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The primal blueprint .

Discussion in 'Training, Fitness and Health' started by Cuchilo, 5 Jan 2018.

  1. Cuchilo

    Cuchilo Prize winning member X2

    Location:
    London
    Last edited: 5 Jan 2018
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  2. kernowpaul

    kernowpaul Regular

    Location:
    Penwith
    Ive read that and a couple of the other ones. I started with primal endurance as im training for an ultra marathon this year and a friend of a friend suggested it.

    Have you started trying to incorporate the diet and whole lifestyle element into your life yet?

    I would be interested to hear how you find it, but it seems to be working for me and i notice i suffer now if i have a day where i eat all the things i shouldnt.
     
  3. confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    Read it. Lots of pseudoscience in that book, be warned. That said, the message itself is relatively harmless. Get exercise, eat your fruit and veg, don't eat processed crap, this book is good for those lacking common sense. I would be wary of eating too much meat though, and instead add unprocessed whole grains and legumes to balance out the diet. It borders on ideology, like most fad diets, and fails to backup many claims with evidence.
     
    Last edited: 15 Jan 2018
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  4. OP
    OP
    Cuchilo

    Cuchilo Prize winning member X2

    Location:
    London
    Not read too far into it yet but he does seem to back up everything he says with scientific evidence and names the author of his source .
    To be honest the whole idea is what i pretty much do already , although i thought adding pasta and grain to my diet was a healthy option until reading this book . I dont eat a lot of that anyway .
    I'm not sure how it can be a fad diet as it just says only eat what you can forage or hunt from a man that has seen loads of fad diets to get very close to the top of his sport and suffered because of fad diets / performance diets .
     
    Last edited: 15 Jan 2018
  5. irish on the costa blanca

    irish on the costa blanca day of war = warrior, day of peace = man of peace

    Paleo diet rebranded, also known as the Caveman, Stone Age, Hunter Gatherer or Warrior Diet nothing wrong with it but people have being eating grains and rice for thousands of years mainly without issue, everything in moderation, plus who knows whats in our meats.
     
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  6. OP
    OP
    Cuchilo

    Cuchilo Prize winning member X2

    Location:
    London
    People have been eating sausages for thousands of years , mainly without issue .
     
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  7. irish on the costa blanca

    irish on the costa blanca day of war = warrior, day of peace = man of peace

    indeed and thats the point, people have survived for millennia on all different diets, but one point to consider about these cavemen diets is that who knows how healthy they really were in the long term as the majority didn't live long enough, so a paleo diet from birth as they would have done, who knows what ailments might have awaited them if they lived past 40.
     
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  8. OP
    OP
    Cuchilo

    Cuchilo Prize winning member X2

    Location:
    London
    The book covers that and says there is evidence they lived alot longer than 40 . It was the introduction of farming / wheat / grain that the life expectancy slowly took a nose dive .
     
  9. confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    By all means prove me wrong, but hunter-gathers would almost certainly collect and eat grains and legumes, they were after all, gatherers as well as hunters. There's plenty of anthropological and archaeological evidence to support this, just google it. However a shift to horticulturalism will have allowed humans to massively increase the proportions of cereals and grains to the detriment of other food intakes. They would no longer have to roam so far, as easy calories were on the doorstep. Humans are lazy, they want to conserve resources. If your pantry is stocked with grain for baking bread, suddenly that 2-5 hour trek from the settlement to collect leafy greens looks like a lot of hard work... so to a point I agree with the book, grains are bad for humans... but only humans without self control and knowledge of what it takes to form a good diet. If you only eat grains, and even worse, processed grains, you're definitely going to get sick, or suffer some forms of malnutrition.

    However it's not cereals/grains that make people sick , it's the lack of varied intake. The book states you don't need grains, therefore you shouldn't really eat much of them, and you have fallen for the con, grains are not unhealthy per se. Grains actually are amazing, as they are a fantastic energy source, and wholegrains and cereals keep you full for a long time, the problem in modern western diets stems from eating too many refined grains, which strip out nutritional value and leave behind just the carbs. Anyone who exercises a lot certainly benefits from eat grains, sure, you don't NEED grains to exercise, but it sure doesn't hurt to eat them either, so long as you don't overdo it. The same stands for other foods. If you only eat leafy greens, or meat, or eggs... you're going to get sick. Sedentary desk jockeys however, really ought not to eat too many refined grains for obvious reasons. Let's not forget there is good reason porridge before a 60 mile ride is popular.

    IIRC, this book, as well as other well known paleo diets deny that grains and legumes will have been consumed and important to hunter-gatherers (ideology), and the primal blueprint website goes as far as saying that grains are pointless. This is the crux of it, shunning entire food groups on a whim because of a belief that hunter-gatherers didn't need cereals, grains or legumes, therefore we should avoid them makes it a fad diet in my book.

    Now our ancient hunter gatherers won't have eaten as much grain as the typical westerner does today, and what they did eat likely wasn't refined (white flour, pasta, cake etc). The Mediterranean diet, widely regarded as one of the healthiest in Europe includes lots of grains, cereals & legumes and oils. So grains/legumes are not unhealthy, but should be eaten in moderation and according to your personal requirements.
     
  10. confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    Is this correlation or causation. This is what I mean about the book being ideology, no evidence to backup the claim that falling life expectancy is related to grain specifically.
     
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  11. You've got a book out? ;)
     
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  12. Shortandcrisp

    Shortandcrisp Well-Known Member

    Hunter-gatherers ate what they did because that’s what was available to them. Does it necessarily follow that their diet was therefore any better or worse than our own or anyone else’s?
     
  13. I think the argument may be that the human body evolved to make the best of what was available to hunter gatherers (and therefore that diet is best suited to us now). Not that pre-existing humans rocked up and started hunting and gathering what was available.

    Not saying that I think it's a valid line of argument, just that that's what I think the argument is.
     
  14. confusedcyclist

    confusedcyclist Über Member

    Tree bark was available, lots of it. But we don't eat it... often. :okay:
     
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  15. My new book will propose the approach based on meme theory, that the human body is uniquely adapted to fad diets.
     
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