Tubeless question

gmw492

Senior Member
hi,
I am buying a new bike and have a choice of 3 on my shortlist, all come with tubeless tyres.I have seen videos on them and they seem pretty much puncture proof due to the self sealant supplied.Now I know nothing is certain and they are not 100% as you see the pros getting punctures.
My question is and forgive my lack of knowledge on this but if they did fail is that you stuck, as with innertubes you can carry a spare and change it, but with a tubeless tyre its not as if you can carry a spare one of those, so is there any other way or is it just as I see it.
Thanks
 

Jody

Veteran
You can just pour then wipe the sealant out * if its a clincher and stick a tube in. Unless there is a big gash in the sidewall and then you are stuck anyway.

EDIT * if its not slime as that stuff makes a massive mess
 
OP
gmw492

gmw492

Senior Member
You can just pour then wipe the sealant out * if its a clincher and stick a tube in. Unless there is a big gash in the sidewall and then you are stuck anyway.

EDIT * if its not slime as that stuff makes a massive mess
Ah ok so do you carry the sealant with you as a back up in case you lose some out the tyre, yes i see your point if big gash then an inner tube would leave you stuck out :okay:
 

Jody

Veteran
Ah ok so do you carry the sealant with you as a back up in case you lose some out the tyre, yes i see your point if big gash then an inner tube would leave you stuck out :okay:
You will loose very little from the tyre due to a puncture. I use about 100ml on my MTB tyres. They will require topping up every 4-6 months depending on where they have been stored and temperature. Just pop the valve core out and inject some more with a syringe. No need to carry sealant round with you.
 
hi,
I am buying a new bike and have a choice of 3 on my shortlist, all come with tubeless tyres.I have seen videos on them and they seem pretty much puncture proof due to the self sealant supplied.Now I know nothing is certain and they are not 100% as you see the pros getting punctures.
My question is and forgive my lack of knowledge on this but if they did fail is that you stuck, as with innertubes you can carry a spare and change it, but with a tubeless tyre its not as if you can carry a spare one of those, so is there any other way or is it just as I see it.
Thanks
Road pro's dont use Tubeless tyres they use Tubular tyres but yes you can stick a tube in so I carry one I was glad on the LEJOG when a spoke hole blew out (no sealant was fixing that).

Corrected thanks to @FishFright :becool:
 
Last edited:

FishFright

More wheels than sense
Pro's dont use Tubeless tyres they use Tubular tyres but yes you can stick a tube in so I carry one I was glad on the LEJOG when a spoke hole blew out (no sealant was fixing that).
Pro mountain bike racers all , with a few exceptions , all use tubeless tyres. As a very, very amateur mtber I don't ... yet.
 

Pedropete

Über Member
Location
West Sussex, UK
Carry the same spares you would if running tubed: spare tube, patches, lever/s, tyre boot, pump/CO2.
Also add: spare valve core, valve core remover and tubeless plugs (‘worms’) & insertion tool. If tyre’s too shagged to seal with a plug then clean out the sealant, boot the tyre (if needed) and stick the tube in.
 
They are no more puncture resistant than most clincher tyres. Puncture resistance isn’t the main point of tubeless tyres, the lack of a tube is. You can’t get pinch flats, so you can run lower pressures, and get better comfort, and they are lighter. If you do get a puncture, in a tubeless set up, out on the road, getting them reseated and refilled with sealant is a messy bugger of a job. It’s best to carry a spare inner tube, to get you home. This completely negates the benefit of a tubeless set up though.
 

lazyfatgit

Guest
Location
Lawrence, NSW
Carry an inner tube. If the sealant hasn't done the job most of it will have sprayed out if the holes big. Not really that messy putting a tube in once you've removed the valve.

Ive had 2 punctures that i know of which sealed. One small piece of glass and a decent gash which sprayed sealant all down the back of the seat tube but sealed and got me home without having to reinflate.

Yes the tyres are harder to seat and there was a bit a faff involved initially with the road bike (mtb was super easy) but i wont go back to inner tubes unless budget is an issue (cheap tubeless tyres don't seem to be available)
 

screenman

Legendary Member
In 10 years of being tubeless I have never had a puncture stop the ride, I have though pulled up to a dozen thorns out of the tyres when servicing them, these would have punctured a tube.
 
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