Yoga

Mad Doug Biker

Bikeoholics Anonymous
Location
Craggy Island
I need to do something about my (quite frankly awful) posture and also get fit too. I have seen an advert for a class (including beginners) locally and am considering going along.

Has anyone else done it, and if so, what is it like?? What are pitfalls to look out for and also, how do you know your instructor is sufficiently qualified and won't cause you an injury??

Thanks.
 
OP
Mad Doug Biker

Mad Doug Biker

Bikeoholics Anonymous
Location
Craggy Island
By the way, if Admin feel this isn't the right place for this, then please move it.

That is all.
 

luckyfox

She's the cats pajamas
Location
County Durham
Go along with an open mind. It's not for everyone, I like it but I find Pilates is better for me. The experience is different for everyone so only you will know if it's for you. Any teacher you can check on a big register online somewhere. If you've never been before just wear comfortable loose clothing and try not to eat within an hour of going.

Best of luck, let us know how you get on!
 

contadino

Über Member
Location
Chesterfield
For improving posture, Alexander Technique or Pilates may be a bit better, but Yoga could definitely help. As a rule of thumb, the more 'hippy dippy' the teacher, the higher the risk of them doing you some damage.

I'm just doing a website for a yoga teacher and much of her work comes from referral by physiotherapists, sports injury clinics and other 'established' medical professionals, so there's clearly something in it.
 

summerdays

Cycling in the sun
Location
Bristol
I do pilates, well I think it's called Fitness Pilates to be precise. I haven't tried yoga so can't comment on the differences. I have slight scoliosis that was giving me pain over a number of years and it has significantly helped with the pain though I've no idea if it's changed the posture at all but I don't think I lean over in a car seat when tired as much as I used to.

The instructor should ask about any medical problems you have, and be prepared to alter exercises to suit individuals, so a gentleman who comes along has a major problem with one shoulder (no idea what exactly), but she will give him specific alterations on some exercises. She also suggests different levels to try an exercise, depending on how easy you find it, or if you find a particular movement painful such as leaning on your wrists.

I don't know her qualifications I must admit but she also teaches at the sports centre so I presume qualified.

And she is now constantly in my ear when I'm cycling telling me to lower my shoulders!!
 

threebikesmcginty

Corn Fed Hick...
Location
...on the slake
I've checked with Mrs McG who is a qualified yoga and pilates teacher, she said yoga would benefit you more but it's really down to whatever suits you, pilates movements all come from yoga anyway.

The teacher should be certified by one of the professional bodies and also carry insurance. Mrs McG trained for over 2 years for the 500 hours course and she also attends training days, etc.

They should be asking you about any injuries/medication you may have, the main thing is - if it hurts, don't do it!
 

ayceejay

Guru
Location
Rural Quebec
Pilates puts more attention on core than does yoga, and is more physical than classical (hatha) yoga although some modern forms are more like stretching and moving.
I think pilates would be a better bet for posture and for sure a good pilates teacher will be well aware of the Alexander Technique. Yoga will help with relaxation of mind and body.
 
OP
Mad Doug Biker

Mad Doug Biker

Bikeoholics Anonymous
Location
Craggy Island
The instructor should ask about any medical problems you have, and be prepared to alter exercises to suit individuals, so a gentleman who comes along has a major problem with one shoulder (no idea what exactly), but she will give him specific alterations on some exercises. She also suggests different levels to try an exercise, depending on how easy you find it, or if you find a particular movement painful such as leaning on your wrists.
What makes you think MDB has a problem with his wrists :laugh:
Beat me too it!! :whistle:

Dirt and filth too the end.

I've checked with Mrs McG who is a qualified yoga and pilates teacher, she said yoga would benefit you more but it's really down to whatever suits you, pilates movements all come from yoga anyway. The teacher should be certified by one of the professional bodies and also carry insurance. Mrs McG trained for over 2 years for the 500 hours course and she also attends training days, etc.
It is just when I looked up Yoga, I saw so many stories of dangerous instructors, etc, so just want to be sure, that's all.

the main thing is - if it hurts, don't do it!
If we all subscribed to that then...... Oh wait, this is a 'family forum!' :laugh:
 

summerdays

Cycling in the sun
Location
Bristol
It depends on your definition of hurt of course .... Being a lazy so and so, I've been known to take the easy option and she knows, she encourages us to make an effort but always tells us to stop if it is pain. Last night they were discussing how some pilates classes become a bit competitive when doing a plank to the point of causing injuries... I can truly say ours isn't, and we laugh with each other when we are struggling, different people seem to excel at different exercises. I'm good at the stretchy supple ones and weak at the balance and strength ones. I enjoy the banter.

I'll ignore all rude comments about wrists:whistle:
 
I've tried yoga on several occasions, and Tai Chi (which was like very slow motion karate movements), but couldn't get on with them. I prefer stretching exercises.

If you want to improve your posture and get some fitness, I'd recommend going down to the pool and swim as many lengths as you're able - taking it easy at first.

You might need to have a swimming instructor check your technique and breathing, to ensure you're not going to drown. ^_^
 

J1888

Über Member
I'm 2 sessions in to a 5 week beginner's Iyengar Yoga course - I like it.

It's not high intensity stuff (not meant to be) but does offer some good stretches of parts of the body that I had never felt stretch before.

Sadly, I'm not bendy at all and I am pretty much the bottom of the class.

Oh and I have bony feet so the 'sitting o the edge of your feet' bits are a fricking nightmare.
 
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