Time to trade the saddle?

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Stevie135, 1 Aug 2012.

  1. Stevie135

    Stevie135 Regular

    Location:
    Liverpool
    Hello All

    After taking some advice from this group and elsewhere, I decided to ditch the gel cover, invest in some decent padded shorts and replace the saddle on my Boardman hybrid comp for something a little more decent.

    I went with the Selle Italian C2 and all seemed well at first, However 130 plus miles in and the saddle is getting more uncomfortable rather than better (hardly noticed it first time out).

    Because I'm only in the 4th full week of using my bike, I have been slowly increasing seat height (think its about right now) and I'm wondering if this is a factor. Also because I find myself having to re-
    settle myself all the time I've adjusted the seat angle too, something with the front of the saddle lower seems to help.

    The discomfort is mostly around my sit bones so I'm presuming the saddle isn't too narrow (if I set the saddle horizontal a get pain in the soft tissues in the middle).

    Does it sound like I've gone for the wrong saddle here and should I be looking to trade in or should I adjust for maximum comfort and let things "break in"? I am carrying too much weight so don't know if I've been unrealistic with a slimline saddle!

    Many thanks for any advice

    Steve
     
  2. middleagecyclist

    middleagecyclist Call me MAC

    Do I get this right. You've only been cycling regularly for 4 weeks? I take it then you have been increasing your distance a little every ride or so. 130 miles on the Selle? 32 miles a week or thereabouts? I think it might just be your arse getting used to increased time in the saddle.

    I use a Brooks B17 on my main bike and it's like a pair of comfy old slippers. I can do miles and miles on it without any discomfort. I have a narrow (don't know the make) saddle on my RB and a Marin saddle on my MTB. I can do miles on these also without problems. The thing is, when I started I couldn't do much more than 10 miles on anything without a lot of discomfort.

    Wish you luck getting it sorted. You might just need to give it more time but if that doesn't help you really need someone who knows a bit about bikes to have a look at your position.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Stevie135

    Stevie135 Regular

    Location:
    Liverpool
    Thanks for the advice, I commute about 23 miles a day generally between 2 and 4 times a week plus the odd leisure ride at weekends so I've probably done closer to 200 miles on this saddle now that I come to work it out.

    Did suspect it was me getting used to it but thought it would be getting better not worse. Is the Brooks a slim saddle or a wider one? I know it sounds shallow but I didn't want to ruin the looks of the bike with something too large!

    Cheers

    Steve
     
  4. middleagecyclist

    middleagecyclist Call me MAC

    If you have to ask about spoiling looks on a bike then you probably don't want a Brooks B17!
    saddles-795105.bmp.jpg

    and here is my actual worn in saddle on my main bike

    santos%2520heaton.jpg
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Stevie135

    Stevie135 Regular

    Location:
    Liverpool
    It does look comfy though!!
     
  6. middleagecyclist

    middleagecyclist Call me MAC

    Like old slippers (but not nearly as smelly!)
     
  7. albion

    albion Veteran

    Location:
    South Tyneside
    I bought padded bib shorts and found them uncomfortable after 30 or so miles.
    I'm hoping they feel better when tried again next winter.

    I'm now using a half decent gel cover which seems fine for 100 mile rides.
    As said it has to be conditioning too.
     
  8. wheres_my_beard

    wheres_my_beard Über Member

    Location:
    Norwich
    I too have a Brooks. A Swift. As show here (any excuse to show my bike off)...

    th_DSC01667.jpg

    I've had it 4 months, and it's the best saddle I've ridden on in 25 years on a bike (not continuously, obviously).

    It sounds like your saddle is breaking your rear in rather than the other way round. Which isn't right.
     
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