Tyre Sizes

MartB1

New Member
Hello,

Newbie here and to cycling. I have a mtb with 27.5x2.3 tyres. The rear tyre is going bald in the centre of the tred so need to replace it. I'm having a hard time finding local dealers that have the size I need.

Is it possible for a 27.5x2.2 tyre to fit on my wheel safely? And will i need to replace the front wheel to the same size or just leave as is?

Many thanks
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
2.2 will be fine, or even a 2.4 may fit. Different sizes are not unusual these days, but it is typically the front tyre that is the bigger one on an MTB. Just to confuse thing further, same size tyres from different manufacturers can measure up differently in reality, meaning just ordering tyres with the same numbers on is no guarantee of getting something that is physically the same when placed side by side.
 
2.2 will be fine, or even a 2.4 may fit. Different sizes are not unusual these days, but it is typically the front tyre that is the bigger one on an MTB. Just to confuse thing further, same size tyres from different manufacturers can measure up differently in reality, meaning just ordering tyres with the same numbers on is no guarantee of getting something that is physically the same when placed side by side.
I didn't know that. Just shows how much attention I pay to my tyres...
 

simongt

Über Member
Location
Norwich
Bigger as in wider, is not uncommon.
And of course, frequently a different tread pattern. Some I've observed even come with a rotation specific depending on what surface you're riding over. I suppose that when you suddenly come across dry gravel after some distance on loose mud, you simply hop off, swap the tyres round and carry on - ! ^_^
 
And of course, frequently a different tread pattern. Some I've observed even come with a rotation specific depending on what surface you're riding over. I suppose that when you suddenly come across dry gravel after some distance on loose mud, you simply hop off, swap the tyres round and carry on - ! ^_^
I was told I should do this with snow tyres whenever I came to cleared road...
 

T4tomo

Veteran
And of course, frequently a different tread pattern. Some I've observed even come with a rotation specific depending on what surface you're riding over. I suppose that when you suddenly come across dry gravel after some distance on loose mud, you simply hop off, swap the tyres round and carry on - ! ^_^
Works with rim brakes, not so easy with discs!
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
There's a bit too much overthinking going on here. For 99% of non-competitive, casual MTB riders, it isn't going to matter a monkey's if one tyre is marginally narrower or wider than the other, has a slightly different tread pattern, or is fitted so it rotates in the "wrong" direction. Just fit whatever is easily available that offers the required characteristics, (such as puncture protection), at the best value price.
I've just reversed the front wheel on a 26" MTB hack bike, in order to get the last vestage of life out of the tyre before I bin it. Being knobbly it has developed a distinctive wear pattern on the shoulder lugs, and reversing the rotation will wear off the previously unworn areas, probably at an accelerated rate if the increase in road noise from the tyre is anything to go by. Cornering grip on dirt/gravel has actually improved slightly, and if I get another two or three hundred miles service out of them, then I'll be happy with that. .
 

Jody

Veteran
it isn't going to matter a monkey's if one tyre is............... fitted so it rotates in the "wrong" direction.

I've just reversed the front wheel on a 26" MTB hack bike, in order to get the last vestage of life out of the tyre before I bin it........ Cornering grip on dirt/gravel has actually improved slightly,
I agree with most of what your saying but that's a slight contradiction. Whilst road and mild riding won't matter which direction the tyre points it definitely makes a difference when it matters.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
I agree with most of what your saying but that's a slight contradiction. Whilst road and mild riding won't matter which direction the tyre points it definitely makes a difference when it matters.
No argument from me, but remember 99% of cyclists who buy MTBs do little more with them than pootle around on stretches of gravel and dirt track that often conveniently link tarmac routes together. This sort of casual use is unlikely to ever exceed the performance of even the most basic knobbly tyre design, and the bit of extra traction afforded by correctly deployed directional treads will never be called upon. For serious use, it does matter, but for the typical leisure/utility rider, who would probably manage equally well on a 700c hybrid, they are just getting suckered by marketing hype to believe that a) they really need an MTB, b) the MTB really needs suspension, and c) the choice of tyre is absolutely crucial - when in reality pretty much any robust tyre would suffice, along with many varieties of non-MTB bike.
 
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