What are you reading

steveindenmark

Legendary Member
I have a huge selection of cycle and motorcycling travel books in my collection but I have recently bought a book that I have wanted for a while. Sixty-Six Years As a Cycle Tourist by Cliff Pratt. ISBN 1-85821-229-4

Cliff Pratt is the Mr Cycling of my home town of Hull and started his bike shop in Hull in 1934. The shop is still going strong and I believe has just moved to new premises.

The book covers cycle touring from the 1930s onwards and includes trips to Norway and the Dolomites. In his first year, Cliff notched up 12,165 miles. This was in the days before deurailler gears.

There are so many things that this book covers. Lots of information about new mechanical innovations and cycling clubs of the time. But the whole book is a great read if you can find one.

But some things never change. In the book he talks about the CTC organisation in 1934 when he took over as the District Association Secretary for Hull. He decided to book the Hull City Hall to condemn :

The approval of cyclepath construction

The scandalous conduct of coroners courts when considering fatal road accidents.

Eighty years later and we are still considering the same topics on a regular basis on here.

Its an excellent book which makes you realise how the olden day cyclists were far tougher than what we are.

9ca6e8a2-e9a0-494f-8dad-05c165514cb8_zpscrxierqp.jpg
 

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
Looks like an excellent read.
 

midlife

Guru
Good grief. I worked there and never knew he wrote a book!

Going to have to find a copy :smile:. I also fancied reading the Clements book about Falcon Cycles since I sold and rode them.

Thanks for the heads up. Most appreciated

Shaun
 
I have a huge selection of cycle and motorcycling travel books in my collection but I have recently bought a book that I have wanted for a while. Sixty-Six Years As a Cycle Tourist by Cliff Pratt. ISBN 1-85821-229-4

Cliff Pratt is the Mr Cycling of my home town of Hull and started his bike shop in Hull in 1934. The shop is still going strong and I believe has just moved to new premises.

The book covers cycle touring from the 1930s onwards and includes trips to Norway and the Dolomites. In his first year, Cliff notched up 12,165 miles. This was in the days before deurailler gears.

There are so many things that this book covers. Lots of information about new mechanical innovations and cycling clubs of the time. But the whole book is a great read if you can find one.

But some things never change. In the book he talks about the CTC organisation in 1934 when he took over as the District Association Secretary for Hull. He decided to book the Hull City Hall to condemn :

The approval of cyclepath construction

The scandalous conduct of coroners courts when considering fatal road accidents.

Eighty years later and we are still considering the same topics on a regular basis on here.

Its an excellent book which makes you realise how the olden day cyclists were far tougher than what we are.

9ca6e8a2-e9a0-494f-8dad-05c165514cb8_zpscrxierqp.jpg
I have managed to order a copy of this from the library.
 

midlife

Guru
I have ordered a copy of the Cliff Pratt book via his nephew :smile:

Shaun
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
I've just finished Daniel Mills' "Revenants", which I really enjoyed.

In an unintentional thematic link, I've started on James A. Sharpe's "Witchcraft in Early Modern England".
 

colly

Re member eR
Location
Leeds
[QUOTE 4038169, member: 259"]Very Good, Jeeves, by PG Wodehouse. It's very good![/QUOTE]
I have a couple of collections of Wodehouse which I dip into now and again. Very good but I find the writing style very difficult to get along with.
Not sure why, it's just hard work for me.
 

John the Monkey

Frivolous Cyclist
Location
Crewe
"Allan's Wife" H.R. Rider-Haggard

Not as objectionable as the Bulldog Drummond series (or at least, those of that that I've read) but still quite old fashioned in its attitudes. Nonetheless, I'm enjoying the Allan Quatermain series, attempting to read them in the chronological order suggested here. So far, they've rattled along in fine style, and are exciting and enjoyable enough that I find I can overlook their Imperial era outlook on the world.

"The Art of Capataincy"
Very readable book by Mike Brearley about cricket captaincy - some lovely anecdotes, and very readable, despite my being about as likely to captain a cricket team as I am to have the sort of adventure that Mr. Quatermain does.

"The Junkyard Dog" Robert Campbell
I love Robert Campbell's "Whistler" series, and wish that they were easier to get hold of. This book is the start of his Jimmy Flannery series, and so far has the charm and dry wit of the "Whistler" books. If you have a Kindle, this book was free when I got it, and the others appear to be available through the lending library.
 
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