tent poles

bygone era

Über Member
for those of you who camp do you prefer poles that are under the flysheet or those that are above the flysheet and are mesh pole sleeves better than fabric ones for durability ie rubbing together or snagging just curious
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
As with anything, many viewpoints. I prefer poles under the flysheet, and fabric pole sleeves. I think snagging is just a matter of impatience. But I have time, as I used to quit at least an hour before sunset to make camp, or hide out or put up the tent when storms threaten, as opposed to some who try to do everything when the downpour is upon them.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
The best tent I've ever had is a Litchfield 'Viper 2' it's a Canadiene type tent, 2 upright poles 1 a lot shorter than the other and it pitches 'fly first' then the inner hangs inside on 2 hooks. You can get the fly out and set up in a minute or so then get out of any rain.

Of my more 'modern' tents I prefer the poles to be inside the fly but it is a faff erecting them, I think 10 minutes was my record for getting set up. :rain:
 
Location
London
All my tents have the poles inside the fly. I did tear one sleeve (within the fly) when a pole snapped of its own accord though that may partly have been my impatience in extracting the broken bits.

My favourite tent (robens lodge 2) has hooks on the inner which attach to the dome shaped poles erected outside it. The fly then gets chucked over the top.

I quite like this arrangement for apparent toughness and simplicity though it does have certain issues:

+ It is inner first erection so a problem if it's chucking it down.
+ Getting the fly on in high winds might be an issue though not seriously so far.

To my eyes, poles on the outside does look kinda modern and clever. Are there any drawbacks to this system?
 
Last edited:

Low Gear Guy

Über Member
Location
Surrey
I assume that poles on the outside are used with outer first pitching. I prefer to set up the outer first as there is shelter for clipping the inner into position during heavy rain. The inner should not get wet at all.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
I assume that poles on the outside are used with outer first pitching. I prefer to set up the outer first as there is shelter for clipping the inner into position during heavy rain. The inner should not get wet at all.
I'd be worried about external poles like that catching the wind, mind you I've been the only tent left on a Campsite after all the rest had been blown off or taken down and driven away (I was backpacking at the time so had no option other than to stay)
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
Fabric sleeved poles on outer fly my preference.

Doesn't snag so long as you're concentrating.

Inner can often go up at same time already clipped inside but stays dry.

Can get mine up in less than three mins.

It's not called a 'Moment' for nowt.

Can't abide tent faffing at end of long day, or if yr pitching late, and nearly dark, somewhere stealthy.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
Fabric sleeved poles on outer fly my preference.

Doesn't snag so long as you're concentrating.

Inner can often go up at same time already clipped inside but stays dry.

Can get mine up in less than three mins.

It's not called a 'Moment' for nowt.

Can't abide tent faffing at end of long day, or if yr pitching late, and nearly dark, somewhere stealthy.
That last part, you've not tried pitching/striking in poor light, when you've the chance?
 
Location
London
:smile:

Tips welcomed for reverse psychology techniques to get the landowner to beg you to stay in their beautiful spot living off the fat of the land.


Have never erected a tent with both bits pre attached even when the design allows it - I suppose I'.m concerned about tangling and duvet filling type faff. And packing damage from any hard bits on tent skin. Maybe a. Old fashioned but prefer to pack both bits separately. Helps stop moisture transfer as well.

Decathlon do some very clever looking things where I think the whole caboodle is pre attached, including I think the poles (though possibly not your bed) but am afraid I am even more wary of those.
 
Last edited:

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
:smile:

Tips welcomed for reverse psychology techniques to get the landowner to beg you to stay in their beautiful spot living off the fat of the land.


Have never erected a tent with both bits pre attached even when the design allows it - I suppose I'.m concerned about tangling and duvet filling type faff. And packing damage from any hard bits on tent skin. Maybe a. Old fashioned but prefer to pack both bits separately. Helps stop moisture transfer as well.

Decathlon do some very clever looking things where I think the whole caboodle is pre attached, including I think the poles (though possibly not your bed) but am afraid I am even more wary of those.
Never had a problem with all those fearful, things you mention.

But always glad to have a hand with weeding etc here, plenting of pitching space even.

Although in two days in you might be begging to leave.

The 'country life' can be rewarding, but hard graft too despite all the romanticised nonsense that gets attached to it, by townies..

If you're sensible, most landowners won't even know you are there, esp if you scarper quickish in the morning.

And most aren't going to stress about a bit of flattened grass, obv if you're damaging stuff, setting fires, or leaving waste, it's a different matter.
It's just common sense really.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
Never had a problem with all those fearful, things you mention.

But always glad to have a hand with weeding etc here, plenting of pitching space even.

Although in two days in you might be begging to leave.

The 'country life' can be rewarding, but hard graft too despite all the romanticised nonsense that gets attached to it, by townies..

If you're sensible, most landowners won't even know you are there, esp if you scarper quickish in the morning.

And most aren't going to stress about a bit of flattened grass, obv if you're damaging stuff, setting fires, or leaving waste, it's a different matter.
It's just common sense really.
The only problem I've encountered is when there's thefts in the area. They get protective, and wary of signs of anyone using the land.
 

mudsticks

Obviously an Aubergine
The only problem I've encountered is when there's thefts in the area. They get protective, and wary of signs of anyone using the land.
This is true, and a fair worry for some, I'm sure.

I get round all that by running ancient (but still serviceable) kit.

Which has very little resale value**

** in case any lightfingered cycle chatters are reading this. :shy:
 
Top Bottom