Suspension Seatpost, Worth It?

Discussion in 'General Cycling Discussions' started by Spoons47, 14 Sep 2018.

  1. Spoons47

    Spoons47 Well-Known Member

    Afternoon All.
    If you have time on your busy Friday evening, would welcome your thoughts!
    Being as I do all road riding on my Hybrid I have swapped out front suspension for suspension corrected and have saved a massive kilo and a half.
    So the bike also has a suspension seatpost it’s only a single bolt adjuster and also annoyingly moves from side to side. Given how Anal I am about saddle position and correct bike fit, also the bike that cost £625 new, would the seatpost be of a lower quality? I’m thinking to replace it with a standard one with 2 bolt adjuster to help with fine tuning saddle position.
    Looking forward to replies to keep me company on a quiet night shift.
    Cheers.
     
  2. Globalti

    Globalti Legendary Member

    Get a carbon post from Carbon Components, it will weigh almost nothing and the flexibility will give you a smooth ride.
     
    tom73 likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    Spoons47

    Spoons47 Well-Known Member

    Thanks, do you mean Carbon Cycles? The website is pretty rubbish. I’ve ordered a cheap one from amazon mainly because of their excellent returns policy, so I can give it a try.
     
  4. MikeG

    MikeG Veteran

    Location:
    Suffolk
    I see what you did there.

    I have it on one bike, not on the other. The only time I miss it is if I hit a pot hole. So, I came up with a plan: don't hit pot holes any more.
     
    snorri and tom73 like this.
  5. OP
    OP
    Spoons47

    Spoons47 Well-Known Member

    Hee hee well spotted
     
  6. AndyRM

    AndyRM XOXO

    Location:
    Whitley Bay
    Just get a standard seatpost. Doesn't have to be carbon or anything fancy, but it'll be better than one which wobbles around.
     
    snorri likes this.
  7. Globalti

    Globalti Legendary Member

    Denis99 likes this.
  8. Touch wood I've only had one knee injury in my cycling career and that was when I tried a suspension seat post so IMO replace.
     
    Last edited: 14 Sep 2018
  9. OP
    OP
    Spoons47

    Spoons47 Well-Known Member

    Thanks for responses so far. I’ll try the cheap amazon one tomorrow then can upgrade if I need to. You never know might get lucky only doing 50-60 miles a week! Plus there are plenty of branded secondhand ones out there.
     
    HLaB likes this.
  10. Spoked Wheels

    Spoked Wheels Guru

    Location:
    Bournemouth
    I've got a CF seat post and I'd be lying if I said I can tell the difference with the others lol
     
    Banjo likes this.
  11. tyred

    tyred Legendary Member

    Location:
    Ireland
    I genuinely can't see why it would make a difference what the seatpost is made from. You may have perhaps 4"-8" of seatpost sticking out of the frame. Any possible flex will be minimal compared to other areas of the frame.
     
    Alan O, Banjo and SkipdiverJohn like this.
  12. SkipdiverJohn

    SkipdiverJohn Über Member

    Location:
    London
    Nor can I. A seatpost is a seatpost, let's not overthink the issue here. I've got both alloy and steel ones on different steel bikes and the only difference is the alloy ones weigh less. Maybe we haven't received enough marketing brainwashing yet from the cycling industry, hence us still thinking that a seatpost is merely something that mounts your saddle on?.
     
    Alan O and Banjo like this.
  13. OP
    OP
    Spoons47

    Spoons47 Well-Known Member

    I agree about the material it is made from. I just don’t want it moving from side to side and would really like to fine tune saddle position with a two belt adjustment.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    Spoons47

    Spoons47 Well-Known Member

    Belt should read bolt.
     
  15. Globalti

    Globalti Legendary Member

    A carbon or even alloy post will flex much more than a frame! It is unsecured at one end! If you ride behind somebody with a carbon post you'll see it flexing and on a mountain bike you'll feel it flex if you ride though a dip. Carbon is the ideal material for a seatpost.
     
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