£200 per metre

Discussion in 'General Cycling Discussions' started by classic33, 12 Jun 2018.

  1. classic33

    classic33 Legendary Member

    What type of off-road surface dressing costs £200 per metre?

    Local council awarded £1,450,000 to make a canal towpath into a dual use cycleway.
     
  2. Smeggers II

    Smeggers II Guest

    There's probably more to it than "surface dressing".

    Compare it with cost per km to build a road.
     
    glasgowcyclist likes this.
  3. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Legendary Member

    For a new road you could use about £100-£150/sqm (Assuming a lot of things such as land/planning/preparation is not required and that there would be no significant structures/earthworks ).

    So for 10miles that would be about 15million quid assuming a 8.3m xsection.

    https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?h=0&f=23&t=1423119

    Surface in most parts were brought upto a off-road walking route standard, including major works related to it only a few years ago. They've to change the surface dressing for cycles.
     
  4. Nigel-YZ1

    Nigel-YZ1 Guru

    Location:
    Don't know
    Well they've got to factor in the cost of 300 'Cyclists Dismount' signs.
     
  5. glasgowcyclist

    glasgowcyclist Charming but somewhat feckless

    Location:
    Scotland
    Scot Gov is spending £21,468 per metre to widen a 17.7km stretch of the A82 by 1.2m! Total spend is £380,000,000.
     
  6. srw

    srw It's a bit more complicated than that...

    If they're going to do the job properly they need to excavate the existing path, lay proper foundations and drains before putting on the tarmac top layer.

    Perhaps if you provided a link to the reports someone who properly understands these things can tell you where the fairly modest budget is going.
     
    User45 and Smeggers II like this.
  7. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Legendary Member

    Nigel-YZ1 likes this.
  8. Smeggers II

    Smeggers II Guest

    Roads vary massively due to tunnels, bridges and stuff but something more meaningful here...

    Chris Grayling: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the average cost of building a kilometre of road lane was in each year since 1997. [125978]

    Dr. Ladyman: The following table lists the cost per kilometre in real terms of building road lanes on the strategic roads network in each complete year since 1997.

    The ranges of cost reflect the different types of projects delivered in each year since 1997. Seven projects were delivered in 1999-2000, two of which included tunnels. Only one project adding lane capacity was completed in 2001-02 and the majority of its cost was in strengthening an existing bridge.

    Cost per lane km in real terms (£ million)
    1997-98

    £2.8

    1998-99

    £4.4

    1999-2000

    £10.2

    2000-01

    £2.7

    2001-02

    £34.9

    2002-03

    £1.2

    2003-04

    £2.6

    2004-05

    £1.6

    2005-06

    £3.5

    https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200607/cmhansrd/cm070329/text/70329w0010.htm
     
  9. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Legendary Member

    Major work you list above has already been carried out. It's the surface dressing that requires changing.
     
  10. Smeggers II

    Smeggers II Guest

    How do you know that, can we see too?
     
  11. srw

    srw It's a bit more complicated than that...

    Show us the link.

    There's no way that a footpath's foundations are adequate for a bike path.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    classic33

    classic33 Legendary Member

    It's not as wide as a single lane road. A skid steer can block it entirely.
     
  13. Nigel-YZ1

    Nigel-YZ1 Guru

    Location:
    Don't know
    classic33 likes this.
  14. Smeggers II

    Smeggers II Guest

    Well clearly, it was just to give your quoted figures some more accurate relativism rather than broad strokes conjecture.
     
  15. Why give a link when you can stretch the info over a hundred posts, you don't get to be a prolific poster that way :rolleyes:
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice