Using a hose to clean the bike

aJohnson

Senior Member
Location
Bury, Manchester
So I read you shouldn't use a high pressure hose to clean a bike is it will blast all of the grease and lube off of the parts, now would it harm the bike anyway if I used a low pressure hose to clean it?
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Not if you just trickle the water over the bike. Keep it away from the bearings though.

Never wash the bike upside-down; the water will get into the headset bearings.
 

Grasen

New Member
Location
CF24
I don't believe it - todays bikes aren't waterproof? You can't wash them?

Can you ride them in the rain?

If you bike (and you) fall in a puddle - what then? Does it dissolve?

Too much rubbish on the internet if you ask me.
Buy a bike and ride it !
Clean it and oil it when necessary.

Sorry, just had to get that off my chest.
 

02GF74

Über Member
I am sure a garden hose is fine; or else a bucket and brush; can't say have notice any problems by using the former.
 

andyhunter

New Member
Location
northern ireland
make sure if it is any hose its not that powerful as you would end up removing the oil/lube/grease and even paint or graphics. a standard hose that is used to water grass would be fine but a powerwasher well i would not go there. anyways you should always dry off your bike and then relube your bike after a wash to maintain it :blush:
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
Driving cars through floods will shorten the life of their wheel bearings. Bikes are better sealed against the elements than they used to be, but water can still get in under adverse conditions (eg. a horizontal high pressure spray).
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
The problem with cars in floods is suddenly immersing a hot transmission in cold water - the moist air inside the transmission condenses creating a vacuum and sucking water in through seals. There should be a breather tube but these usually get blocked. The water combines with the oil in an imperfect emulsion where bacteria can grow and soon your gears are being lubricated by a gopping stinking greenish slime instead of nice fresh oil.
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
Globalti said:
The problem with cars in floods is suddenly immersing a hot transmission in cold water - the moist air inside the transmission condenses creating a vacuum and sucking water in through seals. There should be a breather tube but these usually get blocked. The water combines with the oil in an imperfect emulsion where bacteria can grow and soon your gears are being lubricated by a gopping stinking greenish slime instead of nice fresh oil.

That's another problem with cars in floods. But we're getting off topic.
 

J4CKO

New Member
I have used a pressure washer on mine for years, its common sense to just use the pressure where its needed and not where it will blast water in, saves a lot of time and if you are lubricating once clean anyway I dont see the problem.
 
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