much enjoy it. However, the driver who brought my firewood last week says new trucks of that size are easy, because they have sensors and cameras so even a numpty can reverse them.
Correct. It doesn't. It just means that you can go straight for Class 1 C+E
In theory, you don't even have to have a car licence to take an HGV test as that would cover your car licence, too.. Scary, eh!
 

DRM

Guru
Location
West Yorks
Correct. It doesn't. It just means that you can go straight for Class 1 C+E
In theory, you don't even have to have a car licence to take an HGV test as that would cover your car licence, too.. Scary, eh!
No more scarier than when the Eastern Europeans were first coming over here in Artics they couldn't drive/reverse because they automatically got a licence to do so as they had driven an agricultural tractor & trailer on a farm
 
No more scarier than when the Eastern Europeans were first coming over here in Artics they couldn't drive/reverse because they automatically got a licence to do so as they had driven an agricultural tractor & trailer on a farm
The UK gov could have simply refused to recognise them if they were that poorly trained: I'm pretty sure Germany did with some new EU countries at first and may still do so now in some cases.
 

DRM

Guru
Location
West Yorks
The UK gov could have simply refused to recognise them if they were that poorly trained: I'm pretty sure Germany did with some new EU countries at first and may still do so now in some cases.
UK Gov were sure they were all paying tax on the fuel they bought here, had the then transport minister on a radio talk show when UK hauliers were complaining VED & fuel cost compared to the Eastern Europeans was driving them to the wall, he was soon disabused of this view by several UK owner drivers that called in to explain why these foreign trucks had huge fuel tanks down each side of the tractor unit, and that they were sacked if they filled up in the UK, filling up at cheaper outlets in Europe, I saw several of these drivers (in the loosest sense of the term) have UK drivers reverse their trucks for them because they couldn't get onto the loading bay, I could have done a better job, and the biggest trailer I've reversed was our caravan, they were down right dangerous.
 

lazybloke

Lying in the grass looking at the clouds
Location
Leafy Surrey
A 7.5 tonne "lorry" is really just a big car. Think Range Rover, or a Transit van, but slightly bigger. So yes, even a numpty who passed their car test prior to 1990 (??) can, and does, drive them. Which is no worse than the amount of numpties driving over-sized BMW, Range Rover, and other 4x4's. There should really be a more stringent test and an additional licence category for them.
Some of this thread gave me cause to worry. I've just checked trailer weights - all okay thankfully.

And... oh, my 1988 licence gives me some advantages over more recent licences. This might explain my the scouts wanted me to drive their minibus.

Very confusing. Am I right that the 125cc motorbike provision on my car drivers licence is no longer valid , unless I pass a CBT? And if so, why are larger vehicles still okay?
 

Brandane

Rain magnet.
Location
Costa Clyde.
Am I right that the 125cc motorbike provision on my car drivers licence is no longer valid , unless I pass a CBT? And if so, why are larger vehicles still okay?
Been out the loop on this for a long time, but.... I "think" if you have a licence from 1988 then it still counts as a provisional for a 125cc bike. But even with a provisional, you would still need to pass your CBT before going on public roads.
 

lazybloke

Lying in the grass looking at the clouds
Location
Leafy Surrey
Been out the loop on this for a long time, but.... I "think" if you have a licence from 1988 then it still counts as a provisional for a 125cc bike. But even with a provisional, you would still need to pass your CBT before going on public roads.
Yes I think that's right, although for car passes before 2001 you can apparently still ride a moped (up to 50cc) without any need for training , CBT or even L-plates! Seems weirdly inconsistent.
 
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