30 mile round trip commute

Mark68

Senior Member
Location
Near york uk
My commute is 15 miles each way by the way. I do cycle one day a week when I am on a late which is great as I can have a nice ride in without any rush for an 11 am start. I get a nice quiet ride back in the evening. My route is on a B road and is generally ok to cycle on.
Only thing is I start work at 6.30 on the other 4 days so cycling in on those is tough. takes about 50-55 mins. I do have a 125cc scooter that I use but with the roads being gritted salt has taken its toll and needed a new disc and pads, and also a new caliper earlier in the year. Managed to get a second hand one for 90 quid fitted but 350 new. The salt has also started attacking the insides that I can't clean so I am thinking about selling while it's still in reasonable condition. The scooter maintenance is not quite as cheap as I had hoped and working out hard to justify keeping.

I know the bike is an expensive piece of kit, but I do love cycling and choose to when i can. Number of bikes = number + 1^_^

We are thinking about getting a second car so I could possibly car to work and leave it there, cycle back then cycle in the next day, but what if we need the car and it's at work? Thing is with a second car is 2 lots of maintenance and they do need using. The cost of another car is a lot more than a bike. We could risk an older one, but we have just exchanged that for a newer car as the old one was turning into a money pit.

So that leads me to an E bike. No high servicing costs and it would get me to and from work on a charge. I could use the car if I was too tired some days. With an ebike i could ride back even when feeling a bit tired and just use the assist a bit more. I can also do all of my own maintenance.
I am a regular cyclist so was looking at a road bike like the trek e, but that is really expensive so probably not a reality. I can average 16-18 mph so the bike would only be an assist on hills purely to help get me to work a bit quicker, but also I could arrive without feeling to knackered if into a headwind. My commute is about 850 ft of climbing
I have also seen some cannondale bikes that have a removable battery which is good as it could be replaced if necessary.

Any ideas how these bikes motors and batteries are for extended use like i am thinking?

Sorry about the long and rambling post, but I just wrote what I was thinking at the time :rolleyes:
 

Slick

Guru
An ebike would be perfect for you.

I've said it loads of times, if I had to cycle my 15 mile each way commute every day I would definitely invest in one. My advice would be to buy as good as you can manage as there are some shoddy examples out there. I like the Bosch pedal assist on the Bergamont but loads of other quality options.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Not sure if the time saving will be significant. Let's assume that in the 30 miles, half is climbing and half descending. So with pedal assist, you would do 15 miles in 60 mins. Now for the descent and to make the calculations easy, let's assume you could average 30mph. Thus the 15 miles descending would take 30 mins. So the total for the round trip would be 90mins and for a one way commute - 45 mins.

So the saving in time would only be 5-10 mins. Significant for cycling, but 10 mins extra in bed not very significant. True you should arrive fresher, but once fitness is achieved, you won't feel that tired.

Perhaps a shop would let you take one for a trial commute?
 
OP
M

Mark68

Senior Member
Location
Near york uk
Not sure if the time saving will be significant. Let's assume that in the 30 miles, half is climbing and half descending. So with pedal assist, you would do 15 miles in 60 mins. Now for the descent and to make the calculations easy, let's assume you could average 30mph. Thus the 15 miles descending would take 30 mins. So the total for the round trip would be 90mins and for a one way commute - 45 mins.

So the saving in time would only be 5-10 mins. Significant for cycling, but 10 mins extra in bed not very significant. True you should arrive fresher, but once fitness is achieved, you won't feel that tired.

Perhaps a shop would let you take one for a trial commute?
That's kind of what I was thinking, but my job is physical so arriving feeling fresher is a nice idea.
I am reasonably fit and don't think my fitness will improve much more hence the thinking.
 
I can average 16-18 mph so the bike would only be an assist on hills purely to help get me to work a bit quicker,
You need to think carefully because an ebike might slow you down.

Pedalling one over the speed cut off limit of 15.5mph will be hard work, so what you gain on the hills, you lose on the flats.

The best bet might be one of the light assist - and lighter - roadie ebikes such as the Orbea Gain.

But what you really need to do is try one on the route.
 
OP
M

Mark68

Senior Member
Location
Near york uk
You need to think carefully because an ebike might slow you down.

Pedalling one over the speed cut off limit of 15.5mph will be hard work, so what you gain on the hills, you lose on the flats.

The best bet might be one of the light assist - and lighter - roadie ebikes such as the Orbea Gain.

But what you really need to do is try one on the route.
That's exactly what I was wondering. If an ebike would slow me down on the flats. Today for example I averaged 19mph, but it was perfect cycling weather if a little chilly with an ever so slight following breeze. I wondered then if I would be able to sustain that average speed over today's ride. I would really like the trek from 2019 as it looked like it supports riding speeds higher because it has the Bosch performance motor. It is just a bit too expensive.
I would also like the option to replace the battery if it broke or I could have one as a backup.
 

Zanelad

Veteran
Location
Aylesbury
I ride an e bike to work and. I don't find cycling above the speed at which the motor stops assisting that hard. Mine stops at 16mph and whilst i notice it when the assistance finally stops it's momentary and then it feels just like riding a non powered bike. Get it going over 17 or 18mph and there's no differemce at all. Until Icome to a hill, of course. If you're a bit bushed at the end of the day just ride home at 14-15 mph and let the bike share the load.
 
OP
M

Mark68

Senior Member
Location
Near york uk
I ride an e bike to work and. I don't find cycling above the speed at which the motor stops assisting that hard. Mine stops at 16mph and whilst i notice it when the assistance finally stops it's momentary and then it feels just like riding a non powered bike. Get it going over 17 or 18mph and there's no differemce at all. Until Icome to a hill, of course. If you're a bit bushed at the end of the day just ride home at 14-15 mph and let the bike share the load.
Thanks that's what I'm thinking. Letting the bike share the load especially if into a headwind. Just looking at the focus paralane seems decent and not too heavy for an ebike. Just looking if it takes mudguards. I think it does.
 
OP
M

Mark68

Senior Member
Location
Near york uk
Will see if anywhere local has one
 

rivers

How far can I go?
Location
Bristol
I sometimes commute with my wife's ebike just to give my legs a bit of break (my commute is 25 miles round trip, about 1200 ft of climbing). It's slower than my road bike on the way in/about the same on the way home (use a mainly off-road shared path on the way in, roads on the way back), but it is a sit up and beg Dutch style. So you might not actually save time, but will save your legs a bit.
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
Its not always about outright speed. Its more about saving effort for similar speed. When weather, wind or just fatigue causes excessive effort.
 
OP
M

Mark68

Senior Member
Location
Near york uk
Yes, I have had a go and found when it's a headwind it definitely helps. Also if a little weary then when the road goes up you can definitely feel the assistance kick in so very helpful on that front. Climbing does definitely become that bit easier.
What was interesting though is you can also get a good workout if you want.
 

Aquilo

New Member
Hi
I have a 64 km round trip commute and have moved to an ebike. For me the advantage has not been time, I save about 10 to 15 mins on a normal bike, but it’s the ability to let the bike take some of the strain after a long day or when there is a screaming headwind. Also I’m more likely to cycle in than whimp out and get the train.
it still gives you a work out if you want to push beyond the 16mph limit.
cheers Bill
 

CXRAndy

Guru
Location
Lincs
There is also a S Pedelec upto 28mph. You need a driving license before 2001 or motorcycle CBT. The rest is paperwork and insurance. But if you're going to be riding constantly throughout the year for multi years. A decent bike with power/guards/ racks and factory lights it would be my way to go/

According to reports these S Peds have massively reduced the commuting by car into Berlin. Imagine the time saved, less hassle in towns because your bike can travel as fast, and you can still filter:biggrin:
 

Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
If you don't maintain and clean an ebike then you would also have to pay out for new parts. Personally, I would stick with mixing between a scooter/125 and your bike, but introduce some cleaning and maintenance.
 
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