SPD Pedals

Venod

Eh up
Location
Yorkshire
Copied from CTC forum so may not be up to date but too good to miss.

SPD pedal compendium


SPD pedal compendium; styles, bearings, tools for overhaul, links.

I was sceptical when the SPD system was first introduced over twenty years ago; I didn't care for the look of the cleats, the bearings, and some of the early shoes broke, too. However, the bearings turned out not to be so bad, and the cleats -despite my worries about wear and funny noises- worked better and lasted longer than I thought they would. Shimano SPD shoes turned out to be OK mostly as well.

SPDs became relatively inexpensive, too; thus eventually my resistance crumbled, to the point that most of my bikes
(yes even road bikes) now have SPD pedals fitted to them. The PD-M515 model turned me; it had all the performance of the PD-M747 model, with the cartridge spindle assembly, all for about £20. Today the PD-M520 model does the same thing, more or less.

It is worth noting that they didn't quite 'get it right first time'; whilst 1990's PD-M737 pedal, the first SPD, did have the cartridge bearing assembly that later found its way into so many other pedals, but it also had a hinged front claw as well as the familiar hinged rear claw. This made for a relatively heavy and bulky pedal. The hinged front claw did not appear again in shimano pedals; it did later feature in some Wellgo 'FPD' models, and some Ritchey WCS pedals have it too, but shimano thought it unnecessary.

The SPD system is not perfect; if you are an out-and-out road racer you may well find something that suits you better, and at the other extreme I wouldn't necessarily want to walk all day in SPD shoes. But for nearly everyone else the SPD system is quite likely to offer a pedal and shoe that does the business at a reasonable cost. Including all the older models (but not, say, colour variations) there are at least 37 different pedal models to choose from, of which there are 16 or more currently available new.

The SPD system continues to evolve; the latest versions have a wider support area to the sides, for example. In recent years the mud clearance has been improved, most models have become slightly lighter, and bearing access is typically easier.

There are very many SPD clones; some are OK, but many are not, lacking even basic stuff like proper ball-bearings. All
genuine shimano SPDs have strong Cr-Mo spindles with good quality adjustable ball bearings, and most have effective seals. However there are three basic tool types required to service the bearings. Most newer models just need a 17mm spanner to extract the cartridge assembly. Many others use a cheap plastic 'pastrycutter' tool TL-PD40 to remove the spindle cartridge. However some models use a pair of thin-walled sockets to adjust the bearings in situ.

Tools TL-PD33, TL-PD63 and TL-PD73 are available; I don't know what the difference is with these tools, they look very similar to me. All these tools share the feature that they cost as much or more than the pedals do.... I made my own tools for this job. [edit; a forum user has helpfully passed on (TVM!) the following measurements;
TL-PD33:Big end;13mm/10mm concentric sockets, 17mm outer body
Small end;10mm/7mm concentric sockets, 17mm outer body,17mm spanner to hold outer
TL-PD73;Big end;11mm/8mm concentric sockets,15mm outer body
Small end;10mm/7mm concentric sockets,13.5mm outer body,15mm spanner to hold outer]

Although usually a different length, the 17mm hexagon sleeve has the same screw thread on as the earlier plastic
'pastrycutter' TL-PD40 sleeve, and the bearing unit is the same size, so in principle with a little machining work
later spindles could be fitted to earlier pedals and vice-versa. More usefully perhaps, there is a very good chance
that any pedal spindle assy that accepts the TL-PD40 tool will interchange partially or wholly with any other (left and right sides excepting of course).

What do you get when you buy expensive SPD versions? Well, not that much TBH. They are sometimes slightly lighter and usually have smoother bearings from the start. XTR bearings are silky-spooky-smooth when correctly adjusted, none better in fact. But even the cheaper ones have bearings that are smooth enough and get smoother with use if serviced from time to time. So if you (say) buy PD-M540 over PD-M970, you save about £30 and gain about 30g weight. Get PD-M520 instead and save another £30 or so at cost of another 30g. There are plenty of other places you can save weight cheaper than £1 per gramme, and even expensive pedals can break in a crash, so why spend more?

Various cleats are available; use the ones that are recommended for your pedals and it'll be fine. Most pedals allow a choice of several cleats with different float/release options. See the techdocs (or for older pedals, the Pardo link) for details. Cleats eventually wear out; if the rear claw wears a groove at the back of the cleat, they can release badly when used in damaged or non-genuine SPD pedals. Light wear (~0.5mm) of this sort can be dressed with a dremel tool but if the cleat is loose fore and aft in the pedal it is probably time for new ones. [Float can vary significantly with pedal design, even when using the same cleat. Used cleats often offer more, freer float than new cleats.]

When setting cleats on the shoes it is important to get it 'right first time' ; the cleats can be difficult to move a small amount after the bolts have been tightened just once, because the cleat teeth dig into most soles and make holes that the cleat will 'find' subsequently. There is an 'Ergon' tool which is meant to help you install the cleats right; I've not used it myself.
[edit; more notes on cleat setting added in a separate section below]. It is a good idea to use copper-ease on the cleat screws, else they won't come undone again after a couple of years use.

If you wreck the threaded mountings by drilling out old cleat screws, don't despair; the mounting plate can usually be accessed by removing the shoe insole. The threaded plate often has two sets of holes in it, in which case it can simply be reversed. Also, new Shimano cleats come with mounting plates that fit Shimano (and some other) shoes.

There are a few full-on 'Road' shoes which are designed to accept SPD cleats; however, if you wish to use a three-bolt-only 'road' shoe with spd cleats, there is an adaptor SM-SH85 for this purpose; Wellgo also make one. If fitting SPD cleats to any flat-soled shoe, it may be worth using 'pontoon' style cleats or the SM-SH40 'stabilising adapter' which has built-in pontoons and (AFAICT) also allows fitment to a three-bolt shoe.

If you wish to use a double-sided XC SPD pedal with flat shoes there are two off-the-shelf routes; a plastic flat converter/reflector unit e.g. SM-PD22, or a metal converter. The plastic converters are a bit flimsy, but OK for occasional use I guess. With any such converter, it pays to clip it in with the tension set to minimum, then wind the tension up to retain the converter. You will need wind the tension down again before removing the converter later on. I know of two metal converters; the 'Winwood Deckster' and the 'Xtreme pro adapter' -which is beartrap styled. Neither has reflectors AFAICT. With both you need to supply your own cleats to fit them, and (obviously) if the cleats have 'float' then so will the adapters. With the metal adapters especially, you run the risk of ending up with the World's heaviest/most complicated/expensive flat pedals, that don't even work that well.

Notably Shimano don't make a 'flat both sides with pop-up SPD one side' pedal which might be a really handy pedal for commuting and touring. Fortunately I think you can now make your own; I think that -with a little work- any (O) DS/DSflat designated pedal can have one set of SPD gubbins unscrewed so that it is properly flat on one side. Such a conversion would be reversible. PD-T400 may be a good candidate for this surgery. (Older DS/DSflat pedals cannot be so easily converted because there are usually still metal parts that poke up even when the SPD fittings are removed, but maybe a hacksaw could remedy that.)

Below is a list of SPD pedal models; I have tried to include all the models that use the small SPD cleat. There are
many others which use SPD-R and SPD-SL cleats and have similar bearings etc but I have not listed these. In the list, * means you need an expensive special tool to adjust the bearings, and (O) means 'open' design which is now the standard for new designs (in contrast to the older ones with a centre platform for the cleat, which has poorer mud clearance but probably wears slightly better). Where the style is not otherwise noted, the pedal is an XC double-sided design.

None of these is a 'bad' pedal per se but some are easier to live with than others. Only the PD-M323, M324, T780, and A530 models are completely suitable for use in ordinary shoes and allow you to pedal without having bits of SPD mechanism poking into your feet; all the other 'flat' models gouge your feet/soles and the remainder require the use of an adaptor. Only the PD-M323, PD-M324, PD-T400, PD-T700, PD-T780 models have a reasonable provision for reflectors; the others mostly have add-ons (SM-PDxx part numbers) which look more like afterthoughts that won't survive real-world use. However the bearings on PD-M323 and 324 models do require special tools so it isn't all rosy here...

Current UK models (as of 7/2012) include the venerable PD-M324, PD-M424, PD-M545 and most 'open' (O) designated pedals in the list below.

For those who care about such things the PD-A600 model has very smooth bearings and is one of the lightest Shimano SPD pedals made, well under 300g; the PD-A520 does the same job, is about half the price and in the real world less than 30g heavier.

Please let me know of any omissions or errors and I will correct accordingly.

Pedal.......note.......style.....................tool.................comment

PD-M323.... *......... SPD(SS)/flat...........TL-PD33............(earlier version of PD-M324)
PD-M324.....*......... SPD(SS)/flat...........TL-PD33............(SPD neophyte/tourists/commuter's favourite)
PD-T400..(O)..........SPD(DS)/DS flat road.TL-PD40............(M520 with resin cage + reflectors)
PD-M424...............SPD(DS)/DS flat.......TL-PD40............(as M545 but with plastic cage)
PD-M434...............SPD(DS)/DS flat.......TL-PD40............(PD-M515 with resin cage)
PD-M454...............SPD(DS)/DS flat.......TL-PD40............(PD-M515 with aluminium cage)
PD-M505........*......SPD.....................TL-PD33............(PD-M747 style but with awkward bearings)
PD-M515...............SPD.....................TL-PD40............(PD-M747 performance for the masses; SPD ubiquity)
PD-A515................SPD(SS,road).........TL-PD40..........(nice shape vs Dura-Ace PD-7410, bargain price/naff colour)
PD-M520...(O).........SPD.....................TL-PD40............(the new standard for XC; move aside PD-M515)
PD-A520...(O).........SPD(SS)/flat road.....TL-PD40...........(SPD and flat are on same side; like PD-A600)
PD-A525................SPD (SS,road).........TL-PD40............(PD-6500's ugly but hard-working cousin)
PD-M525................SPD.....................TL-PD40............(wrap round style body SPD)
PD-A530...(O).........SPD(SS)/flat road.....TL-PD40............(proper platform flat is on reverse side to SPD)
PD-M530...(O).........SPD(DS)/DS flat.......TL-PD40..........(wide support, similar to PD-M785/985)
PD-M535........*.......SPD....................TL-PD33...........(looks similar to PD-M525/737 but lacks cartridge bearings)
PD-M536................SPD(DS)/DS flat......TL-PD40............(compact flat surround)
PD-M540...(O).........SPD.....................17mm Hex..........(see M770)
PD-M545................SPD(DS)/DS flat.......17mm Hex..........(update of M454 pedal)
PD-A600...(O).........SPD(SS)/flat road.....17mm Hex ..........(SPD and flat are on same side; like PD-A520 but posher)
PD-M636.......*........SPD(DS)/DS flat.......TL-PD63...........('DX' pedal with PD-M505 style centre and alloy bolt-up cage)
PD-M646................SPD(DS)/DSflat........TL-PD40.............(PD-M747 + DX style alloy bolt-up cage)
PD-M647...(O).........SPD(DS)/DSflat........17mm Hex..........(PD-M540 + resin cage)
PD-T700...(O).........SPD(DS)/DS flat........17mm Hex...........(M540 with resin cage and reflectors)
PD-M737................SPD.....................TL-PD40..............(XC pedal with 'wrap-round' semi-platform body)
PD-M747................SPD.....................TL-PD40..............(benchmark MTB SPD pedal)
PD-M770...(O).........SPD.....................17mm Hex............(massive interchangeability with M970, M959, M540)
PD-M780...(O).........SPD.....................17mm Hex............(wide cleat support)
PD-T780...(O).........SPD(SS)/flat...........17mm Hex............(wide cleat support pedal, proper flat)
PD-M785...(O).........SPD(DS)/DS flat.......17mm Hex............(wide cleat support)
PD-M858...(O).........SPD.....................TL-PD40...............(early 'open' design)
PD-M959...(O).........SPD.....................17mm Hex............(XTR quality; see PD-M770 etc)
PD-M970...(O).........SPD.....................17mm Hex............(lighter version of M959)
PD-M980...(O).........SPD.....................17mm Hex............(wide cleat support)
PD-M985...(O).........SPD DS/DS flat........17mm Hex............(wide cleat support)

PD-6500................SPD SS road............TL-PD40...............(Ultegra style SPD; model number not marked; Low Q)
PD-7410................SPD SS road............TL-PD40...............(SPD meets Dura-Ace; model number not marked; Low Q)

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Notes on Float.

Float varies with both the cleat and the pedal. The details of the claw design vary with pedal; the full details are not known at this time, but PD-M747 (for example), has a narrower rear jaw opening than (say) PD-M515, and the float action is different as a consequence. Some models have been noted by others to have considerably reduced float, e.g. PD-A525; both jaws do seem to have a narrow opening with this pedal.

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Notes on 'Q'.

Most SPD pedals have an offset of 54mm from the crank to the pedal (cleat) centreline. Most people find this is OK with a wide variety of different shoes. However I have recently noted that PD-6500 and PR-7410 models have a lower offset value of 51.5mm. This doesn't sound like much but it gives a 'Q' value that is 5mm less than with other SPD pedals. It is also enough to likely see your shoes touch or rub on the crank arms. I don't have very wide feet, and I find that my shoes are just kissing the cranks when I use my Dura-Ace PD-7410 SPD pedals. I will probably put up with it though; I prefer the reduced Q value.

PD-A515 appears to have a slightly variable offset, between 54mm and 53mm.

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Some notes on cleat setting.

There are several ways of setting cleats. One simple method (if you are a 'system migrant') is to copy the cleat setting from your old shoes, if they were right, that is. Another method (which is OK for experienced cyclists) is to ride with no cleats for a short distance. The pedal claws should mark the shoe.

However the best way I know of generally (that requires no special equipment) also gives a biomechanically sound fit, starting from scratch. You need a couple of pencils, a ruler, some correction fluid (or similar), something thin and strong (e.g. a piece of metal) that you can stand on (if your shoe does not have blanks where the cleats are fitted) , and some paper.

Set the paper down an a hard floor, and stand on it, feet about the same width apart as they are on the bike. Stand on your toes a few times, allowing your feet to rotate to a comfortable pedalling angle. Mark the outlines of your feet on the paper. Now put one pencil down as a 'dummy pedal spindle', and experiment with its position under the ball of the foot, by raising and lowering your heel. Mark the position on sides of the shoe with the correction fluid. Do the same thing for both feet. Now mark on the paper a long line that goes through both outlines where the pedal spindle should go.

Next, put the pencil down lengthwise, i.e. exactly at right angles to the spindle line, (if your shoe has a hole, not a blank where the cleats fit, with the piece of metal over the top) and stand on it. Experiment with the position so that your foot doesn't tilt easily. Again mark on the shoe, having checked that the foot position still tallies with the spindle marks. Repeat for the other foot.

Now measure the distance from the lengthwise line to the inner edge of the shoe. If this is less than 54mm (and your heel isn't turned inwards too far) then you can have a 'no-compromise' cleat placement on most pedals. However if it is more than this, you will need to use pedal extenders, a whole different pedal system, or the cleat will need to be set slightly inboard of the ideal position. A little inboard set is OK; a lot can be a bad thing, especially with some shoe and pedal combinations.

Note; if you have very wide feet, and/or pedal 'toe out' very much, you should expect a compromise of some kind. In extreme cases I have known people who cannot be accomodated by any conventional clipless system; very wide flat pedals with clips and straps seem to be the only sensible option in these cases.

A final check is to sit on the bike with the shoes (without cleats) in the right place, check for crank clearance, and alignment. Before setting the cleats, experiment by pedalling with slight variations on your 'correct' position; this may help you decide exactly where to set the cleat; you may need more float one way vs another, for example.

If still in doubt, set the cleats loose on the shoe, step in to the pedal, and assume a comfortable position. Then have an assistant mark around the cleat (not easy). This method can work very well, if the marking is done properly; for this, you foot needs to be in the right place, and your assistant generally needs to be rather dexterous. Generally the cleats need to be fully tight in order not to move during release; if I were setting people up on a more regular basis, I'd modify a set of cleats and or pedals so that the cleats locate in, but don't engage with the pedal. This would more easily allow the correct setting to be made.

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Notes on bearing adjustment, for TL-PD40/17mm hex pedals:

Tools required; 7mm ring spanner, 17mm open ended spanner (or TL-PD40 plus holder, e.g. BB fixed cup spanner), thin 10mm full hexagon spanner, minature mole wrench (optional), pedal vice (optional). See also the park tools link below.

Remove the bearing cartridge using the 17mm spanner (or TL-PD40). Note that the retaining sleeves are threaded LH and RH on opposite pedals. I recommend a full hexagon spanner for the cone because it has somewhat rounded corners and is not held well by an open-ended spanner.

file.php?id=17295&t=1&sid=4b3dd1f15cb2bd7f926908d54c386d1b.jpg


The idea is to adjust the bearing progressively tighter until the free play just disappears for the first time when the locknut is tightened. The minature mole wrench is clamped lightly onto the bearing sleeve and allows any free play to be detected easily. Each time the free play is assessed, the locknut should be tightened, else a false reading will result. Note that the locknuts on both pedals are RH threaded. Most pedals come from the factory with a little soft threadlocking compound on the locknut threads.

This procedure is best carried out with the pedal spindle clamped in a pedal vice. You can improvise a pedal vice using a simple loop of wire (as per the picture) or temporarily reinstall the spindle into the crank arm if you don't have a vice available. Once the correct setting is obtained, it isn't a bad idea to check that the bearing isn't too tight, by removing the mole wrench and turning the bearing sleeve by hand. Worn bearings may be best set to be slightly loose for some of each rotation, else they may bind excessively wherever they are tighter; experiment to find the best compromise.

Note that the locknut/cone thread pitch is very fine; a ~3 degree angular adjustment adjusts the bearing clearance by just 5 microns, i.e. 1/5000". This is the kind of accuracy that you are aiming for; even with a well fitting 10mm spanner, you need to allow for any slack in the fit of the spanner on the cone (resulting in backlash) when making adjustments.

Shimano have not published a torque specification for the locknut but I believe 5-7 Nm should do it. If the locknuts are not tight enough, typically the bearing adjustment on one pedal loosens, and it similarly tightens on the other pedal. The latter pedal can suffer greatly accelerated bearing wear.

Each bearing has 12off 3/32" balls in it, making a total of 48 for two pedals. The Shimano part number is Y-41N 98030 for a packet of 62 balls. It is generally a bad idea to mix balls up, even from the same pedal, let alone from different packets or pedals.

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Some notes on PD-7410; as you would expect these pedals are lightweight (~320g) and have super smooth bearings. However there are a few wrinkles;
- TL-PD40 fits but is very tight; any damage to the pedal means it could be a real struggle to fit the tool.
- The bearing retainers are not marked, but are LH/RH threaded the same as other SPD pedals
- The spindles are a good deal shorter than those fitted to other SPD pedals, and I believe are unique to PD-7410
- The spindles do not have an allen key recess; they may only be fitted/removed unsing a thin pedal spanner
- There is a plastic 'flip tab' piece fitted to the rear 'claw'. This is eminently breakable, and cannot be replaced AFAIK. Fortunately it seems not to be essential.
- One of the spring engagement holes in the pedal body typically penetrates into the bearing housing. This can let a small amount of grease out during servicing; it is not known if there is a danger of water ingress through the same hole in use.
-PD-7410 (and PD-6500) give a lower Q value.
-PD-7410 and PD-6500 can use specific cleats with integrated pontoons (for non-recessed road shoes) and subtly different mounting bolts. I believe the mounting bolts protrude slightly; ramps in the pedal base help to centre the cleat and inhibit release whenever there is more pressure on the pedal, presumably to help prevent release during sprinting. Shimano do not recommend these cleats for use with other SPD pedals and those who have tried report that the bolt heads sometimes inhibit release with standard (original) SPD pedals, i.e. with the central rib to the cleat platform. Presumably this is different with the later (current) 'open' pedal designs.

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Other info;

Images; google image search brings up images of all these pedals (although not every image on the internet is correctly labelled)

Madison's Shimano Pedal page;

http://www.madison.co.uk/searchresults.aspx?vertical=cycling&manu=Shimano Pedals

The Park tool website has an SPD overhaul page (although I couldn't access it earlier on today) [edit; which shows PD-7410 getting the treatment

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/spd-pedal-overhaul ]

Weight weenies has an incomplete list of pedals and weights (shimano's weights are pretty accurate BTW).

Velobase has an incomplete list of pedals and dates.

PD-M737 SPuD service (using TL-PD40) from MBUK here;

http://www.drystonepaul.com/maintenance_guides/MBUK_SPD_May_1994.pdf

PD-M545/PD-M424 servicing;

http://www.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/tech_support/tech_tips.download.-Par50rparsys-0015-downloadFile.html/09)%20PD-M545%20and%20424%20Overhaul.pdf

current/recent offroad techdocs here;

http://techdocs.shimano.com/techdocs/blevel.jsp;jsessionid=JfnLMc8T45p3y0fcWdBcT13SqHDqdgpsJk4pC22RbywHnV1K5nGF!-1035298348?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302051175&bmUID=iBcN8Bc&bmLocale=zh

current/recent road techdocs here;

http://techdocs.shimano.com/techdocs/blevel.jsp?FOLDER<>folder_id=2534374302051171&bmUID=jygXiwk

road cleat techdoc (SPD, SPD-R, SPD-SL cleat applications and SM-SH40 listed)

http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/t...LEAT_SET-Road-1136S_v1_m56577569830683886.pdf

SM-SH40 techdoc here;

http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/t...H40/SI-SH40A-001-EN_v1_m56577569830683876.pdf

SM-SH85 adapter techdoc here;[edit this link appears to be broken, and I can't find the SM-SH85 techdoc in the new Lange shimano archive]

http://www.paul-lange.de/fileadmin/paullange/downloads/MAKRO/2006/VPDFS/SI_EN/SH85A_EN.PDF

Lots of Shimano cleats and adapters listed here;

http://www.stilen.com/bike_stuff/SPD-SPD-R_SPD_SL_cleats.pdf

adapter for SH-R151, SH-R215 shoes etc, SPD-SL to SPD or SPD-R;

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=28896

Plastic Flat/reflector adapters;

http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/t...01/SI-PD22D-001-ENG_v1_m56577569830661952.pdf

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/bbb-bpd-90-...nt=BBB-BBB_BPD-90_FeetRest_SPD_Pedal_Adaptors

Metal flat adapters;

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/winwood-decksters-clip-in-adaptors-for-clipless-pedals-black-prod18234/

http://www.rosebikes.co.uk/article/xtreme-pro-adapter/aid:37739

TL-PD63 here;

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/shimano-pedal-cone-adjusting-tool-prod20058/

TL-PD33 here

http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/shimano-tl-pd33-pedal-cone-adjusting-tool-prod20063/

More tool info;

http://www.starmtb.com/img/shimano/pdf/Tools_serviceparts_2008.pdf

Dead link;
http://www.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/tech_support/tech_tips.download.-Par50rparsys-0036-downloadFile.html/09)%20Tools.pdf
Wayback machine version of above dead link;
http://web.archive.org/web/20120106015846/http://www.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/tech_support/tech_tips.download.-Par50rparsys-0036-downloadFile.html/09)%20Tools.pdf

Ergon Cleat setting tool;

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=37987

cleat compatibility;

http://pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-031/index.html

Intro to SPDs for MTBing

http://www.thebikeshack.com/t-Pedals.aspx

Sheldon Brown/John Allen's take on pedals including SPDs

http://sheldonbrown.com/shoe-pedal.html

Some of Jobst Brandt's views on SPDs and float in general (not all of which I agree with)

http://yarchive.net/bike/spd.html
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DaveS

Active Member
Location
Suffolk UK
Hugely comprehensive thanks, a great resource. Have used SPDs on and off since their introduction. Mainly off, because in decades of trying I have never found the secret of making them quiet, and the 'SPD Squeak' drives an OCD nut like me insane.
 

zacklaws

Veteran
Location
Beverley
Nice lengthy post.........but where can I find a SPD-l cleat adaptor plate to fit a road shoe which I have stripped a thread on somehow. I have searched high and low and gave up. All shops tell me they make them for SPD but not SPD-L
 

DaveS

Active Member
Location
Suffolk UK
Tried a hard wax, or chain lube on bolts, cleats, and pedal surfaces?
Ha ha, natch! Hard wax lasts best but in warm summer temps is gone in about an hour. The problem is the sole pontoons rubbing on the pedal body at 3 and 9 o'clock. Always some movement there and it gets worse as the shoes wear.
 

DaveS

Active Member
Location
Suffolk UK
Nice lengthy post.........but where can I find a SPD-l cleat adaptor plate to fit a road shoe which I have stripped a thread on somehow. I have searched high and low and gave up. All shops tell me they make them for SPD but not SPD-L
You can sometimes remove the stripped metal assembly through the sole plate inside the shoe and insert a new one. Will check my parts bin and see if I have a spare.
 

DaveS

Active Member
Location
Suffolk UK
Nice lengthy post.........but where can I find a SPD-l cleat adaptor plate to fit a road shoe which I have stripped a thread on somehow. I have searched high and low and gave up. All shops tell me they make them for SPD but not SPD-L
I have this one. No idea what shoe it came from, but nevertheless its yours if you want it

20150101_163039-1_zpsbhcscvyp.jpg
 

DaveS

Active Member
Location
Suffolk UK
Nice lengthy post.........but where can I find a SPD-l cleat adaptor plate to fit a road shoe which I have stripped a thread on somehow. I have searched high and low and gave up. All shops tell me they make them for SPD but not SPD-L
I have also been successful in the past drilling through the stripped thread right into the shoe, cutting away some of the inner sole plate and using a but and bolt.
 

zacklaws

Veteran
Location
Beverley
My big problem is, the insole in the shoe is very well glued down (I've tried) and to remove it will be a very destructive job by either ripping it out, or trying to cut a piece away to get access and then I have to get it perfectly flat again else it could be unbearable on a long ride, ripping it out is the best option as I then don't have to worry about having to make a smooth patch to cover a hole, so unless I can be 100% sure that a part will fit I do not want to go down that avenue yet and going to look at the simplest way, One pair of my shoes has a cut away panel to make it easy to do such a job.

But you have gave me an idea thankfully for both the simple job and the hard job, drill through and replace it with just a nut to fit the normal cleat bolt as you say, or drill through all three positions with a tiny drill to identify their locations under the insole and then that will help me to perform "keyhole surgery" to fit a new plate if it comes to it, maybe even able to just make a slit and slide it in and out. The alternate I have been looking at is retap it to a larger size bolt.

How it went initially is a mystery, it never even got close to being tight enough and just went loose as I turned the torque wrench, I'd even checked before starting that it was not cross threaded, I was that gutted, I just went straight online and bought another pair of shoes.
 
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