The Big Match Revisited

Ludwig

Hopeless romantic
Location
Lissingdown
What a wonderful programme The Big Match Revisited is showing games from the 1970s presented by Brian Moore. There was no shirt sponsorship, they were mostly British players and when they retired they often went into ordinary jobs or set up businesses because they didn't earn the mega wages of today. The pitches were very muddy and the players seemed to be much friendlier and more open than they are today. It was a golden era with lots of skill pace and some amazing characters. The ageing players would drift down the leagues as they got slower which you rarely get these days. Many of the old stadiums have been demolished to mske way for the retail complex type ground that lack the character of the old grounds and the clubs were owned by local people. The 70s truly was a magical and wonderful time to be a football fan.
 

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
Everything you say resonates with me. I followed Hull City in the 60s and 70s. We would travel 20 miles by bus to Hull and then take the train from Hull Paragon Station to Hull Citys ground at Boothferry Park. Hull City was the only club in the football league to have its own train platform. We would watch from Bunkers Hill. There was no shelter from the elements and so in the summer you would roast and in the winter you would freeze. The changing rooms were dire by all accounts and opposition teams hated visiting. We had players like Ken Wagstaff, Chris Chilton and Peter Swan. Names that are hed with great affektion in Hull, even today.
 

PaulB

Legendary Member
Location
Colne
What a wonderful programme The Big Match Revisited is showing games from the 1970s presented by Brian Moore. There was no shirt sponsorship, they were mostly British players and when they retired they often went into ordinary jobs or set up businesses because they didn't earn the mega wages of today. The pitches were very muddy and the players seemed to be much friendlier and more open than they are today. It was a golden era with lots of skill pace and some amazing characters. The ageing players would drift down the leagues as they got slower which you rarely get these days. Many of the old stadiums have been demolished to mske way for the retail complex type ground that lack the character of the old grounds and the clubs were owned by local people. The 70s truly was a magical and wonderful time to be a football fan.
You're correct in your summing up there (although anyone agreeing would have to be of a 'certain' age!)

The stadiums certain held more character than the soulless bowls we are building nowadays. Sunderland and Middlesbrough's grounds were especially nerve-shredding to visit in a way they just aren't now. In one way, that's good because the chances of being bushwhacked and robbed of possessions just aren't there any more but neither are the characters and the connections felt with the players. You could go into certain pubs and clubs in Liverpool and get to speak to Steve Macmanaman or Gary Stanley and the likes. The players are on a different planet now and don't frequent the places the likes of us go to.

Also, there are quite a few ex-players who still run pubs and you speak to them and they are dismissive of just how soft players are nowadays. They are fitter, faster and have better nutrition for sure but ask them to run 6 miles in the rain and they'll cite Human Rights legislation at you - or their bloody agents will!
 

weareHKR

Senior Member
Everything you say resonates with me. I followed Hull City in the 60s and 70s. We would travel 20 miles by bus to Hull and then take the train from Hull Paragon Station to Hull Citys ground at Boothferry Park. Hull City was the only club in the football league to have its own train platform. We would watch from Bunkers Hill. There was no shelter from the elements and so in the summer you would roast and in the winter you would freeze. The changing rooms were dire by all accounts and opposition teams hated visiting. We had players like Ken Wagstaff, Chris Chilton and Peter Swan. Names that are hed with great affektion in Hull, even today.
Spot on @steveindenmark :okay:
 

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
Some excellent points @Ludwig . A nice compromise between the 60s and now would be good.
True story.
Late 60s early 70s I took MrsD onto the mighty kop (I think we were playing Ipswich). Pre match, all the banter, someone shouts out "watch your language lads, there's a lady here".
I shouted "that's no lady, that's my wife"
 

stephec

Legendary Member
Location
Bolton
I know it's always difficult to compare athletes from different eras, but could you imagine what some of the players from those days would be like with access to modern sports science and nutrition?
 

PaulB

Legendary Member
Location
Colne
I've watched full games from the 1960s on some teams' channels and the players of yore we used to idolise look nothing like the players of the modern era. They were tougher and could play on ploughed fields but the pace was the equivalent of non-league games of nowadays. Even the women's game of today has better actual players than we had in the 60s and early 70s.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
I know it's always difficult to compare athletes from different eras, but could you imagine what some of the players from those days would be like with access to modern sports science and nutrition?
It isn't a gimme that all of the players from that era could have adapted to the skill and fitness levels needed today, just as many modern players would not have survived in the more brutal days of yore.
 

stephec

Legendary Member
Location
Bolton
It isn't a gimme that all of the players from that era could have adapted to the skill and fitness levels needed today, just as many modern players would not have survived in the more brutal days of yore.
There was a few with skills that could still do it today, look at the way George Best used to get kicked all over the place but still get up and carry on, if he had lived the modern footballer's lifestyle he'd still stand out today.
 
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