What’s a good bike?

Jamzymc

New Member
I need a bike to travel too and from work about 18 miles round trip. I want something comfortable but also quite quick. I’m also looking for a bike to start trailing on. Ive been looking at a trek roscoe 6 but I think there must be better bikes. I quite liked the vitus nucleus 2018 model my friend let me go on his and I can’t say I’ve ever been on a better bike. Is the 2019 model as good as its past model? I’m looking to spend around £100- 400 on my bike for work don’t mind second hand and around 350- 700 on a bike for trailing on new. Any recommendations would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

Cycleops

Guru
Location
Accra, Ghana
Why do you need two bikes? One can do both those tasks so roll the budget into one and get a better bike.
A grand will get you a good adventure bike which will cope with both roles.
This represents great vfm imho;
https://www.decathlon.co.uk/triban-gravel-rc520.html

BTW welcome to the forum.
 
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Shadow121

Active Member
Two bikes for sale on here if your interested,
https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/2-giant-bikes-for-sale-mine-since-new.252975/#post-5728584

I would buy Two bikes, reason being for roads you need full mudguards to keep you
dry and protect your rain proof cycling jacket, hint, do you want a black stripe up
the back of your nice bright I luminous jacket after the first wet run.
A carrier may also come in handy for the road bike,
and you probably don’t want either of the above on a trail bike, unless your
going long distances more akin to a traveling bike as opposed to hopping
around some roots jumps and gravel.
 

rivers

How far can I go?
Location
Bristol
Two bikes for sale on here if your interested,
https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/2-giant-bikes-for-sale-mine-since-new.252975/#post-5728584

I would buy Two bikes, reason being for roads you need full mudguards to keep you
dry and protect your rain proof cycling jacket, hint, do you want a black stripe up
the back of your nice bright I luminous jacket after the first wet run.
A carrier may also come in handy for the road bike,
and you probably don’t want either of the above on a trail bike, unless your
going long distances more akin to a traveling bike as opposed to hopping
around some roots jumps and gravel.
Or just some detachable mudguards like raceblade xls....
 

SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
Commuting bike - bought secondhand, steel frame, mudguards & rack, low-end components, unfashionable or dull uninteresting paint job & Schwalbe Marathon tyres. Something that will get you where you need to be with no fuss, and will still be there when you come back to it for the return journey. Bikes for utility use don't need to be "good" ones beyond being reliable; their main requirement is simply not to get stolen.
 

jowwy

The bearded Powerhouse
Commuting bike - bought secondhand, steel frame, mudguards & rack, low-end components, unfashionable or dull uninteresting paint job & Schwalbe Marathon tyres. Something that will get you where you need to be with no fuss, and will still be there when you come back to it for the return journey. Bikes for utility use don't need to be "good" ones beyond being reliable; their main requirement is simply not to get stolen.
Fun sponge......
 

JPBoothy

Über Member
Location
Cheshire
I have gone down the Ebay second hand route for my last two bikes, as you can grab a bargain on a reputable branded bike that has often been bought with good intentions on a BTW scheme but then cast aside after only a dozen rides. If you're not bothered about the latest tech specs even better :okay:
 

SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
I have gone down the Ebay second hand route for my last two bikes, as you can grab a bargain on a reputable branded bike that has often been bought with good intentions on a BTW scheme but then cast aside after only a dozen rides. If you're not bothered about the latest tech specs even better :okay:
I read somewhere on the internet that a Raleigh Royal tourer was priced £343 back in 1987, which I've no reason to disbelieve as decent 531 frame machines have never been cheap. Adjusted for inflation, that is £1,000 today. so I was more than happy to pick one up needing a bit of TLC for £30, and even if it ends up costing me £100 by the time I've got it sorted to my satisfaction, It will still only be 10% of it's original cost. I believe that for many "good intention" bike buyers, their cycling cost for what they got out of their bike in relation to the amount of money they lost on it, is probably higher than if they had travelled by taxi instead!
As for "missing out" on the latest tech, if that includes such nonsense as press-fit BB's. and internally routed cables that rattle and are tricky to replace, then I'm glad to be "missing out".
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
Old steel frames can ride really well if they were good when new. I built up a nice old steel frame as a London commuter in 1997 for £100 and it served me for about 10 years. It is now the daily hack of another local roadie. A good old bike is usually better than a cheap new one.
 

JPBoothy

Über Member
Location
Cheshire
Old steel frames can ride really well if they were good when new. I built up a nice old steel frame as a London commuter in 1997 for £100 and it served me for about 10 years. It is now the daily hack of another local roadie. A good old bike is usually better than a cheap new one.
There always seems to be more satisfaction out of riding a bargain too :bicycle:
 
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SkipdiverJohn

Über Member
Location
London
There always seems to be more satisfaction out of riding a bargain too
Ain't that the truth! Riding along on a nice old 531 steel bike that would have cost the equivalent of £600 to £1,000 in today's money ( in the case of my 3), but bought for way less than a new BSO certainly puts a smile on the dial!

Another reason for me now opting for 'used and decent' over 'new but crap' was after foolishly forking out on a Halfords kids bike for my daughter many moons ago. The bearings in the bottom bracket and hubs sounded dry and noisy from day one. What a piece of crap
I think you have to accept that cheap stuff will have had corners cut during assembly, and personally if I bought a new £100 type of bike I would strip out and regrease all the ball bearings before using it. I've also noticed that mass-produced bikes often have over-tightened wheel bearings from new and i would adjust these as a matter of course. You shouldn't have to pull apart a new bike and reassemble it properly, but the reality is in many cases it's necessary if you want a long-lasting trouble-free ride.
This is one reason I see no disadvantage with buying secondhand bikes then rebuilding them, because in all likelihood I would end up doing exactly the same thing had I bought a new bike anyway.
 

Grant Fondo

Riding backwards into the future
Location
Cheshire
Another reason for me now opting for 'used and decent' over 'new but crap' was after foolishly forking out on a Halfords kids bike for my daughter many moons ago. The bearings in the bottom bracket and hubs sounded dry and noisy from day one. What a piece of crap :thumbsdown:
Yes agree bought my son a muddy fox bike from halfords, shockingly put together. A total brick of a bike. Got him a Marin now, things couldn't be different and he actually likes to ride it.
 
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