This may be the best picture you will ever see....

redfox

New Member
Location
Bourne End, UK
Fantastic picture, in spite of your modesty! :blush:

The large format version doesn't fair so well though, maybe 32K is pushing it for a 1024*768 image.

Do you have a larger version sans artefacts? (I fancy a change of wallpaper)
 
OP
Elmer Fudd

Elmer Fudd

Miserable Old Bar Steward
redfox said:
Fantastic picture, in spite of your modesty! :blush:

The large format version doesn't fair so well though, maybe 32K is pushing it for a 1024*768 image.

Do you have a larger version sans artefacts? (I fancy a change of wallpaper)
I can attach the file to a PM if you like (I've got it as my desktop now) or Email you it looks ok on my 'puter
Actual size is 32.1kb and set at 1024x768 but only a 15" monitor, one day I will catch up with technology !!
I can e-mail me mate and see if he can give me a better quality copy
 

JamesAC

Senior Member
Location
London
Alan H said:
Hang about. This isn't a photo at all; it's a set-up by a German astrophysics student. Take a look here.

It's NOT a "real" photograph: the sun and the moon subtend the same angle when seen from the earth: you can see that at a total eclipse.

No way would you see a "small" sun and a "large" moon, as depicted.

Cheers!
 

col

Veteran
That's a cracker EF,so is yours TDLC,iv tried those type but always get blown out.
 

Pete

Guest
JamesAC said:
It's NOT a "real" photograph: the sun and the moon subtend the same angle when seen from the earth: you can see that at a total eclipse.

No way would you see a "small" sun and a "large" moon, as depicted.

Cheers!
Too true - and furthermore, in any picture with the sun and moon that close together, the sun would be so much brighter than the moon that it would totally 'burn out' the image, you wouldn't see anything of the moon at all. This is a common problem with astro pictures of two objects - believe me. Recently Mars (bright, but a lot fainter than either the sun or the moon) passed very close (in line of sight) to the celebrated Crab nebula (fainter still) in the sky, and several of my fellow-astros have been trying to get them both in the same picture, without Mars burning the whole thing out. It ain't easy!

If you're sitting at a desk at work, try picking up an object on your desk which, when held at arms length, will appear the same size as the sun or moon in the sky. Many of you will be surprised! A drawing pin would be way too large!
 
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