Tiagra - Temperamental rear derailleur?

mythste

Veteran
Location
Manchester
No experience, but if you're worried and buying seperates, just throw a 105 rear derailleur on instead? Price difference isnt meteoric.
 
Location
Loch side.
Don't read cycling magazines if you can help it. They spew so much nonsense I can write a book about it.

For example:

"We expect newly built bikes to go through an initial period of adjustment as cables stretch, but in our experience,"
Rubbish, cables don't stretch.

"Tiagra’s rear mechs work very well, but the problem is getting them in their sweet spot."
What's the problem? You turn that little screwy barrelly thing at the back until it hits the sweet spot and go for a ride. They all have a sweet spot and it is easy to find.

Further, all good components, from SRAM to Campag to Shimano, shift perfectly across their ranges.. A Dura Ace doesn't shift quicker, better, smoother or faster than a Tiagra. With a Tiagra fitted, I'll challenge anyone to ride the bike without seeing the derailer and tell me that's a DA or a Tiagra or a 105.

Bhleg! Bike Mags......
 
OP
EasyPeez

EasyPeez

Über Member
but if you're worried and buying seperates, just throw a 105 rear derailleur on instead? Price difference isnt meteoric.
Yeah, if i was upgrading I'd def do as you suggest, but I'm getting a bike that comes with Tiagra groupset. Was supposed to be riding it home to Hull from York this Sunday until I got a call from the bike shop on Saturday pm to say they'd dropped it getting it out of storage and put a big scratch in it :angry:. Did the ride anyway seeing as I'd set the time aside and my friend had already bought his train ticket to join me, and a very pleasant one it was too, even on my old MTB chugger.

But yeah, back to the topic....it comes with Tiagra which was great when I test rode it and which I've only read good things about on here, but then I saw that review today and started to worry. Still, seems most on here are having no problems. Thanks for your feedback everyone :smile:
 
OP
EasyPeez

EasyPeez

Über Member
A Dura Ace doesn't shift quicker, better, smoother or faster than a Tiagra.
Seriously?! If so that makes me feel even better about my final choice of bike, as 'settling for' Tiagra was one of the things putting me off. So those huge price hikes are just based on weight and cosmetics? I'd read that lower-spec components are just as durable (sometimes more so) than higher end, but I thought the received wisdom was that 105 shifted better than Tiagra, Tiagra better than Sora etc.
Certainly when I test rode some bikes recently the Tiagra was noticeably smoother and quieter than the Sora. But I guess that could have been down to the way they were set up in the 2 different bike shops...
 
Location
Loch side.
Seriously?! If so that makes me feel even better about my final choice of bike, as 'settling for' Tiagra was one of the things putting me off. So those huge price hikes are just based on weight and cosmetics? I'd read that lower-spec components are just as durable (sometimes more so) than higher end, but I thought the received wisdom was that 105 shifted better than Tiagra, Tiagra better than Sora etc.
Certainly when I test rode some bikes recently the Tiagra was noticeably smoother and quieter than the Sora. But I guess that could have been down to the way they were set up in the 2 different bike shops...
Smoother and quieter can easily be explained by set-up, cable quality and age, quantity of lubricant on the chain and the wear state of the chain. Al being equal, you won't hear a difference.
The difference comes in with the finish - DA for instance is incredibly beautifully finished - as well as durability and of course, weight. I doubt there is a lower end product that is more durable than its most expensive counterpart though. But then again, something like a derailer or a crank lasts so long that the issue is moot anyway. With things like shifters it is important if you do high-mileage in all conditions. Then durability is worth having. For instance, some of the Campag shifters have bearings instead of bushings like on the cheaper models.

The big price difference always comes with products at the leading edge of al product cycle. You pay for R&D, tooling etc. This trickles down and is thus cheaper in low-end products. If you compare to derailleurs - one say a Dura Ace and the other a Tiagra, you'll notice that the Dura ace one has almost no steel anywhere. Even the bolts are titanium. The cages are carbon or aluminium. On the Tiagra one, the mechanical design will be similar but the bolts will be steel, the cages steel, the spring will have a cheaper coating on, the graphics will be painted instead of laser etched, the jockey wheels will have bushings instead of ball bearings (or vice versa) etc etc. The difference in weight is quite phenomenal as well. It isn't all that obvious when you handle only the high-end product but if you handle both, the difference is startling.

But the beauty of cycling nowadays is that performance is not compromised on low-end components. They all work incredibly well. There is obviously a threshold below which a sport cyclist shouldn't delve. Some components with Shimano on them are really only meant for a few occasional rides directly after Christmas day and then meant to be scrapped. Nothing wrong with that. It is what it is.
 
My 10 speed tiagra needed a new cable at 3 AM in the wilds of Scotland. The volunteer mechanic, who'd only ever worked with down tubes shifters, was able to replace cable and index it perfectly when I'd finished my ration of sleep. No complaints at all.

The right brifter failed after 12,000km but then I got to replace both with some tasty 105s, so I was nearly happy.
 

PpPete

Guru
Location
Chandler's Ford
Don't read cycling magazines if you can help it. They spew so much nonsense I can write a book about it.

For example:

"We expect newly built bikes to go through an initial period of adjustment as cables stretch, but in our experience,"
Rubbish, cables don't stretch.

"Tiagra’s rear mechs work very well, but the problem is getting them in their sweet spot."
What's the problem? You turn that little screwy barrelly thing at the back until it hits the sweet spot and go for a ride. They all have a sweet spot and it is easy to find.

Further, all good components, from SRAM to Campag to Shimano, shift perfectly across their ranges.. A Dura Ace doesn't shift quicker, better, smoother or faster than a Tiagra. With a Tiagra fitted, I'll challenge anyone to ride the bike without seeing the derailer and tell me that's a DA or a Tiagra or a 105.

Bhleg! Bike Mags......
As usual some pure fantasy mixed in with the otherwise sound sense from Mr Saddle.
New cables don't stretch ?
What brand is that, pray tell?
 
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