Yet more real steel. And possibly lots of titanium too.

Another update: a further MRI was taken in February this year specifically to compare with the one from Nov 2020. Deterioration. Along with ongoing problems, it looks like more surgery, and much more complex surgery, at that. Bummer. What it means, if that is the case, is that I will have to attempt to get really seriously fit in order to get through it. Not an easy prospect, but it won't be any time soon...
Well, here we go again, and it's a bit of an "Oh sh*t!" moment.

After many more problems, like the incidental one of being barely able to walk any more, some more MRI scans and a scoliogram were taken last November. As mentioned above, deterioration, on top of that previously noted.

So, now what?
Well, the problem is this: Spine is fused solid from L5 to L2. Decompression work has already been done up to T12. Because the curve has been taken out of my lumbar spine, my entire upper body wants to hinge around that T12 to L2 area, and it's basically coming apart. If I lean over in my chair, my spine emits a loud and very painful 'clunk'. Not a lot of fun.
There are two possible solutions, dependent upon (sigh) another set of CT scans, and some experimental steroid injections into the facet joints in the affected area. This to both help with pain, and if it does, it gives more info as to what's going on.

Solution 1: Monster op where they remove all that has gone before and put in another fusion, properly curved, all the way from L5 to, say, T8 or higher. Instant core strength! This is a a massive op with two slightly different consultant spinal surgeons needed.

Solution 2: if possible, try and achieve a similar result by hammering in a selection of small titanium cages to put a curve in above the current fusion. Less complex and needs only one consultant. But a bit of a bodge, IMHO...Still leaves that flat bit in place.

Personally, the second option seems like a bit of a sticking plaster, and although the first option is a huge undertaking, the result should be more natural.
My back as it is now is considered deformed, despite the fact that they engineered it that way. So the big first op would be under the control of a 'deformity surgeon' (I kid you not).

Given the current state of the NHS generally, this isn't going to happen any time soon, probably not this year. So, as mentioned in the quote, I have to get as seriously fit as I can manage, to deal with what might be six or seven hours of carpentry.
:eek:
 

JohnHughes307

Über Member
Location
Potters Bar
Oh no DC - I can't "like" that... The very best of luck with all this.
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
OMFG..

That was one reason I refused fixing surgery when I broke mine - let it heal - bending/twisting..... long term.. although missing a big part of L1, the discs etc still do what's left to work (accident damage though) - discs still OK for my age.

I snapped in two at L1, with T12 sanpped as well. My L1 is a cheese wedge now. It's not the 'twisty' bit of the spine so I see the 'worry' for you now.

Keep keeping fit.
 
OMFG..

That was one reason I refused fixing surgery when I broke mine - let it heal - bending/twisting..... long term.. although missing a big part of L1, the discs etc still do what's left to work (accident damage though) - discs still OK for my age.

Keep keeping fit.
Unfortunately, the major part of this entire sorry saga is the degeneracy of my discs. Bad discs = few options.
 
Just turned 69. Last shot!
 
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